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WELLESLEY COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 



CALENDAR 
1924 - 1925 



WELLESLEY, MASSACHUSETTS 
NOVEMBER, 1924 



Series 13 



Number 6 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 
CALENDAR 



1924-1925 



INSURANCE PRESS, INC. 

74 INDIA STREET 

BOSTON, MASS. 



CORRESPONDENCE 



All inquiries regarding admission should be addressed to the Secretary 
to the Board of Admission. 

As Director of the Bureau of Occupations, Associate Professor Wood 
Is prepared to furnish Information in regard to the qualifications and 
experience of former members of the College who have registered with 
the Bureau as candidates for teaching or other vocations. All former 
students of the College may, by registering, have the aid of the Bureau 
of Occupations in securing positions. 

Inquiries for general information should be addressed to Miss Mary 
Caswell, Secretary to the President. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



AN 



D 



Correspondence 

Calendar 

Board of Trustees 

Standing Committees 
Officers of Instruction 
Government . 

Standing Committees 
Foundation and Purpose . 
Admission .... 

Methods .... 

Examinations 

Definition of Requirements 

To Advanced Standing . 

Of Candidates for M.A. Degree 

Of Students not Candidates 
for a Degree .... 

Degrees: — 

Requirements for B.A. Degree 

Requirements for Honors in 
Subjects 

Requirements for M.A. Degree 

Courses of Instruction: — 

Art .... 

Astronomy . 

Biblical History 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Economics and Sociology 

Education 

English Literature 

English Composition . 

English Language 

French 

Geology and Geography 

German 

Greek .... 



PAGE 

2 
5 
6 

7 

9 

16 

17 
18 
20 
22 
24 
32 
33 

34 

35 

39 
39 

41 

43 

45 

47 

52 

54 

58 

61 

66 

68 

68 

72 

75 

79 



PAGE 



Courses of Instruction. — Cont. 




History 

Hygiene and Physical Educa- 
tion 


80 
86 


Italian 


94 


Latin 


96 


Mathematics . . . . 


99 


Music 


102 


Philosophy and Psychology 

Physics 

Reading and Speaking 

Spanish 

Zoology and Physiology . 
Examinations (College) 


108 
113 
116 
117 
119 
123 


Expenses 


123 


Residence 


126 


Health 


126 


Fellow^ships and Scholarships: 




For Graduates .... 


127 


For Undergraduates . 
Founders Hall .... 


130 
135 


Libraries 


135 


Art Building and Collections 


136 


Music Equipment 


136 


Laboratories and Scientific 
Collections .... 


136 


Forms of Bequest 


140 


Degrees Conferred in 1924 


141 


Certificates in Hygiene and 
Physical Education . 


144 


Honors in Subjects . 
Honor Scholarships . 


144 

145 


Summary of Students 


147 


Officers of Alumnae Associa- 
tion 


148 


Index 


151 



1924 


1925 


1926 




JULY 


JANUARY 


JULY 


JANUARY 


s 


M 


T 


WJ T 


F 


s 


s 


M 


T 


W T 1 F 8 


si M T 1 W T 1 F 


s 


s 


M T 


wj T 1 F S 1 


• • 




1 


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1 


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8 


, 


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24 
31 


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30 


1 AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY | 










• • 


1 


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, , 


t • 


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31 


. • 


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• • 


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30 


31 


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• • 




. . 


..!.. 


. . 


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. . 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 1 




1 


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IC 


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• • 


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• • 


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• • 


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28 


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• • 




• • 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


OCrOBER 


APRIL 1 








1 


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1 


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^1 


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• ■ 




25 


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• ■ 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 1 














1 




• • 


• • 




• • 


1 


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, 


, ^ 


, 


, , 


, ^ 


• • 


1 


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15 


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IS 


19 


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21 


16 


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IS 


19 


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. . 


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31 


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. . 


29 


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■ . 


. . 




. . 


30 


31 




. . 


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. . 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 1 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 






1 


2 


3 


4 


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^ , 


1 


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20 


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28 


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31 


• • 


• • 




28 


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• • 


• • 




• • 


27 


28 


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30 


31 




• • 


27 


28 


29 


30 


• • 


• • 


• • 



CALENDAR 



Academic Year 1924-1925 

Examinations September 15-18, 1924 

Academic year begins Monday, September 22 

Holiday, Thanksgiving Day, November 27 

Recess from 12:30 p.m. Thursday, December 18, 1924, until 12:30 
P.M. Wednesday, January 7, 1925. 
Registration closes for all students at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, January 7 

Second Semester begins Monday, February 2 

Holiday, Washington's Birthday, . . . Monday, February 23 

Recess from 12:30 p.m. Friday, March 27, until 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, 
April 7. 
Registration closes for all students at 12:30 p.m. . Tuesday, April 7 

Holiday, Tree Day May 23 

Holidays, Semi- Centennial May 28, zV 

Holiday, Memorial Day May 30 

Commencement Tuesday, June 16 

Academic Year 1925-1926 

Examinations September 21-25, 1925 

Registration closes for new students at 10 p.m. . Monday, September 21 

Registration closes for all other students at 10 p.m. Friday, September 25 

Halls of Residence open for new students at 9 a.m. Monday, September 21 

Halls of Residence open for all other students at 2 p.m. 

Thursday, September 24 

Academic Year begins Monday, September 28 

Holiday, Thanksgiving Day, November 26 

Recess from 12:30 p.m. Thursday, December 17, 1925 until 12:30 
p.m. Wednesday, January 6, 1926. 
Registration closes for all students at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, January 6 

Second semester begins Monday, February 8 

Holiday, Washington's Birthday February 22 

Recess from 12:30 p.m. Friday, March 26 to 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, 
April 6. 
Registration closes for all students at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 6 

Holiday, Memorial Day Monday, May 31 

Holiday, Tree Day June 5 

Commencement ,,..,.,. Tuesday, June 22 



Trustees 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Edwix Farkham Greene, B.A. 

President of the Board 



George Howe Davenport 



Vice-President 



Boston 



Boston 



Candace Catherine Stimson, B.S. . 

Secretary 



New York City 



L.H.D. 



William Fairfield Warren, S.T.D., LL.D. Emeritus . Brookline 

Louise McCoy North, M.A. .... Madison, N. J. 

Andrew Fiske, Ph.D. 

George Edwin Hour, D.D., LL.D. . 

William Edwards Huntington, S.T.D., LL.D. 

Caroline Hazard, M.A., Litt.D., LL.D. 

George Herbert Palmer, M.A., Litt.D., 

Eugene V. R. Thayer, B.A. . 

Galen L. Stone .... 

Paul Henry Hanus, B.S., LL.D. . 

Alice Upton Pearmain, M.A. 

Belle Sherwin, B.S. 

Alfred Lawrence Aiken, M.A. . 

Jessie Claire McDonald, M.S. 

Grace Goodnow Crocker, B.A. 

Charles Lewis Slattery, D.D. 

William Morton Wheeler, Ph.D., Sc.D 

Robert Gray Dodge, M.A., LL.B. 

Hugh Walker Ogden, M.A., LL.B. 

Alma Seipp Hay, B.A. . 

Sarah Whittelsey Walden, Ph.D. 

Ellen Fitz Pendleton, M.A., Litt.D., LL.D., ex officio, Wellesley 

President of Wellesley College 
Lewis Kennedy Morse, B.A., LL.B., ex oflficio . . Boston 

Treasurer of Wellesley College 



Boston 

Newton Centre 

Newton Centre 

Peace Dale, JR. I. 

LL.D. Cambridge 

New York City 

. Brookline 

Cambridge 

Boston 

Willoughby, O. 

Worcester 

Washington, D. C. 

Cambridge 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

. Brookline 

Winnetka, III. 

New Haven, Conn. 



Trustees 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



Edwin Fak^tham Greene, Chairman 
Andrew Fiske Candace Catherine Stimson 

George Howe Davenport Robert Gray Dodge 

Galen L. Stone William Morton Wheeler 

Ellen Fitz Pendleton (ex offi,cio) 
Lewis Kennedy Morse (ex o^cio) 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 



Galen L. Stone, Chairman 

Edwin Farnham Greene Alfred Lawrence Aiken 

Ellen Fitz Pendleton (ex o^cio) 

Lewis Kennedy Morse (ex o^cio) 



COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS 



Ellen Fitz Pendleton, Chairman 
Alice Upton Pearmain Edwin Farnham Greene 

Lewis Kennedy Morse 



COMMITTEE ON GROUNDS 



Belle Sherwin, Chairm,an 
Caroline Hazard Ellen Fitz Pendleton 

Galen L. Stone Lewis Kennedy Morse 



LIBRARY COUNCIL 



Trustee Members 

George Herbert Palmer Lewis Kennedy Morse 

Ellen Fitzi Pendleton (ex officio) 

Faculty Members 

Helen Abbot Merrill Natalie Wipplinger 

Charlotte Almira Bragg Phillips Bradley 

Alice Van Vechten Brown Ethel Dane Roberts (ex officio) 



Faculty 
OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND GOVERNMENT' 



Ellen Fttz. Pendleton, M.A., Litt.D., LL.D., President. 

Sahah Frances Whiting, Sc.D., Professor of Physics and Astron- 
omy, Emeritus. 

Mary Alice Willcox, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology, Emeritus. 

Angie Clara Chapin, M.A., Professor of Greek Language and Lit- 
erature, Emeritus. 

Katharine Lee Bates, M.A., Litt.D., Professor of English Lit- 
erature. 

Alice Van Vechitdn Brown, Clara Bertram Kimball Professor oj 
Art. 

Mary Whiton Calkins, M.A., Litt.D., LL.D., Professor of Philos- 
ophy and Psychology. 

Ellen Louisa Burrell, B.A., Professor of Pure Mathematics, 
Eineritus. 

Hamilton Crawford Macdougall, Mus.D., Professor of Music. 

Elizabeth Kimball Kendall, M.A., LL.B., Professor of History, 
Emeritus. 

Adeline Belle Hawes, M.A., Professor of Latin Language and 
Literature. 

Margarethe Muller, Professor of German Language and Literature, 
Emeritus. 

Sophie Chantal Hart, M.A., Professor of Rhetoric and Compo- 
sition. 

Margaret Clay Ferguson, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

Eliza Hall Kendrick, Ph.D., Professor of Biblical History. 

Elizabeth Florette Fisher'', B.S., Professor of Geology and Geog- 
raphy. 

Amy Morris Homans, M.A., Professor of Hygiene, Emeritus. 

Margaret Hastings Jackson, Professor of Italian and Curator of 
the Frances Pearsons Plimpton Library of Italian Literature. 

Malvina Bennett, M.A., Professor of Reading and Speaking, 
Emeritus. 

Arthur Orlo Norton, M.A., Professor of the History and Principles 
of Education. 

Louise Sherwood McDowell, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Anna Jane McKeag, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of the History and 
Principles of Education. 

Eva Chandler, B.A., Professor of Mathematics, Emeritus. 

Mary Sophia Case, B.A., Professor of Philosophy, Emeritus. 

ViDA DuTTON ScuDDER, M.A., L.H.D., Profcssor of English Litera- 
ture. 

Katharine May Edwards, Ph.D., Professor of Greek and Compara- 
tive Philology. 

^The officers of instruction are arranged in three groups; the first group 
includes professors, associate professors and assistant professors, the second 
instructors, and the third other officers. 

^Absent on leave. 



10 Faculty 

Chahlotte Almira Bragg, B.S., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Margaret Pollock Sherwood, Ph.D., L.H.D., Professor of English 
Literature. 

Helen Abbot Merrill, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Marian Elizabeth Hubbard, B.S., Professor of Zoology. 

Alice Walton, Ph.D., Professor of Latin and Archaeology. 

Eleanor Acheson McCulloch Gamble, Ph.D., Professor of Psy- 
chology and Director of the Psychological Laboratory, 

Alice Vinton Waite, M.A., Professor of English Language and 
Literature. Dean. 

Clarence Grant Hamilton, M.A., Professor of Music. 

Laura Emma Lockwood, Ph.D., Professor of English Language and 
Literature. 

Martha Hale Shackford, Ph.D., Professor of English Literature. 

Caroline Rebecca Fletcher, M.A., Associate Professor of Latin. 

Julia Swift Orvis, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Natalie Wipplinger, Ph.D., Professor of German. 

Grace Evangeline Davis, M.A., Associate Professor of Physics. 

RoxANA Hayward Vivian, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Charles Lowell Young, B.A., Associate Professor of English Lit- 
erature. 

Edna Virginia Moffett, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

Martha Pike Conant, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English Lit- 
erature. 

Agnes Frances Perkins, M.A., Associate Professor of Rhetoric and 
Composition. 

Mabel Elisabeth Hodder, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Laetitia Morris Snow, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

William Skarstrom, M.D., Professor of Hygiene and Physical 
Education. 

Josephine Harding Batchelder, M.A., Associate Professor of 
Rhetoric and Composition. 

Clara Eliza Smith, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Eugene Clarence Howe, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Hygiene 
and Physical Education. 

John Charles Duncan, Ph.D., Professor of Astronomy and Direc- 
tor of the Whitin Observatory. 

Julia Eleanor Moody, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Alice Ida Perry Wood*, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English 
Literature. 

Mary Campbell Bliss, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Alice Huntington Bushee^ M.A., Professor of Spanish. 

Edward Ely Curtis, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

Ellziabeth Wheeler Manwaring, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Rhetoric and Composition. 

Helen Somersby French, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Muriel Strjeibert Curtis, B.A., B.D., Assistant Professor of Biblical 
History. 

^Absent on leave. 

^Absent on leave for the first semester. 



Faculty 1 1 

Alfred Dwight Sheffield^', M.A., Associate Professor of Rhetoric 

and Composition. 
Laura Alandis Hibbard, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English 

Literature. 
Mary Jean Lanier, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geology and 

Geography. 
Olive Dutcher, M.A., B.D., Associate Professor of Biblical History. 
Frances Lowater, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 
Eunice Clara Smith-Goard^ M.A., Lie. is Let., Assistant Professor 

of French. 
Mabel Minerva Young, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 
Alice Maria Ottley, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany and 

Curator of Herbarium. 
Myrtilla Avery^ B.L.S., M.A., Associate Professor of Art. 
Jane Isabel Newell, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Sociology. 
Howard Edward Pulling, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 
Annie Kimball Tuell, M.A., Assistant Professor of English Litera- 
ture and Composition. 
Anna Bertha Miller^ Ph.D., Associate Professor of Latin. 
Lennie Phoebe Copeland, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 
Mary Curtis Graustein, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
Louise Pettibone Smith, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biblical 

History. 
Seal Thompson, M.A., Assistant Professor of Biblical History. 
Judith Blow Williams, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 
Lucy Wilson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 
Kelen Sard Hughes, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Rhetoric and 

Composition. 
Babnette Miller^, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 
Alice Middleton Boring^, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 
Elizabeth Donnan, B.A., Associate Professor of Economics and 

Sociology. 
Elizabeth Parker Hunt, M.A., Assistant Professor of Reading and 

Speaking. 
Mary Amerman Griggs, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
Mabel Louise Cumjungs, B.S., Professor of Hygiene and Physical 

Education and Director of the Department. 
Edith Margaret Smaill*, Assistant Professor of Reading and 

Speaking. 
Helen Isabel Davis, B.A., Assistant Professor of Horticulture and 

Landscape Gardening. 
Margaret Terrell Parker, M.A., Assistant Professor of Geology 

and Geography. 
Henry Raymond Mussey, Ph.D., Professor of Economics. 
Gordon Boit Wellman, Th.D., Assistant Professor of Biblical 

History. 
Phillips Bradley, B.A., Assistant Professor of History. 

^Absent on leave. 

^Absent on leave for the first semester. 

^Absent on leave for the second semester. 



12 Faculty 

Mary Louise Sawyer, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Botany. 
'Emma Marshall Denkinger, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English 

Language. 
Bertha Monica Stearns, M.A., Assistant Professor of Rhetoric and 

Composition. 
Ruth Elvira Clark, Litt.D., Assistant Professor of French. 
Ruth Johnstin, M.A., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
Marguerite Mespoulet, Agregie de VUniversite, Associate Professor 

of French. 
Henriette Andrieu, Agregee de VUniversitS, Associate Professor 

of French. 
Alfred Henry Meyer, Mus.B., B.A., Assistant Professor of Music. 
Ada May Coe, M.A., Assistant Professor of Spanish. 
Thomas Hayes Procter, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy. 
Frances Melville Perry, M.A., Visiting Professor of Rhetoric and 

Composition. 
Margaret Lynn, M.A., Visiting Professor of English Literature. 
Michael Jacob Zigler, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology. 
Philip Henry Mitchell, Ph.D., Visiting Associate Professor of 

Physiology. 
Emily Josephine Hurd, Instructor in Pianoforte. 
Albert Thomas Foster, Instructor in Violin. 
Leah Brown Allen^ M.A., Instructor in Astronomy. 
Blanche Francis Brocklebank, Instructor in Pianoforte. 
Margaret Johnson, Instructor in Hygiene and Physical Education. 
Mary Sophie Haagensen, Instructor in Hygiene and Physical Ed- 
ucation. 
Dorothy Warner Dennis, B.A., Dipl. E.U., Instructor in French. 
Margaret Alger Hayden, Ph.D., Instructor in Zoology. 
Elisabeth Wilkins Thomas, M.A., Instructor in Rhetoric and 

Composition. 
Helen Stillwell Thomas, M.A., Instructor in Botany. 
Ruby Willis, B.A., Instructor in Mathematics. 
El\tra Slack, M.A., Instructor in Rhetoric and Composition. 
Harriet Cutler Waterman, M.A., Instructor in Zoology. 
Carl Webster, Instructor in Violoncello. 
Hilda Lydia Begeman, M.A., Instructor in Physics. 
Gladys Kathryn McCosh, M.S., Instructor in Zoology. 
Caridad Rodriguez-Castellano, M.A., Instructor in Spanish. 
Caroline Whitehouse Coleman, B.A., Instructor in Hygiene and 

Physical Education. 
Charlotte Genevieve MacEwan, B.S., Instructor in Hygiene and 

Physical Education. 
Edith Bullard, Instructor in Vocal Music. 
Moses Bailey, M.A., S.T.M., Instructor in Biblical History. 
Renee Jardin, Lie. "es Let., Lie. en D., Instructor in French. 
Marjorie Cornelia Day, M.A., Instructor in Philosophy and Psy- 
chology. 
Janet Agnes Williamson, M.A., Instructor in Zoology. 

^Absent on leave. 



Faculty 13 

Edith Steele Bowen^ M.A., Instructor in Zoology. 

Edith Christina Johnson^ M.A., Instructor in Rhetoric and Com- 
position. 

Davidson Rankin McBride, B.A., Instructor in Economics and 
Sociology. 

Edith Winifred Moses, M.A., Instructor in Beading and Speaking, 

Lawrence Smith, M.A., Instructor in Economics. 

Ruth Aikman Damon, M.A., Instructor in Reading and Speaking, 

Grace Elizabeth Howard, Ph.D., Instructor in Botany and Curator 
of the Museum. 

Fanny Garrison, B.A., Instructor in Hygiene and Physical 
Education. 

Louise Habermeyer, Instructor in German, 

Elizabeth Macnaughton, M.D., Instructor in Zoology. 

Elizabeth Lois Mann, M.A., Instructor in Rhetoric and Com- 
position. 

Ethel Louise Anderton, M.A., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Waldo Emerson Palmer, B.A., Instructor in History. 

Walter Buckingham Smith, M.A., Instructor in Economics, 

Helen Mary Thompson, Instructor in Hygiene and Physical Edu- 
cation. 

Marjorie Boyd, B.S., Instructor in Physiology. 

Concha Breton, B.A., Instructor in Spanish. 

Lucienne Foubert Chamberlin, C.S. (partie franqaise) Instructor 
in French. 

Anita Elisabeth Klein, M.A., Instructor in Greek and Latin. 

Kenneth Knight Landes, M.A., Instructor in Geology and Geog- 
raphy, 

Emma Fuller Waterman, B.A., Instructor in Hygiene and Physical 
Education. 

Carol McMillan^ B.A., Instructor in Reading and Speaking. 

Francoise Ruet, Lie. es Let., M.A. Instructor in French. 

Esther Mohr McGill, M.A., Instructor in Rhetoric and Composi- 
tion. 

Agnes Anne Abbot, Assistant in Art. 

Elisabeth Biewend, Assistant in German. 

Gertrude Coleman Seelye, B.A., Assistant in Botany. 

Olive Watkins, B.A., Assistant in Chemistry, 

Marion Lawrence, M.A., Assistant in Art. 

Annie Bigelow Stowe, B.A., Assistant in Music. 

Adele Vacchelli, B.A., Assistant in Italian. 



Albert Pitts Morse, Curator of Zoology Museum. 

Celia Howard Hersey, B.A., Secretary of the Farnsworth Art 

Museum. 
Kathleen Millicent Leavitt, Custodian to the Department of 

Zoology. 

^Appointed for the first semester only. 



14 Faculty 

Helen Fay Porter, B.A., Custodian to the Department of Physics. 
Lois Irene Webster, B.S., Custodian to the Department of Botany. 



Eliza Newkirk Rogers, M.A., Lecturer in History of Architecture. 

Harriet Boyd Hawes", M.A., L.H.D., Lecturer in Pre-Christian Art. 

Hervey Woodburn Shimer, Ph.D., Sc.D., Lecturer in Geology. 

Matilda Remy, Lecturer on the History and Practice of the Kin- 
dergarten. 

Henry Saxton Adams, B.A.S., Lecturer in Horticulture and Land- 
scape Architecture. 

William Pepperell Montague, Ph.D., Lecturer in Philosophy. 

William Henry Geer, B.S., B.P.E., Lecturer in Hygiene and Phy- 
sical Education. 

Marguerite Georges Weill, Agrig^e de VUniversitd, Visiting Lec- 
turer in French. 



Ethel Dane Roberts, B.A., B.L.S., Librarian. 

Antoinette Brigham Putnam Metcalf, M.A., Associate and Ref- 
erence Librarian. 
LiLLA Weed, M.A., Associate Librarian. 
Helen Moore Laws, B.A., Cataloguer. 
Agnes Emma Dodge, Librarian of Mary Hemenway Hall. 



Alice Hall Armstrong, M.A., Alice Freeman Palmer Fellow. 



Special Lecturers in the Department of Hygiene 
and Physical Education 

Walter Adams Bradford, D.M.D., Lecturer on Oral Hygiene. 

Joseph William Courtney, M.D., Lecturer on the Hygiene of the 
Nervous System. 

Foster Standish Kellogg, M.D., Lecturer on Pelvic Hygiene. 

Walter B. Lancaster, M.D., Lecturer on Visual Hygiene. 

Andrew Roy MacAusland, M.D., Lecturer on Orthopedics. 

William Russell MacAusland, M.D., Lecturer on Orthopedics. 

William Emerson Preble, B.A., M.D., Lecturer on Internal Med- 
icine. 

Harold Grant Tobey, M.D., Lecturer in Oto-Laryngology. 

Harvey Parker Towle, M.D., Lecturer on the Hygiene of the Skin. 

^Appointed for the first semester only. 



Officers of Administration 15 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



Ellen Fitz Pendleton, M.A., Litt.D., LL.D., President. 

Alice Vinton Waite, M.A., Dean. Professor of English Language 

and Literature. 
Edith Souther Tufts, M.A., Dean of Residence. 
Katharine Piatt Raymond, B.S., M.D., Resident Physician. 
Edward Erastus Bancroit:, M.A., M.D., Consulting Physician. 
Mary Caswell, Secretary to the President. 
Mary Frazer Smith, B.A., College Recorder. 

Marie Louise Stockwell, B.A., Assistant Secretary to the President. 
Frances Louise Knapp, B.A., Secretary to the Board of Admission. 
Evelyn Amelia Munroe, B.A., Assistant Treasurer. 
Charlotte Scott Whiton, Purveyor. 
Helen Wlllard Lyman, B.A., Head of Cazenove Hall. 
Harriet Lester, Head of Shafer Hall. 
Effie Jane Buell, Head of Pomeroy Hall. 
Charlotte Henderson Chadderon, Head of Claflin Hall. 
Elizabeth Burroughs Wheeler, Head of Eliot House. 
Katharine Harris^ Head of Little House. 
Alice Lillian McGregor, Head of Tower Court. 
Harriet Hatton Maynard, Head of Townsend House. 
Martha Fay Clarke, Head of Horton and Hallowell Houses. 
Mary Hubbard Morse Richardson, Head of the Homestead. 
Jessie Ann Engles, Head of Crofton House and Ridgeway Re- 
fectory. 
JosEFA Victoria Rantzia Stalle:necht, Head of Little House. 
Viola Florence Snyder, Head of Washington House. 
Adaline Foote Hawley, B.A., Head of the Birches. 
Elvira Genevieve Brandau, Head of Wood House. 

Frances Raynor Meaker, Head of Beebe Hall. 

Helen Seymour Clifton, Head of Noanett House. 

Charlotte Mary Hassett, Head of Dower House. 

Belle Morgan Wardwell, B.S., Head of Leighton House. 

Carrie Irish, Head of Stone Hall. 

Ethel Isabella Foster, Head of Freeman House. 

Mary Gilman Ahlers, B.A., Head of Wilder Hall. 

Stella Burse Balderston, Head of Fiske House. 

Mary Cross Ewing, B.A., Head of Norumbega House. 

Lucy Pendleton Bell, Head of Webb House. 

Carolyn May Loomis, Head of Clinton House. 

Florence Irene Tucker, B.A., Assistant to the Purveyor. 

Jessie Richards Adams, Secretary to the Dean. 

Leila Burt Nye, Manager of Post Office. 

Sarah Groff Conklin, B.A., Manager of the Information Bureau. 

Wendell Howard Kayser, B.S., Business Manager. 

Frederick Dutton Woods, B.S., Superintendent of Grounds, 

8 Absent on leave. 



16 Standing Committees 

STANDING COMMITTEES 



Board of Admission. — Misses Bliss, Clark, Grace Davis, Fletcher, 
Knapp {Chairman)', the Dean ex officio. 

Committee on Graduate Instruction. — Misses Edwards, Gamble, 
Hughes, Johnstin, McDowell {Chairman), Mr. Curtis; the Dean ex officio. 

Library Committee. — ^Miss Roberts {Chairman ex officio), Misses 
Bragg, Brown, Merrill, Wipplinger; Mr. Bradley; the President and Libra- 
rians ex officio. 

Committee on Instruction. — Dean Walte {Chairman ex officio), 
Misses Donnan, French, Jackson, Williams, Wood; Mr. Duncan. 

Committee on Honors in Subjects. — Dean Waite {Chairman ex 
officio), Misses Batchelder, French, Hawes, Moody, Orvis; Mr. Mussey. 

Committee on Routine Business. — Misses Bliss, Conant, Griggs, 
Manwaring, Moffett, Sawyer; Mrs. Curtis, Mrs. Hunt; Mr. Mussey, 
and ex officio President Pendleton, Dean Waite {Chairman), Dean Tufts. 

Faculty Members in Senate of College Government Association. — 
President Pendleton, ex officio; Misses Dutcher, Griggs, Kendrick, Lyman. 



Foundation and Purpose 17 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

Wellesley, Massachusetts 



FOUNDATION AND PURPOSE 

Wellesley College was established for the purpose of furnishing to 
young women who desire to obtain a liberal education such advantages 
and facilities as are enjoyed in institutions of the highest grade. The 
first building of the College, erected and equipped under the supervision 
and through the personal means of the founder, was opened to students 
in 1875, with the announced purpose "of giving to young women oppor- 
tunities for education equivalent to those usually provided in colleges for 
young men." Throughout his work the founder aimed to put into visible 
form his ideal of the higher education for women, "the supreme develop- 
ment and unfolding of every power and faculty." 

By the charter, granted by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, "the 
corporation of Wellesley College is authorized to grant such honorary 
testimonials, and confer such honors, degrees, and diplomas, as are 
granted or conferred by any University, College, or Seminary of learning 
in this Commonwealth; and the diplomas so granted shall entitle the 
possessors to the immunities and privileges allowed by usage or statute 
to the possessors of like diplomas from any University, College, or 
Seminary of learning in this Commonwealth." 

In accordance with the spirit of the founder, the College is undenom- 
inational, but distinctively Christian in its Influence, discipline, and 
instruction. 

The members of the College meet daily for morning prayers in the 
beautiful chapel presented in 1899 by Miss Elizabeth G. Houghton and 
Mr. Clement S. Houghton as a memorial to their father. Services^ on 
Sunday are conducted in this chapel by preachers of different denomina- 
tions. At all these services and at vespers on Sunday, the singing is led by 
a trained choir of students under the direction of the professor of music. 

The Wellesley College Christian Association, organized to foster religious 
life, and interest in social reforms and in home and foreign service holds 
meetings for prayer and religious instruction. 

The department of Biblical History affords the systematic study of the 
Bible required of all students. 



18 Admission 

ADMISSION 

In order to qualify for admission to Wellesley College an applicant 
must be at least sixteen years of age and must present satisfactory evi- 
dence of her ability to make good use of the opportunities offered by the 
College. This evidence must include satisfactory testimonials concerning 
character, health, and scholarship. 

Applications for admission should be made upon forms which will be 
furnished on request. An application fee of $10 is required of all appli- 
cants and no registration is recorded until this fee is received. (See page 
125.) The date of application is used as a basis in assigning rooms in 
college houses. Since the number of students to be admitted is limited 
by the capacity of class rooms, it is necessary to close the regular applica- 
tion list several years in advance. After the regular list for a given year is 
closed, promising students may be registered on a competitive list. The 
date of application will not be considered in admitting from this list, 
but the Board of Admission will select the candidates who, from the 
evidence submitted, seem to be the best qualified to profit by a course 
of study at Wellesley College. 

Beginning with September 1929, candidates will be accepted in the 
order of the excellence of the credentials submitted. The advantage 
of an early application will still hold, since rooms will be assigned to 
accepted candidates according to the date of application for admission. 



ADMISSION TO THE FRESHMAN CLASS 

For admission to the freshman class a candidate must present fifteen 
units* of secondary school studies chosen according to the following plan: 

Group I. Prescribed without choice, 9 units: 

English 3 

Mathematics 3" 

Algebra 2 

Plane Geometry 1 
Latin 3 

Group II. Restricted Electives, 3 units: 

History 1 

Two units chosen from foreign language . . 2 
or 

Science 2 

or 
Science 1 and a second unit of History 1 . . 2 

*A tmit represents a year's study of a subject constituting approximately 
a quarter of a full year's work or not less than the equivalent of 120 sixty- 
minute hours of classroom work, two hours of laboratory work counting as 
one hour of classroom work. 



Admission 



19 



Group III. Free Electives, 3 units. 



Candidates entering by the Comprehensive Plan (See page 20), 
who wish to offer subjects for admission In which examinations are 
not given by the College Entrance Examination Board are advised to 
submit the plan for their free electives to the Board of Admission before 
the beginning of the last year of their preparation for college. Subjects 
for the four Comprehensive examinations must be chosen from the list 
of examinations offered by the College Entrance Examination Board. 

Attention is called to the fact that the free margin can be used with- 
out limitation only by candidates who enter by the comprehensive plan 
In which four comprehensive examinations are considerel in connection 
with the school record. Candidates for admission by examination in all 
subjects must choose the free electives from subjects in which entrance 
examinations are regularly offered. These subjects include the following: 



Foreign Language: 




French 


2-4 units 


German 


2-4 units 


Greek . 


2-3 units 


Italian 


2-4 units 


Latin . 


. a 4th unit 


Spanish 


2-4 units 


Mathematics: 




Solid Geometry 


^2 unit 


Trigonometry 


^2 unit 


Advanced Algeb 


ra . . . ^2 unit 


History: 




American 


1 unit 


Ancient 


1 unit 


English 


1 unit 


European 


1 unit 


Science: 




Biology 


1 unit 


Botany 


1 unit 


Chemistry . 


1 unit 


Physical Geogra 


phy ... 1 unit 


Physics 


1 unit 


Zoology 


1 unit 


Biblical History and 


Literature . 1 unit 


Civil Government 


1 unit 


Drawing: 




Freehand 


1 unit 


Mechanical . 


, 1 unit 


Harmony 


1 unit 



20 Admission 

A place on the list of candidates for admission will not be reserved 
for an applicant whose credentials filed in July do not satisfactorily cover 
twelve of the fifteen units required for admission. The assignment of a 
room in a college dormitory to a student who is conditioned in any 
subject does not insure admission since the Board of Admission require 
examinations in September in all units not satisfactorily covered, and 
reserve the right to exclude any candidate whose preparation is, in 
their judgment, so defective as to debar her from carrying successfully 
the work of the freshman year. A candidate cannot be assured of 
admission who is conditioned in even one unit. 

A statement from the applicant's physician to the effect that she is 
organically sound and in good healthy together with a certificate of 
vaccination must be filed with the Secretary to the Board of Admission 
before June 1 of the year in which admission is sought. Blank forms for 
these health reports will be sent to each registered applicant in the spring 
previous to her proposed entrance. Before a candidate is formally accepted 
she is given a thorough physical examination. The College reserves the 
right to reject any candidate if the results of this examination in the 
opinion of the medical staff justify such action or to accept the candidate 
only on the understanding that she will take five years to complete the 
course. 

The student who has met all entrance requirements is qualified for 
immediate matriculation for the Baccalaureate degree in Arts. 

All communications concerning admission should be addressed to the 
Secretary to the Board of Admission, VVellesley College, Wellesley, Mass. 



METHODS OF ADMISSION 

I. The Comprehensive Plan of Admission. — It is believed that 
this type of admission combines the best elements of the certificate 
system and of the examination system in that it requires the school record 
and estimate of character, and also demands four examinations designed to 
test the candidate's intellectual power, not alone her memory of prescribed 
facts. Furthermore, the method ofTers the applicant the fullest oppor- 
tunity to show her ability in subjects in which she believes herself best 
qualified. 

The plan offers a uniform method of admission for the colleges which 
have adopted the plan, and gives the school entire freedom in the 
sequence of its work, making no requirements of certain subjects in the 
last year. 



Admission 21 

The examinations required in this plan are of the type known as com- 
prehensive examinations offered by the College Entrance Examination 
Board. 

Admission by this method depends on two kinds of evidence: 

1. Evidence submitted by the school, as follows: (1) a school report 
covering the entire record of subjects and grades for four years; (2) a 
statement from the school principal including an estimate of the appli- 
cant's scholarly interests, special ability, and character. 

2. Evidence submitted by the candidate, consisting of four compre- 
hensive examinations, selected from each of the following groups: 
(1) English or History, selected by the applicant; (2) a foreign lan- 
guage, selected by the applicant; (3) Mathematics, or Chemistry, or 
Physics, selected by the applicant; (4) a fourth subject designated by 
the applicant from the subjects which may be offered for admission. This 
choice must be approved by the Committee on Admission of the respective 
colleges. 

These four examinations must be taken in one examination season. At 
least two examinations must cover more than two admission units each. 
In each subject chosen except history the applicant must take the com- 
prehensive examination covering all the units offered by her for admission. 

It Is desirable that applicants furnish school records and state the 
subjects selected for examination before February fifteenth of the year In 
which the examinations are to be taken. 

The Committee on Admission of the Individual college must give its 
permission, based upon the evidence submitted by the school, before the 
applicant may take the examinations. The comprehensive examinations 
set by the College Entrance Examination Board are judged by readers 
appointed by this Board, and forwarded to the individual college for 
final decision by the college Committee on Admission. 

Under the comprehensive plan the candidate. If admitted to college, will 
be admitted free from all conditions. Failure to meet completely the 
standard In both kinds of evidence required will not necessarily involve 
rejection of the applicant; the Committee may accept unusual excellence 
In one part of the credentials submitted as offsetting unsatisfactory evi- 
dence or even failure In another part. If the candidate fails of admission 
in June she may be permitted to take examinations under the old system 
In September, but she may not take the examinations for admission 
under the comprehensive plan before June of the following year. 

The comprehensive examinations are conducted in June by the College 
Entrance Examination Board. Information concerning the character and 
scope of the examinations will be found in Document 114 of the College 
Entrance Examination Board. 



22 



Admission 



II. Examinations in All Subjects. — Candidates must take all ex- 
aminations in June, except such as by permission may be postponed until 
September. The admission examinations conducted at Wellesley College 
in June are the examinations of the College Entrance Examination 
Board of which Wellesley College is a member. These examinations 
will be held June 15-20, 1925. 

The College Entrance Examination Board will furnish a list of other 
places at which these examinations will be conducted. 

Students entering by examination in all subjects may take either 
ordinary or comprehensive examinations of the College Entrance Exam- 
ination Board. The examinations which are accepted in English, Latin 
and Mathematics are Indicated below. For other subjects except Biblical 
History and Harmony applicants should consult the list of examinations 
published by the College Entrance Examination Board in Document 114. 





No. OF 

Units 


College Board Examinations 


Subject 


Ordinary 


Comprehensive 


English 


3 


1 Grammar and 
Composition 

2 Literature 

or 
1-2 Grammar, Composition 
and Literature 


Cp. English 


Mathematics 


3 
4 


< 


' A Elementary Algebra 
Complete 
C Plane Geometry 
' A and C (See above) and 
D Solid Geometry 
and 


Cp. 3 Elementary Mathe- 
matics 








1^ iir nane iiiguinjiucLiy 




Latin 


3 
4 




1 Grammar 

2 Elementary Prose Com- 
position 

4 Cicero and Sight Trans- 
lation of Prose 

or 

5 Virgil and Sight Trans- 
lation of Poetry 


Cp. 3 Three-year Latin 




1,*4, 5 (See above) 

and 
6* Advanced Prose Com- 
position 


Cp. 4 Four-year Latin 

or 
Cp. 3 and 

Cp. H or Cp. K Fourth-year 
Latin 



*If Latin 6 is 
required. 



offered as a preliminary examination Latin 1 is not 



Admission 23 

Entrance examinations in Biblical History and Harmony will be con- 
ducted by Wellesley College. Applications for these two examinations 
must be made to the Secretary to the Board of Admission of Wellesley 

College by May 1. 

Examinations for students entering by examination in all subjects may 
be taken in two or more successive years. Students are advised to take 
final examinations in subjects which they expect to continue in college. 

All applications for examinations, and all other inquiries must be 
addressed to the Secretary of the College Entrance Examination Board, 
431 West 117th St., New York, N. Y. Applications must be made upon 
a blank form to be obtained from the Secretary of the College Entrance 
Examination Board. 

A list of 'places at which the examinations are held is published about 
March 1. In order that they may receive proper consideration, requests 
that the examinations be held at particular points should be transmitted 
to the Secretary of the College Entrance Examination Board not later 
than February 1. 

Applications for examination at points in the United States east of the 
Mississippi River or on the Mississippi River, must be received by the 
Secretary on or before Monday, May 25, 1925, applications for admis- 
sion to examination elsewhere iri the United States or in Canada must 
be received on or before Monday, May 18, 1925, and applications for 
examination at points outside the United States and Canada must be 
received on or before Monday, May 4, 1925. 

Applications received later than the dates named will be accepted when 
it is possible to arrange for the examination of the candidates concerned, 
but only upon payment of an additional fee. 

If the application is received sufficiently early the examination fee is 
nine dollars for all candidates examined at points in the United States 
and Canada, and twenty dollars for all candidates examined elsewhere. 
The fee should be remitted by postal order, express order, or draft on 
New York to the order of the College Entrance Examination Board. 

Full information concerning the scope and character of each of the 
examinations may be found in Document 114, published by the College 
Entrance Examination Board. Upon request a single copy of this docu- 
ment will be sent to any teacher without charge. In general a charge 
of twenty cents, which may be remitted in postage, will be made. 

SEPTEMBER EXAMINATIONS.— Admission examinations are offered at 
Wellesley College in September. Mount Holyoke College, Vassar College, 
Smith College, and Wellesley College will jointly conduct examinations 
in Chicago, September 21-25, 1925. The comprehensive examinations of 
the College Entrance Examination Board will be used in September for 
all candidates. Application for September examinations should be made 
to the Secretary to the Board of Admission of Wellesley College by 
September first. The schedule follows: 



24 Admission 

schedule of examinations 
september, 1925 

Monday, September 21 

9-12 A.M. English. 

2- 5 P.M. French. 

Tuesday, September 22 

9-12 A.M. Latin. 

2- 5 P.M. History. 

Wednesday, September 23 

9-12 A.M. Elementary Mathematics. 

2- 5 P.M. German, Italian, Spanish. 

Thursday, September 24 

9-12 A.M. Chemistry, Physics. 

2- 5 P.M. Greek. 

Advanced Mathematics. 

Friday, September 25 
9-12 A.M. Biology, Botany, Zoology. 

REGENTS EXAMINATIONS. — Regents examinations with a rating of 75 
per cent may be offered under certain conditions in place of the exam- 
inations of the College Entrance Examination Board. Credits must be 
presented on the card verified by the State Board of Education of New 
York. 

DEFINITION OF REQUIREMENTS 

The number enclosed in parentheses following the subject indicates the 
number of units assigned to that subject; that is, the number of years 
with five recitations a week which will normally be required in the 
secondary school for adequate preparation in the subject. 

ENGUSH (3) 

The study of English in school has two main objects: (1) command 
of correct and clear English, spoken and written; (2) ability to read with 
accuracy, intelligence, and appreciation, and the development of the habit 
of reading good literature with enjoyment. 

Grammar and Composition. — English grammar should ordinarily be 
reviewed in the secondary school; and correct spelling and grammatical 
accuracy should be rigorously exacted in connection with all written work 
during the four years. The principles of English composition governing 
punctuation, the use of words, sentences, and paragraphs should be thor- 
oughly mastered; and practice in composition, oral as well as written, 
should extend throughout the secondary school period. Written exercises 
may well comprise letter-writing, narration, description, and easy exposi- 
tion and argument. It is advisable that subjects for this work be taken 
from the student's personal experience, general knowledge, and studies 
other than English, as well as from her reading in literature. Finally, 
special instruction in language and composition should be accompanied by 



Admission 25 

concerted effort of teachers in all branches to cultivate in the student the 
habit of using good English in her recitations and various exercises, 
whether oral or written. 

To meet the requirement in Composition, there should be practice in 
writing equivalent to weekly themes the first two years, and fortnightly 
themes the last two years of the preparatory course. Themes should be 
accompanied by simple outlines. The following books are suggested: 
Scott and Denney's Composition — Rhetoric; Neal's Thought Building in 
Composition; Robins and Perkins' Introduction to the Study of Rhetoric 
supplemented by Herrick and Damon's Composition and Rhetoric; Shack- 
ford and Judson's Composition — Rhetoric — Literature; Manly and Rick- 
ert's The Writing of English. 

Literature. — ^The second object is sought by means of the reading 
and study of a number of books, from which may be framed a progressive 
course in literature covering four years. The student should be trained 
in reading aloud and be encouraged to commit to memory notable passages 
both in verse and in prose. As an aid to literary appreciation, she is 
further advised to acquaint herself with the most important facts in the 
lives of the authors whose works she reads and with their place in literary 
history. A few of these books should be read with special care, greater 
stress being laid upon form and style, the exact meaning of words and 
phrases, and the understanding of allusions. 

A list of the books recommended for reading and study and suggestions 
concerning preparation for the College Board examinations in English 
will be found in Document 114 published by the College Entrance Exam- 
ination Board. 

HISTORY (1, 2 or 3) 

All applicants for admission are required to offer one unit in History. 
One or two units of History may be offered in the group of restricted 
electives and the subjects should be selected from the following: (1) 
American History (with or without Civil Government), (2) Ancient 
History, (3) English History, (4) European History. For suggestions 
about preparation in History and the scope of the College Board exam- 
inations candidates are referred to Document 114 published by the College 
Entrance Examination Board. 

MATHEMATICS (3 or 4) 

Algebra. Factors, Common Divisors and Multiples, Ratio and Pro- 
portion, Theory of Exponents including Imaginarles, Radicals and Equa- 
tions involving Radicals, Inequalities, Quadratic Equations (including the 
theory). Binomial Theorem, Arithmetic and Geometric Progressions, Graphi- 
cal Methods. 
Plane Geometry. — As found in Chauvenet, or its equivalent. 
Deficiency in preparation usually results from one or more of the follow- 
ing causes: the use of text-books which are too elementary, insufficient 



26 Admission 

time spent in preparation, neglect of exercises in original demonstration 
in Geometry, and of reviews in both Algebra and Geometry. It is strongly 
urged that there be constant exercise in original demonstration in Geom- 
etry, with frequent written examinations in both Algebra and Geometry, 
the problems proposed being drawn from other sources than the text-books. 

Candidates who wish to offer the new three-year course in Mathematics, 
which Includes in addition to Elementary Algebra and Plane Geometry 
the elements of Plane Trigonometry, are referred for information con- 
cerning the topics to be studied to the New Requirements in Mathematics 
described in Document 114, published by the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board. 

Solid Geometry and Trigonometry. — The requirement is met by the 
courses outlined in the report of the College Entrance Examination Board, 
Document 114. 

LATIN (3 or 4) 

4 Unit Requirement. — Candidates should be familiar with the forms 
and syntax of the language and possess a vocabulary sufHcient to trans- 
late Latin into idiomatic English and English into correct Latin. They 
should also be able to translate at sight Latin prose and poetry of moderate 
difficulty and to read Latin prose and verse according to the Roman 
method of pronunciation with strict attention to vowel quantities. To 
attain such proficiency not less than five forty-minute periods a week 
for four years should be given to the study of Latin. The amount of 
prepared reading should not be less than four books of Caesar's Gallic 
War, seven orations of Cicero (counting the Manilian Law as two) and 
six books of Virgil's ^neid. The reading may be selected from other 
works of the authors named above or from other suitable authors, but 
must include the pro Archia and two other orations of Cicero and two 
books of the ^neid. 

The ordinary examinations of the College Board which are used by 
candidates taking examinations in all subjects will be based on the follow- 
ing prescribed reading: 

In 1924 and 1925. Cicero, the fourth oration against Catiline and 
the oration for the Manilian Law; Virgil, ^neid, I and IV; Ovid, 
Metamorphoses, Book III, 1-37 (Cadmus); IV, 55-166 (Pyramus and 
Thisbe), and 663-764 (Perseus and Andromeda); VI, 165-312 (Niobe); 
VIII, 183-235 (Daedalus and Icarus); X, 1-77 (Orpheus and Eurydice); 
XI, 85-145 (Midas). 

In 1926, 1927, and 1928. Cicero, the first oration against Catiline, 
the oration for Archias, and the Impeachment of Verves, Actio Secunda, 
IV, ch. 52-60 (The Plunder of Syracuse); Virgil, JEneid, III and VI; 
Ovid, Metamorphoses, Book I, 313-415 (Deucalion and Pyrrha); II, 
1-328 (Phaethon); VII, 1-158 (The Golden Fleece); VIII, 616-724, 
(Philemon and Baucis); X, 560-680 (Atalanta's Race). 



Admission 27 

Accompanying the diflFerent passages will be questions on the subject- 
matter, literary and historical allusions, and prosody. Every paper In 
which passages from the prescribed reading are set for translation will 
contain also one or more passages for translation at sight; and candidates 
must deal satisfactorily with both parts of the paper, or they will 
not be given credit for either part. 

Information concerning the character of the Comprehensive examina- 
tion in four units of Latin and suggestions concerning preparation will 
be found In Document 114, published by the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board. 

3 Unit Requirement. — The course of study for the first two years 
is the same as for candidates offering four units of Latin for admission. 
In the third year either the prose authors or the poetry may be offered. 
The required amounts of reading In both the prose and poetry are indi- 
cated under the four-unit requirement. Constant practice In Latin 
writing is essential. Suggestions for study will be found In Document 114 
referred to above. 

Suggestions Concerning Preparation. — Exercises in translation at 
sight should begin in school with the first lessons in which Latin sentences 
of any length occur, and should continue throughout the course with 
sufficient frequency to insure correct methods of work on the part of the 
student. From the outset particular attention should be given to develop- 
ing the ability to take in the meaning of each word — and so, gradually, of 
the whole sentence — just as it stands; the sentence should be read and 
understood in the order of the original, with full appreciation of the force 
of each word as it comes, so far as this can be known or inferred from 
that which has preceded, and from the form and the position of the word 
Itself. The habit of reading In this way should be encouraged and culti- 
vated as the best preparation for all the translating that the student 
has to do. No translation, however, should be a mechanical metaphrase, 
nor should It be a mere loose paraphrase. The full meaning of the 
passage to be translated, gathered In the way described above, should 
finally be expressed in clear and natural English. 

It Is of special importance that practice in writing easy Latin at sight 
should be continued throughout the entire period of -preparation in con- 
nection with the reading of the Latin authors. In the last year special 
attention should be given to translating continuous English Into Latin 
both In the prepared and sight work. 

A written examination cannot test the ear or tongue, but proper instruc- 
tion In any language will necessarily include the training of both. The 
school work In Latin, therefore, should include much reading aloud, 
writing from dictation, and translation from the teacher's reading. Learn- 
ing suitable passages by heart is also very useful, and should be more 
practiced. The work In composition should give the student a better 
understanding of the Latin she Is reading at the time, and greater facility 



28 Admission 

In reading. The teachers of Latin In the preparatory schools are urged 
to insist upon the use of good English in translation. 

The study of Greek Is strongly recommended to candidates who plan 
to elect courses in Latin In college. Ability to read at sight easy French 
or German prose is of great advantage to all classical students. 

FRENCH (2, 3 or 4) 

The requirements follow the recommendations of the Modern Language 

Association embodied in Document 114 of the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board. To this document candidates are referred for Information 
about the work to be accomplished to fulfill the requirements In the 
different years of preparation. The following general suggestions con- 
cerning preparation are offered: 

(1) Emphasis should be laid on the correct daily use of the spoken 
language In the class room, on the correct and Intelligent reading of 
French (apart from translation) and on direct composition, Including the 
writing of short themes in French. (2) From the outset particular 
attention should be given to developing the ability to take In the 
meaning of each word — and so, gradually, of the whole sentence — 
just as it stands; the sentence should be read and understood In the order 
of the original, with full appreciation of the force of each word as it 
comes, so far as this can be known or Inferred from that which has 
preceded, and from the form and the position of the word Itself. The 
habit of reading In this way should be encouraged and cultivated as the 
best preparation for all the work that the student has to do. (3) It 
is particularly urged that the reading be chosen from nineteenth century 
zvriters of prose, verse, and drama, and if possible from more than five 
authors. 

The texts suggested are: — (1) For the two unit requirement: Laboulaye: 
Contes bleus; Daudet: Trois Contes Choisis; France: Abeille; Malot: 
Sans Famille; de la Brete: Mon Oncle et Mon Cure; Enault: Le Chien du 
Capitaine; Legouve et Labiche: La Cigale chez les Fourmis; Daudet: 
Choix d'Extraits, or Le Petit Chose; Vigny: La Canne de Jonc; Augler: 
Le Gendre de M. Poirier; Foncin: Le Pays de France, or Lavlsse: Histoire 
de France, lie annee (Armand Colin, Paris). (2) For the 3 unit require- 
ment: Lamartine: Scenes de la Revolution frangaise; Maupassant: Huit 
Contes Choisis; About: Le Roi des Montagnes; Balzac: Le Cure de Tours; 
Colin: Contes et Saynetes; Colin: Advanced Sight Translation; Sandeau: 
Mile, de la Seigliere; Scribe et Legouve: Bataille de Dames. 

GERMAN (2, 3 or 4) 

The requirements follow the recommendations of the Modern Language 
Association embodied in Document 114 of the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board. To this document candidates are referred for information 
about the work to be accomplished to fulfill the requirements In the 
different years of preparation. The following general suggestions con- 
cerning preparation are offered: 



Admission 29 

(1) The books selected for class study should be thoroughly German 
in character and content. Intensive work on a comparatively small 
number of pages is preferred to a more superficial study of a larger 
number of pages. For the two unit requirement the number of pages 
read in class should, in general, not exceed 300; but in no case should 
the amount be less than 225 pages. Not more than 100 of these pages 
should be taken from readers arranged especially for beginners. For 
the three unit requirement not more than 600 pages in all (i.e., 300 
in addition to the maximum amount for the two unit requirement) should, 
in general, be read; but never less than 500 pages. Not more than one 
work of the classical period of German Literature should be included. 
Besides this intensive reading, some rapid home reading of easier texts 
(100 pages or more) is strongly urged. (2) The results desired can not 
be obtained if a considerable portion of the time is spent on translation 
from German into English, or vice versa. (3) Features that should not 
be neglected are — a. Vocabulary: the careful study of a goodly number 
of common words and expressions drawn chiefly from the texts read. 
b. Frequent practice in the oral and written use of the language without 
the medium of English. This should consist partly in answering in 
German questions put in German, based on the texts read intensively 
In class, partly in reproducing in German, without the aid of questions, 
the contents of these texts (Freie Reproduktion). 

GREEK (2 or 3) 

2 Unit Requirement.— During the two years the student should acquire 
a knowledge of the language sufficient to enable her (1) to translate at 
sight simple passages of Attic prose, and to answer questions on ordinary 
forms and constructions; (2) to translate into Greek a passage of con- 
nected English narrative, based on Xenophon; (3) to read Greek aloud 
with correct pronunciation and with full expression of the sense of the 
passage. 

The prescribed study includes — (1) Grammar: inflections; the simpler 
rules for composition and derivation of words; use of cases; construction 
of sentences, with particular regard to the use and meanings of the moods. 

(2) Prose Composition: regular practice in writing or speaking Greek, 
with at least twenty written exercises, including some connected passages. 

(3) Three books of Xenophon's Anabasis, or its equivalent. 

Suggestions Concerning Preparation. — The acquiring of a good 
working vocabulary should begin with the first lesson, and constant prac- 
tice in the use of the more common words should be kept up throughout 
the course. The students should learn to recognize the words by hearing 
as well as by sight, and should be able to use them in speech as well as 
in writing. Writing Greek from dictation, learning short passages by 
heart, and putting simple English sentences into Greek orally, or answering 
in Greek simple questions asked in Greek serve not only to fix vocabulary 



30 Admission 

and forms in the students' mind, but also to give them a feeling for the 
natural Greek form of expression. 

3 Unit Requirement. — In addition to the preparation for the 2 unit 
requirement stated above, the student must be able to translate at sight 
a passage from Homer, to read it with a correct expression of the 
rhythm, and to answer a few questions on the Homeric forms and on 
the subject-matter. 

The prescribed study includes: three books of Homer's Iliad; Prose 
Composition, continued practice in translation into Attic prose of con- 
nected passages of English. 

ITAUAN (2, 3 or 4) 

The requirements are along the lines of those for French and Spanish 
as stated in Document 114 of the College Entrance Examination Board. 

To meet the two-unit requirement the pupil should at the end of the 
first year be able to read simple Italian, translate from ItaHan into 
English; ask and answer simple questions involving the prime necessities 
of life; write simple notes or statements. The second year should be a 
development of the first, stress to be laid on composition and conversation. 

During the first year the work should comprise: (1) The rudiments 
of grammar, including the inflection of the regular and more common 
irregular verbs; the intlection of nouns, adjectives, participles and pro- 
nouns; the use of pronouns, adverbs, prepositions, and conjunctions 
and the elementary rules of syntax. (2) Written and oral exercises 
involving rules of grammar and forms of expression. (3) Careful drill 
in pronunciation. (4) Careful reading and accurate rendering of from 
100-150 duodecimo pages of graduated text. (5) Memorizing from 
100-150 lines of poetry with special attention to pronunciation. (6) 
Writing Italian from dictation. 

During the second year the work should comprise: (1) More advanced 
grammar work with special stress on the irregular verb, the subjunctive 
mood, uses of tenses, and of the conjunctive pronouns. (2) Reading of 
from 250-350 pages of modern prose — fiction, plays or historical and bio- 
graphical sketches. (3) Compositions (15-20), translations and abstracts 
with constant application of rules of grammar, (4) Memorizing 150-200 
lines of poetry. (5) Writing from dictation. (6) Verbal reports on 
reading or assigned subjects. 

Suggestions Regarding Preparation. — (1) Grammar: verb drill, uses 
of tenses, of the subjunctive mood, and of conjunctive pronouns. (2) The 
reading should be selected with the view of giving the pupil an insight 
into Italian life, at the same time training in accurate pronunciation 
and translation. (3) The student should become accustomed to the 
ordinary spoken language of the class room. The subjects for com- 
position should include biographical sketches and descriptions of views 
(photographs) of Italian cities. 



Admission 31 

The texts suggested are: — 

Bowen's Italian Reader; CoUodi, Pinocchio; CoUodi, Fiaggio di Gian- 
nettino; De Amicis, La vita militare; Giacosa, La paj-tita a scacchi; Man- 
zoni, / promessi sposi; Pellico, Le mie prigioni; Martinengo — Cesaresco, 
Patriotti Italiani; Morandi, Antologia della prosa moderna; Le cento 
migliore liriche; Oxford Book of Italian Verse. 

SPANISH (2, 3 or 4) 

The requirements follow the recommendations of the Modern Language 
Association embodied in Document 114 of the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board. To this document candidates are referred for information 
about the work to be accomplished to fulfill the requirements in the 
different years of preparation. The following general suggestions con- 
cerning preparation are offered: 

(1) Grammar: verb drill; difference between ser and estar; use and 
position of pronouns; prepositions required with different verbs and 
adjectives; use of subjunctive and infinitive. (2) In reading, two ideas 
should be kept in mind: {a) accurate translation especially of idiomatic 
expressions; {b) a gradual development of the power to think in Spanish, 
by requiring the student to explain the meaning of words and phrases 
in Spanish and give variations of text also in Spanish. (3) From the 
beginning the student should gradually become accustomed to the use 
of the spoken language in the class room, training the ear by means of 
short talks on different subjects given by the teacher, and the tongue 
by the different methods already suggested. Original work in composition 
should also be required. 

The texts suggested for the 2 unit requirement are: 

A collection of easy short stories and lyrics carefully graded; Perez 
Escrlch, Fortuna; Ramos Carrion y Vital Aza, Zaragueta; Tres Comedias 
Modernas; Pedro de Alarcon, El Capitdn Veneno; Juan Valera, El 
pdjaro verde; Palacio Valdes, Jose; Jose Selgas, La mariposa blanca; Caro- 
lina Marclal Dorado, Espana Pintoresca; the selected short stories of 
Pedro de Alarcon or Antonio de Trueba. 

The texts suggested for the 3 unit requirement are: 

A grammar; a composition-book; about 300 pages of intermediate 
texts which may be selected from the following: Perez Galdos, Marianela 
or Dha Perfect a; Selgas, La mariposa blanca; Palacio Valdes, La hermana 
San Sulpicio; Isla's version of the Gil Bias; a collection of essays dealing 
with Spanish or Spanish- American life and customs; Moratin, El si de las 
ninas; Larra, Partir a tiempo; plays of the Alvarez Quintero brothers, 
plays of Benavente. 

SCIENCE 

One or two units of science offered in the group of restricted electlvcs 
may be chosen from the following subjects: (1) Biology, (2) Botany, 
(3) Chemistry, (4) Geography, (5) Physics, (6) Zoology. The require- 



32 Admission 

ments in science are met by the courses outlined in Document 114, pub- 
lished by the College Entrance Examination Board. The requirement in 
Botany may also be met by covering the main features in the course 
outlined in the Laboratory Guide for the introductory course at Wellesley 
College, Copies of this guide may be secured if desired from the office 
of the Board of Admission, Wellesley College. 

All students offering science for admission must submit certificates 
concerning the laboratory work in science. Blank forms for this purpose 
may be obtained either directly from the College Entrance Examination 
Board in New York or from the Board of Admission of Wellesley College. 
Students are not required to submit laboratory note-books for admission 
credit in science. If they offer two units of science for admission and 
wish to be exempt from taking one of the two required sciences in 
college, note-books may be called for when the candidate enters college 
to be submitted for approval to the departments of science. 

MUSIC (1) 

The requirement in Music (Harmony) is met by examination at 
Wellesley College on the following: — (1) Knowledge of the following 
chords: (a) all the triads in the major key; (b) all the triads in the 
minor key; {c) the inversions of all triads; {d) the dominant seventh 
chord and its inversions; {e) the diminished seventh chord and its inver- 
sions. (2) Knowledge of all scales, major, minor (harmonic and melodic), 
and chromatic, with their proper notation. (3) Knowledge of the proper 
way of making a manuscript. (See "How to Write Music" by Harris, 
published by the H. W. Gray Co., New York.) (4) Knowledge of 
figured bass; this will be demonstrated by adding soprano, alto, and tenor 
to a given figured bass. (5) Knowledge of harmonizing a melody; this 
will be tested by harmonizing a given melody, adding alto, tenor, and 
bass. Emphasis should be placed on the harmonization of melody. 

Note. — Students who have never studied figured bass will be given 
an unfigured bass to harmonize. 

BIBLICAL HISTORY (1) 

The requirement is met by Course I and either Course II or Course III 
as outlined by the Commission on Definition of Unit of Bible Study for 
Secondary Schools. Statements of these courses can be obtained from 
the Council of Church Boards of Education in the United States, 111 
Fifth Avenue, New York City. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Candidates for advanced standing must fulfill the requirements for 
admission to the freshman class, and when not entering from other col- 
leges must pass examinations in a sufficient number of hours of work to 
gain full standing with the class which they wish to join. All examina- 



Admission 33 

tions on courses offered for advanced credit must be taken at Wellesley 
in June. Special arrangements must be made for admission to these 
examinations, and applications must be received by May first. 

A candidate whose college credentials show that she has covered the 
admission requirements for the freshman class and has completed a 
highly satisfactory ye?.r of work at another college may, at the discretion 
of the Committee on Advanced Standing, be admitted without examina- 
tion to the courses for which her previous training seems to qualify her. 
The number of students to be admitted to advanced standing in any 
year is limited. The admission of all candidates for advanced standing 
will be on a competitive basis. 

An applicant desiring to enter under this provision must make a com- 
plete written statement of the work on which she bases her application. 
Blank forms of application will be furnished by the College Recorder. 
An application fee of ^10 is required of all applicants and no registra- 
tion is recorded until this fee has been paid. (See page 125.) 

Much importance is attached to the quality of the work offered. In 
order to be recognized as a candidate for advanced standing, a student 
must present evidence in the previous school and college records and 
in letters from former instructors that she is a student of excellent ability 
and unusual promise. The College Recorder will correspond with the 
college attended by the applicant and request her entire record and letter 
of honorable dismissal. The required credentials for all candidates are 
due July first. The decision as to the successful applicants for admission 
to advanced standing will be made in the summer of the year of entrance, 
after the reports from the various colleges have been received. 

Candidates admitted from other colleges will be required to register 
during the first year as Unclassified Students. At least two years of 
residence are required to obtain the B.A. degree, of which one must be 
the senior year. The work of these two years must include all of the 
prescribed work (see pages 36, 37, 38) not covered by the credentials 
submitted. 

All correspondence should be addressed to the College Recorder. 

ADMISSION OF CANDIDATES FOR THE M.A. DEGREE 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts must be graduates of 
Wellesley College or of other institutions of satisfactory standing, and 
must present adequate credentials as to their ability to carry on the 
work for the M.A. degree. 

Application for admission as a graduate student in any department 
(Including Hygiene and Physical Education) should be made upon a 
form which will be furnished by the College Recorder on request. It 
is desirable that the application be sent by May first of the year In 
which the student proposes to enter. It should be accompanied (1) by 



34 Admission 

the official record of admission subjects, college courses and grades, 
(2) by a copy of the catalogue of the Institution attended, marked to 
indicate the courses taken, (3) if possible, by papers and reports of 
work. 

A matriculation fee of five dollars is payable when a student is accepted 
as a candidate for the Master's degree. The amount of this fee will be 
deducted from the diploma fee of twenty-five dollars payable when the 
degree is received. 

Eighteen scholarships, as described on page 128, are open to accepted 
candidates for the M.A. degree. 

Circulars containing full information for graduate students will be sent 
on application to the College Recorder. For requirements for the M.A. 
degree see page 39. 

ADMISSION OF STUDENTS NOT CANDIDATES 

FOR A DEGREE 

Applicants who give satisfactory evidence of ability to pursue advanced 
courses of study may be admitted at the discretion of the Board of 
Admission, provided that they satisfy the requirements of the depart- 
ments which they propose to enter. It will be noted that opportunities 
of prosecuting work along special lines are thus open to persons of 
experience and success In teaching who possess the requisite qualifications 
for admission to college classes. 

Applicants of less maturity and acquirement are not ordinarily admitted, 
but if such desire admission they must expect to meet by examination 
the requirements prescribed for admission to the freshman class, or a full 
equivalent for them and to satisfy such additional requirements as are 
prescribed by the departments which they propose to enter. Specific 
statements of these requirements in Music will be found on page 108; in 
Hygiene and Physical Education on page 86. 

All courses, graduate as well as undergraduate, are open to special 
students, subject to the conditions stated by the various departments; 
but every such student is expected to choose a primary subject to which 
she should devote the greater part of her time. A student who creditably 
completes a prescribed group of courses will be granted a certificate. 

As the capacity of halls of residence is not sufficient for candidates for 
degrees, special students cannot be lodged In the college buildings. Com- 
fortable homes may be found in the village at about the same expense 
as in college houses. 

Correspondence should be addressed to the Secretary to the Board of 
Admission. 



Degrees 35 



DEGREES 

The following degrees are conferred by the Trustees upon recommenda- 
tion of the Academic Council: — 

Bachelor of Arts. 
Master of Arts. 

Requirements for the B.A. Degree 

In 1925 

Every candidate for the B.A. degree must complete before graduation 
the equivalent of fifty-nine hours. Two grades in work which reaches 
the passing mark are distinguished: one "Passed"; the other, '* Passed mth 
Credit." In order to be recommended for the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
a student must have "passed with credit" in not less than six hours in 
the first semester of the freshman year and in not less than nine hours 
in each succeeding semester. Deficiency of such work in any semester 
may be made good in accordance with regulations adopted by the 
Faculty. First-year French and first-year German may not both be 
counted among the fifty-nine hours. Neither first year French nor first- 
year German may be so counted if taken after the sophomore year. 
Second-year French, second-year German, first-year Italian and first-year 
Spanish may not be counted among the fifty-nine hours, if taken after 
the junior year. Of the fifty-nine hours required for the B.A. degree, a 
certain number is prescribed, the rest elective. 

I. Prescribed. The following subjects are required as specified: — 

Biblical History 4^ hours 

English Composition 3* " 

Mathematics 3 " 

Language (unless a third language has been 

presented for admission .... 3 " 
Natural Science (if not presented for ad- 
mission) 3 " 

A Second Natural Science .... 3 

Philosophy 3 

Hygiene and Physical Education . . 2t " 



« 



24H hours 

* If a student fails to pass with credit in the second semester of English 
Composition 101, she will be required to take an additional semester course 
in the sophomore year. 

t One hour of this requirement is met by a one-hour course in Hygiene 
and Physical Education in the freshman year; the second hour is met by four 
periods in practical work, two periods per week in the freshman year and two 
in the sophomore year. 



36 Degrees 

Of the required subjects, Mathematics must be taken in the freshman 
year; Hygiene and Physical Education one and one-half hours in the 
freshman year, and one-half hour in the sophomore year; Biblical History, 
three three-hour semester courses in the sophomore and the junior years; 
English Composition three hours per week in the freshman year* Of 
the natural sciences, one must be taken before the junior year; either 
a language or a science must be taken in the freshman year and both if 
neither a third language nor a science is offered for admission. Philosophy 
should ordinarily be taken before the senior year. 

n. Elective. All courses are classified in Grades I, U, IH; Grade I 
including elementary courses and Grade HI the most advanced courses. 
All of the fifty-nine hours not indicated in the above are elective, subject 
to the approval of the Faculty. 

Moreover every candidate for the B.A. degree must show before gradua- 
tion that she has completed either 

(1) nine hours in each of two departments, 

or 

(2) twelve hours in one department and six hours in a second 
department. 

Of the courses offered to fulfill this requirement, at least one full 
course of Grade HI must be taken in the senior year. The nine-hour 
group must consist of at least six hours above Grade I, three hours of 
which must be of Grade HI. The twelve-hour group must consist of at 
least nine hours above Grade I, six hours of which must be of Grade 
HI. The six-hour group must include at least three hours above Grade I. 



In 1926 and Thereafter 

Every candidate for the B.A. degree must complete before graduation 
the equivalent of sixty hours. Two grades in work which reaches the 
passing mark are distinguished: one "Passed"; the other, "Passed with 
Credit." In order to be recommended for the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts a student must have "passed with credit" in not less than six hours 
in the first semester of the freshman year and in not less than nine 
hours in each succeeding semester. Deficiency of such work in any 
semester may be made good in accordance with regulations adopted 
by the Faculty. First-year French and first-year German may not both 
be counted among the sixty hours. Neither first-year French nor first- 
year German may be so counted if taken after the sophomore year. 
Second-year French, second-year German, first-year Italian and first-year 

* If a student fails to pass with credit in the second semester of English 
Composition 101, she will be required to take an additional semester course 
in the sophomore year. 



Degrees 37 

Spanish may not be counted among the sixty hours, if taken after the 
junior year. Of the sixty hours required for the B.A. degree, a certain 
number is prescribed, the rest elective. 

I. Prescribed. The following subjects are required as specified: 

Biblical History 4J^ hours 

English Composition 3 

Hygiene and Physical Education . . 2t " 

Philosophy and Psychology .... 3 

Reading and Speaking ..... 1 hour 

Mathematics (unless four entrance units 
are presented to constitute a satisfactory 

equivalent) ; 3 hours 

A foreign language (unless satisfactory evi- 
dence of a knowledge of a third language 
is presented for admission) ... 3 

A biological science (unless two years of 
satisfactory biological science or sciences 
are offered for admission) ... 3:1: 

A physical science (unless two years of satis- 
factory physical science or sciences are 
offered for admission) 3^: 

Of the required subjects, English Composition, Mathematics, one of the 
sciences and a foreign language (if a third language Is not offered for 
admission), three hours each must be taken In the freshman year; 
Hygiene and Physical Education one and one-half hours In the freshman 
year, and one-half hour in the sophomore year; Biblical History, three 
three-hour semester courses in the sophomore and the junior years; 
Reading and Speaking, one hour per week In the sophomore year. 
Philosophy should preferably be taken In the sophomore year. 

II. Elective. All courses are classified In Grades I, II, III; Grade I 
Including elementary courses and Grade III the most advanced courses. 
All of the sixty hours not Indicated In the above are elective, subject to 
the approval of the Faculty with the following restrictions: ^ 

* If a student fails to pass with credit in the second semester of English 
Composition 101, she will be required to take an additional semester course 
in the sophomore year. . . 

t O'ne hour of this requirement is met by a one-hour course in Hygiene 
and Physical Education in the freshman year; the second hour is met by four 
periods in practical work, two periods per week in the freshman year and two 
in the sophomore year. . 

t If a student presents for admission one year of satisfactory biological 
science and one year of satisfactory physical science she will be required to 
take but one in college and may choose either a biological or a physical science. 
The biological sciences are Botany, Geology, and Zoology; the physical sciences, 
Astronomy, Chemistry and Physics. 



38 Degrees 

Every candidate for the B.A. degree must show before graduation 
that she has completed 

(1) Nine hours In each of two departments 

or 

(2) Twelve hours In one department and six In a second department 

or 

(3) Twelve hours In one department and six In allied courses. 

Of the courses offered to fulfill this requirement, at least one full 
course of Grade III must be taken in the senior year. The nine-hour 
group must consist of at least six hours above Grade I, three hours of 
which must be of Grade III. The twelve-hour group must consist of at 
least nine hours above Grade I, six hours of which must be of Grade 
III. The six-hour group must Include at least three hours above Grade I. 

The programme In the freshman year is as follows: — 

Mathematics 101 with 102 or 103 . . . 3 hours 

English Composition 101 3 

Hygiene and Physical Education 

120 and 121 VA " 

Electlves 9 

Total WA hours 

These electlves must be chosen in accordance with the prerequisites 
given in the department statements from the list of courses named below, 
subject to the following restrictions: — 

(1) One elective must be a science and the second a language (if only- 
two foreign languages are offered for admission). 

(2) Two beginning courses in modern language maj' not be elected, 

(3) Only one of the following subjects may be elected: Art, English 
Literature, Musical Theory, Reading and Speaking. 

Language Sciences Other Subjects 

Greek 101, 201, 202 Astronomy 101 Art 101 

Latin 101, 102 Botany 101 English Literature 101 

German 101, 102, 103 Chemistry 101, 102 and History 103 

and 104 201 Musical Theory 101 

French 101, 102, 103, 201 Geology 101 Reading and Speaking 

Italian 101 Physics 101, 102 and 103 101, 102 

Spanish 101, 102 Zoology 101 

If 16A hours are satisfactorily completed in the freshman year, the 
normal programme for the remaining years would be as follows: — 

Sophomore year 16A hours 

Junior year 15 " 

Senior year 12 " 

If ISA hours are not completed In both the freshman and sophomore 
years, a student may by special permission carry extra hours in the 
remaining years. 

Elective courses must be chosen with great care so that changes fvill 
not be necessary. Students are held responsible for observing the require- 
ments for the degree and the proper sequence of courses. 



Degrees ..^i 39 

Students, except entering freshmen, are required to choose in May 
their free and restricted electives for the year following. All requests 
for changes of elective courses should be sent to the Dean of the College 
before September 15th. In general, no changes may be made after the 
beginning of the year. 

Honors in Subjects 

Students who wish to become candidates for Honors may apply in the 
spring of their sophomore or junior year to the special committee 
appointed to consider these applications. 

All applications from candidates for Honors In Subjects must be 
accompanied by recommendations from the instructors concerned. 

A student electing to study for Honors in Subjects will choose a Field 
of Distinction and will work in that field under the special direction of 
one or more of the instructors concerned who will advise her on the 
possible development of her Field of Distinction and will guide her in 
the carrying on of independent work within it. 

A candidate for Honors in Subjects must take all the prescribed work. 
In place of the regular restricted elective she must take at least twenty- 
one hours in the chosen Field of Distinction. This Field of Distinction 
Includes work in the major department and allied courses, and with the 
approval of the major department directing the work may include not 
more than three hours of research independent of scheduled courses thus 
giving the able student a stimulus to form habits of Investigation in a 
manner to lead to advanced study. 

Admission to Honors in Subjects will be confined to candidates whose 
scholarship, maturity and previous range of acquirement justify excep- 
tional concentration. The work In the Field of Distinction for such a 
candidate will be subject to the following tests: 

1. In general the regular tests of the courses In the Field of Distinc- 
tion must be taken. Including the examinations in these courses through 
the junior year. 

2. A comprehensive examination must be taken in the student's Field 
of Distinction at the close of the senior year. 



Requirements for the M.A. Degree 

The work required of a candidate for the M.A. degree is expected to 
occupy her entire time for a college year and is the equivalent of fifteen 
hours of college work. It includes, In general, no fewer than two full 
courses of Grade III or their equivalent, in addition to a thesis or a 
report or reports based on some piece or pieces of independent work. 
The student should choose one major subject and not more than one 
minor subject, which should be related to the major; or she may, if she 



40 Degrees 

prefers, do all the work in one subject. A candidate for the M.A. 
degree is ordinarily required to have a reading knowledge of French and 
of German, although another language may sometimes be substituted 
for one of these languages. One year of graduate work is required of 
all candidates for the M.A. degree, but more time may be needed for 
the completion of the work. Graduates of Wellesley College may do 
all the work in non-residence, under conditions defined in the Graduate 
Circular. One year in residence is required of all other candidates for 
the degree. 

Information regarding thesis, final examinations, etc., will be found 
in the Graduate Circular which will be sent on application to the College 
Recorder, 



Courses of Instruction 41 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

The following Courses of Instruction are offered by the several depart- 
ments. The College reserves the right to withdraw the offer of any 
course not chosen by at least six students. 

All courses are classified in grades, I, II, III; grade I including ele- 
mentary courses and grade III the most advanced courses. Grade I 
courses are numbered 101, etc.; grade II courses 201, etc.; grade III 
courses 301, etc. 



ART 

Professor : Alice Van Vechten Brown. (Chairman.) 
Associate Professor: Myrtiula Avery/" B.L.S. M.A. 
lecturers: eliza nevvkirk rogers. m.a. 

Harriet Boyd Hawes,* M.A., L.H.D. 
Assistants : Agnes Anne Abbot. 

Marion Lawrence. M.A. 
Secretary of the Museum : Celia Hoa/ard Hersey. B.A. 
Museum Assistants : Alice Churchill Moore. 

Elsie Antoinette Carlson. 

101. Introductory Course in the History of Art. This course aims 
to develop an appreciation of aesthetic values by means of a close study 
of photographs and the works themselves. First semester — A review of 
the general development of Pre-Christian architecture, sculpture and 
painting. Second semester — Early Christian and Byzantine art and an 
introduction to Early Renaissance painting with certain Mediaeval 
examples necessary to make the historical connection. 

Open to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors. No prerequisites. Three 
hours a week for a year. 

First Semester, Mrs. Hawes, Miss Abbot. 
Second Semester, Miss Brown, Miss Abbot, Miss Lawrence. 

103t. Studio Practice. Water color painting, drawing, sketching, 
modelling, and oil painting. 

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. No prerequisites. Three 
hours a week for a year. (Nine hours of studio practice.) 

Miss Brown, Miss Abbot. 

203. Outline Course in the History of Art. This course furnishes 
an outline of the development of styles in architecture, sculpture, and 

tSee note on page 43. 

"Absent on leave for the second semester. 

^Appointed for the first semester only. 



42 Courses of Instruction 

painting (excluding the Far East), and aims to develop observation and 
zesthetic appreciation as well as to relate important monuments to their 
contemporary civilization. This course is not open to students who have 
taken or are taking any other history course in the Art Department. 

Open to seniors only. No prerequisites. Three hours a week for a year. 

First semester, Miss Avery, Miss Lawrence. 
Second Semester, Miss Brown, Miss Lawrence. 

204t. Studio Practice. Design. 

Open by permission of the department to juniors and seniors who have 
completed course 103. Three hours a week for the first semester. (Nine 
hours of studio practice.) Miss Abbot. 

205. Second Year Introductory Course in the History of Art. 
First semester — A general discussion of mediaeval movements, including 
culminating examples of Gothic Sculpture. Second semester — Introduc- 
tion to architecture, an outline review of Romanesque and Gothic archi- 
tecture, with an introduction to Renaissance architecture. Laboratory- 
work is required. 

Open to students who have completed course 101 or 102. Three hours 
a week for a year. First semester. Miss Avery, Miss L.-vwrence. 

Second semester, Mrs. Rogers. 

303. LIistory of Italian Painting. A general review of the move- 
ments and schools of the Italian Renaissance. A brief outline will be 
added in 1924-1925 of later European painting. Laboratory work is 
required. 

Open to students who have completed course 205. In 1924-25 open 
in the second semester, as a semester course, to students who have com- 
pleted course 307. Three hours a week for a year. Miss Brown. 

304. History of Renaissance Architecture. 

Open to students who have completed course 205. Three hours a week 
for a year. Mrs. Rogers. 

305. Advanced History of Painting. (Not offered in 1924-25.) 
Open to students who have completed course 303. Three hours a week 

for the second semester. Miss Brown. 

307. Special Topics in the Medieval Period. 

Open to students who have completed a course of grade III and by 
permission of trie department to seniors who are taking a course of 
grade III. Three hours a week for the first semester. Miss Avery. 

tSee note on page 43. 



Astronomy 43 

308. History of Classical Art. (Not given in 1924-25.) This 
course will present the principles of Greek and Roman Art as developed 
from the earliest beginnings through the Great Periods into Roman, 
including reference to the minor arts, such as vase painting, coins, etc., 
as they are related to the main development. Visits to the Museum of 
Fine Arts in Boston. 

Open to students who have completed course 205. Three hours a 
week for a year. Mrs. Hawes. 

309. Special Studies in the History of Architecture. (Not offered 
in 1924-25.) 

Open to students who have completed course 304. Three hours a week 
for the first semester. Mrs. Rogers. 

310. History of Medieval and Renaissance Sculpture. (Not 
offered in 1924-25.) 

Open to students who have completed course 205. Three hours a 
week for a year. Miss Avery. 

Note — After one full course in the History of Art has been completed, 
three hours of practical work as indicated in 103, 204, above, equivalent 
to nine hours of practice, may count toward the degree; four and one- 
half hours of practical work, equivalent to thirteen and one-half hours 
of practice, may so count, if six hours in the History of Art have been 
completed. This practical work is arranged solely to develop such qualities 
of observation and appreciation as are necessary to the critical study 
of Art History. 

Students in Art courses are required to use laboratory methods, examin- 
ing and comparing the photographs used in illustration. Special studies 
in museums are assigned. 

Previous preparation in drawing is not required. 

The art library is open to students from 8.00 to 5.30 daily, and from 
7.15 to 9.15 on certain evenings. 



ASTRONOMY 

Professor : John Charles Duncan, Ph.D. (Chairman.) 
Instructor : Leah Brown Allen,* M.A. 
Assistant : Katharine Bullard Duncan. 
Laboratory Assistants : Margaret Kendall Holbrook, B.A. 

Frances Louise Seydel. B.A. 

101. Descriptive Astronomy. A general survey of the facts of 
Astronomy, of the methods by which they are obtained and of the 

'Absent on leave. 



44 Courses of Instruction 

theories that account for them; facts with which every educated person 
should be familiar if only to understand the astronomical allusions 
occurring in literature and to be alive to the beauty of the order that is 
about us. 

Open to all undergraduates. Three hours a week for a year. 

Mr. Duncan, Miss Holbrook, Miss Seydel. 

201. Advanced General Astronomy. (Not given in 1924-25.) 
This course and course 205 will take up in greater detail many of the 
topics which are treated in a general way in course 101, and will treat 
other topics as well. It is intended to meet the requirements of students 
who, though not specializing in Astronomy, are not satisfied with the 
knowledge of the subject that can be obtained from a single course. 
Original memoirs will be consulted and the telescopes used. 

Open to students who have completed course 101. Three hours a week 
for the first semester. Miss Allen. 

205. Advanced General Astronomy. (Not given in 1924-25.) A con- 
tinuation of course 201. 

Open to students who have completed course 101. Three hours a week 
for the second semester. Miss Allen. 

202. Practical Astronomy. (Not given in 1924-25.) Determina- 
tion of time with the transit instrument; determination of longitude 
by moon culminations and radio time-signals. 

Open to students who have completed course 101. Three hours a week 
for the first semester. Miss Allen. 

204. Practical Astronomy. (Not given in 1924-25.) Transformation 
of co-ordinates; use of the method of least squares; reduction from mean 
to apparent place; determination of latitude with the zenith telescope. 

Open to students who have completed courses 101 and 202. Three 
hours a week for the second semester. Miss Allen. 

203. Observatory Practice. Use of the observatory equipment in 
work not covered by courses 202 and 204. The specific subjects will 
vary from year to year with such changing conditions as the configura- 
tion of the planets, the appearance of new stars and comets, the occur- 
rence of eclipses, etc. The course may be taken repeatedly. 

Open to students who have completed course 101. One hour a week 
for a year; by special permission, additional credit up to three hours 
may be given for additional work. The amount of work contemplated 
must be indicated at the time of handing in electives. 

Mr. Duncan and Assistants, 



Biblical History 45 

301. Astrophysics. (Not given In 1924-25.) Astrononiical spec- 
troscopy, photography, and photometry. The laws of radiation. Solar 
and sidereal physics; stellar motions. 

Open to students who have completed a course in Astronomy and one 
in Physics, and who have completed or are taking a course in Calculus. 
Three hours a week for a year. Mr. Duncan. 

302. Determination of Orbits. (Not offered in 1924-25.) Determi- 
nation, from three observations, of the elliptic and parabolic orbits of 
bodies In the solar system. Orbits of visual and spectroscopic binary 
stars. Theory and practice. 

Open to students who have completed Astronomy 101 and a year of 
Calculus. Three hours a week for a year. Mr. Duncan. 

303. Celestial Mechanics. (Not offered in 1924-25.) ^ The attrac- 
tion of bodies of various forms under Newton's law of gravitation. The 
problems of two and of three bodies. Perturbations. 

Open to students who have completed Differential and Integral Cal- 
culus. Three hours a week for a year. Mr. Duncan. 



BIBLICAL HISTORY, LITERATURE, AND 
INTERPRETATION 

Professor • Elita Hall Kendrick, Ph.D. (Chairman.) 
Associate Professor : Olive Dutcher. M.A.. B.D. 
Assistant Professors : Muriel Streibert Curtis. B.A.. B.D. 

Louise Pettibone Smith. Ph.D. 
Seal Thompson, M.A. 
Gordon Boit Wellman. Th.D. 
Instructor : Moses Bailey, M.A., S.T.M. 

The requirement in Biblical History for a degree is met by courses 101 and 
102, followed by either 202 or 205. 

101.102. The Development of Thought in the Old Testament. 
It is the purpose of this course to offer studies in the development of 
religion and ethics In the Old Testament. There will be included such 
historical study of Hebrew national life and such presentation of the 
literary problems connected with the Old Testament writings as are 
necessary to make intelligible the development of thought. 

Required of sophomores. Course 101, three hours first semester. Course 
102, three hours second semester. Course 101 will be offered also m the 
second semester, and course 102 in the first semester. 

Miss Dutcher, Mrs. Curtis, Miss Smith, Mr. Bailey. 

201. Development of Thought in Later Jewish Literature. (Not 
offered in 1924-25.) The course will deal with the development of 



46 Courses of Instruction 

thought among the Jews during the period approximately from 300 b.c. 
to 100 A.D. Particular emphasis will be laid upon such topics as the Mes- 
sianic hope, angelology and demonology, life after death and the resur- 
rection, wisdom thought, ethical ideas and sanctions, all in their relation 
to the history of the period. The course should therefore give to the 
students a valuable knowledge of the background out of which Jesus 
came and a clearer understanding of his categories of thought. 

Open to students who have completed courses 101 and 102. Three 
hours a week for the first semester. 

202. The Life of Christ. The aim of this course will be (1) to 
study the environment of Christ in the government. Institutions, manner 
of life. Ideals, and literature of the Jewish people of his time; (2) to 
follow the unfolding of his life from the historical point of view; (3) to 
study the teachings of Christ: {a) In their historical connections as far 
as possible; {b) topically; (4) to become acquainted with the leading 
problems regarding the person and work of Christ, with different points 
of view and with the best literature on the subject. 

Open to students who have completed courses 101 and 102. Three 
hours a week either semester. 

Miss Kendrick, Mrs. Curtis, Miss Thompson, Mr. Wellman. 

203. Elementary Hebrew. The elements of Hebrew grammar, with 
practice in translation and the memorizing of a vocabulary. Reading of 
selections from the Old Testament. At the end of the course the student 
should be able to read simple Hebrew and to use the language In the 
study of the Old Testament. 

Open to juniors and seniors. Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss Smith. 

204. The Apostolic Age. It Is the purpose of this course to offer 
studies In the essential teachings of Christianity as represented by the 
several New Testament writers outside of the authors of the Synoptic 
Gospels. There will be Included such historical study of New Testament 
times and such presentation of the questions connected with New Testa- 
ment Introduction as are necessary to make Intelligible the development 
of Christian thought. 

Open to students who have completed course 202. Three hours a week 
jot the second semester. 

Miss Kendrick, Miss Thompson, Mr. Wellman. 

205. Greek Testament. Text Study of the Synoptic Gospels. 

Open to students who have completed courses 101 and 102, and who 
have met the three unit admission requirement in Greek or have taken 
Greek 101 in college. Three hours a week for the first semester. 

Miss Kendrick. 



Botany 



47 



206. Greek Testament. Text Study of Other New Testament 
Books. 

Open to students who have completed course 205. Three hours a week 
for the second semester. Miss Kendrick. 

301. History of Religions. Introductory study of primitive religions 
followed by an outline comparative study of the rise and development of 
the leading historic faiths. 

Open to students who have completed the required courses in Biblical 
History. Three hours a week for a year. Mr. Wellman. 

302. Interpretations of Christianity. The aim of this course will 
be to trace in the devotional and controversial literature of certain of 
the most important periods of the Christian Church, from the beginning 
to the present day, varying conceptions of the essentials of Christianity, 
to consider the effect upon these conceptions of some of the most im- 
portant currents of thought of the period studied and to make constant 
comparison with New Testament religion. 

Open to seniors. Three hours a week for a year. Miss Kendrick. 



303. Second Year Hebrew. 
Open to students who have completed course 203. 
for a year. 



Three hours a week 
Mr. Bailey. 



BOTANY 



Professors 



Associate Professors 



Assistant Professors 



Lecturer 
Instructors 



Assistants ; 

Laboratory Assistant 
Secretary and Custodian 



Margaret Clay Ferguson. Ph.D. (Chairman.) 
director of botanical greenhouses and 
gardens. 

Howard Edward Pulling. Ph.D. 

Laetitia Morris Snow, Ph.D. 

Mary Campbell Bliss. Ph.D. 

Alice Maria Ottley, Ph.D., 
curator of herbarium 

Helen Isabel Davis, B.A. 

associate director of botanical green- 
houses AND gardens. 

Mary Louise Sawyer. Ph.D. 

Henry Saxton Adams. B.A.S. 

Helen Stillwell Thomas. M.A. 

Grace Elizabeth Howard. Ph.D. 
curator of museum. 

Gertrude Coleman Seelye, B.A. 

Pricilla Presbrey. B.A. 

IRMGARD BERGER, L.G . 

Lois Irene Webster. B.S. 



101. General Botany. This course Is designed to bring the student 
into sympathy with the plant world, to cultivate the power of careful 
observation, to give a knowledge of the fundamental principles of plant 
life and plant breeding. The course Is developed on purely scientific 



48 Courses of Instruction 

lines, but, at the same time, it seeks so to relate our study of plants to 
all life as to give the student that familiar and intimate acquaintance 
with her living environment which makes for the broadest culture of 
to-day. As a basis for acquaintance with the nature and work of plants, 
the structure and development of plants are studied from seed germina- 
tion to fruit formation, and the more simple physiological responses are 
Investigated. The course has an "Outdoor Laboratory" where each 
student is responsible for a definite plot of land which she plants in early 
spring and studies throughout the season. Students are trained to know 
the herbaceous plants in their spring condition, to recognize the early 
flowers, and to know our common trees both in their winter and in their 
summer aspect. 

Open to freshmen, sophomores and juniors. Three hours a week for a 
year. Miss Ferguson, Miss Bliss, Miss Sawyer, 

Miss Thomas, Miss Howard. 

201. Evolution of Plants. This course seeks to give a general 
survey of the plant kingdom by means of the study of representative 
plants of the various phyla. The study of these plants is supplemented 
by readings and discussions of the general principles and theories of 
evolution. There will be field trips for the purpose of studying plants 
in their natural habitats and securing experience in the technique of 
collecting and pressing plant material. 

Open to students who have completed course 101 or its equivalent 
and to juniors and seniors without prerequisite. Three hours a week 
for a semester; offered in both semesters. Miss Bliss, Miss Ottley. 

202. Elementary Physiology. A study of the growth and develop- 
ment of seedlings and mature plants, including flowering and seed 
formation, from the standpoint of the principal processes concerned and 
the chief influences of the environment upon them. In general, the plant 
Is considered from the biological point of view as a responsive and self- 
adjusting mechanism; details of the chemical and physical reactions 
involved receive only superficial treatment. 

Open to students who have completed course 101 or its equivalent and 
to juniors and seniors without prerequisite. Three hours a week for a 
semester; offered in both semesters. Mr. Pulling. 

203. Taxonomy and Geographical Distribution of the Spermat- 
ophytes. This course aims to give the student acquaintance with the 
Seed-plants of our local flora. Special attention Is given to the prin- 
ciples underlying the natural classifications and relationships of the 
different families, to the historical development of taxonomy from the 
early herbalists to the present day, and to a general consideration of 
the factors which have been operative in determining the present geo- 



Botany 49 

graphical distribution of higher plants. In so far as possible the work 
will be carried on in the field. 

Open to students who have completed course 101 or 201 or 202. Three 
hours a week for a semester; offered in both semesters. Miss Ottley. 

204. Cultivated Plants. This course gives an opportunity for a 
scientific study of garden plants, their classification, structure, ecology, 
and physiology, as a basis for their use under various cultural conditions. 
The lectures are accompanied by laboratory practice in the application 
of the principles of propagation, nutrition, and general culture of plants, 
including their requirements of soil, moisture, light, heat, etc., both out 
of doors and in the greenhouse. Greenhouse management is taken up, 
and some of the special problems of school gardening are considered. 
The field work is a study not only of the cultivation of plants but also 
of the natural plant societies, and the artistic value of the various plant 
forms, textures, color and flower effects as elements of design. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed course 201 or its 
equivalent. Three hours a week for a semester; offered in both semesters. 

Mr. Adams, Miss Seelye. 

205. Bacteriology in Relation to Daily Life. A general survey 
of the field of bacteriology. The course aims to give the student an 
intelligent appreciation of what bacteria are and what they do. It 
includes a brief history of the science and a consideration of the relation 
of bacteria to medicine, public health and agriculture. It is designed 
as a general culture course and Is not intended for those who desire a 
technical knowledge of the subject. The course consists chiefly of 
lectures, supplemented by laboratory work. It does not count as part 
of the science requirement. 

Open to juniors who have completed one year of either Botany, 
Chemistry or Zoology, and to seniors without prerequisite. Three hours 
a week for the first semester. Miss Snow, 

301. Natural History of the Thallophytes and Bryophytes. 
This course aims to give the student facility in the determination of Algas, 
Liverworts, and Mosses, and also considers the fundamental problems 
underlying their development and evolution. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed courses 201, and 202 
or 203 or their equivalent. Three hours a week for the first semester. 

Miss Howard. 

302. Comparative Morphology of the Ferns, Gymnosperms, and 
Angiosperms. This course considers the origin, development, and struc- 
ture of vascular plants from the standpoint of evolution. Special atten- 
tion is given to tracing the steps In the development of vegetative 



50 Courses of Instruction 

and reproductive organs, and to a consideration of the homologies of 
sporogenous, reproductive, and embryonal parts. The genetic relation- 
ships of plants, both fossil and living, are carefully considered. Students 
will become acquainted with the technique of plant histology and embry- 
ology by preparing a considerable proportion of the microscopic slides 
used in the class room. 

Open to juniors and seniors ivho have completed courses 201, and 202 
or 203 or their equivalent. Three hours a zueek for the second semester. 

Miss Ferguson, Miss Howard. 

303. Evolution of Plant Tissues. A detailed comparative study 
of the tissues of the lower and higher vascular plants, both fossil and 
living, from the standpoint of evolution. Special emphasis Is laid on the 
origin and development of the elements of the fibro-vascular tissue and 
their distribution In root and stem. A brief consideration will be given 
to the origin and structure of coal, Involving the special technique of 
hard tissues. 

Open to juniors and seriiors who have completed courses 201, and 202 
or 203. Three hours a zveek for the second semester. Miss Bliss. 

304. Pathology of the Higher Plants. (Not offered In 1924-25.) 

305. Ecology. (Not given in 1924-25.) A consideration of the 
natural grouping of plants on the earth and the principles underlying 
these plant associations. The course is divided Into a study of (1) plant 
formations which have arisen In response to climatic conditions, and 
(2) local plant associations which have resulted from physiographic 
changes. This study includes a consideration of the various modifications 
of plant structure found under different environmental conditions. 

Open to juniors a7id seniors who have completed courses 201, and 202 
or 203. Three hours a week for the first semester. Miss Snow. 

306. Physiology. Experiments, lectures, discussions, and readings 
designed to acquaint the student with the higher plants as working 
organisms. The experiments embody problems In, to a greater extent 
than demonstrations of, the fundamental activities of the higher plants 
In relation to their environment. It is planned that Increased precision 
In laboratory manipulation shall keep pace with the student's growing 
knowledge of physiological methods. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed six year-hours of 
Botany in college and who have completed or are taking a year of either 
Chemistry or Physics. The prerequisite in Botany must include courses 
201, and 202 or 203. Three hours a week for a year. Mr. Pulling. 

307. Cytology and Genetics. Studies In the structure of the cell; 
the phenomena of cell division; the constitution of the repro- 



Botany 51 

ductive cells with special reference to the theories of heredity and 
evolution. The relation between definite cell structures and visible 
body characteristics forms the underlying principle of study and experi- 
mentation. At the beginning of the year each student will be assigned a 
practical problem in plant breeding as a basis for the study of the 
behavior of pure lines in hybridization and the origin and transmission 
of characters. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed six year-hours of 
Botany in college. This prerequisite must include either course 302 or 
201 with 202 or 203. Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss Ferguson, Miss Seelye. 

308. General Bacteriology. It is the aim of the course to give the 
student a knowledge of the morphology and physiology of micro- 
organisms with special emphasis upon the principles underlying fermen- 
tation, preservation of foods, methods of sterilization, antiseptics, etc. 
The student will familiarize herself with methods of staining, plating, 
making of transfers, etc. This special technique will be used during the 
second semester in the study of selected problems, such as the milk and 
water supplies, sewage disposal and disease. Although the course is 
designed especially for those students who contemplate a continuance of 
technical work, a large proportion of Informational material is combined 
with the study of standard methods. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have had one year of Chemistry 
and either one year of Botany or Zoology, or a second year of Chemistry. 
Three hours a week for the year. Miss Snow. 

309. Landscape Gardening. The work of this course continues the 
study of ornamental plants begun in course 204, placing special emphasis 
upon their use In landscape gardening. The development of the great 
historical styles in garden design, and the fundamental principles gov- 
erning art are studied as a basis for the appreciation of modern land- 
scape architecture and its function In the advancement of civilization. 
The problems of city planning are discussed from the standpoint of the 
aesthetic and recreational requirements In both urban and rural commu- 
nities. The laboratory practice gives training in methods of developing 
the landscape plan as adapted to the small estate. This course Is In- 
tended primarily to give an Intelligent appreciation of landscape garden- 
ing as a fine art. 

Open to students who have completed course 204, and by special 
permission to seniors who are taking 204. Three hours a week for the 
first semester. Mr. Adams, Miss Berger. 

310. Landscape Design. This course continues the study of prin- 
ciples introduced In course 309, but lays more emphasis upon specific 



52 Courses of Instruction 

methods of carrying out these principles with landscape materials. A 
summary of the fundamentals of good construction is also Included. 
The work is conducted by lecture and discussion, and by laboratory 
practice In planning. Trips are taken as often as possible for observa- 
tion and study of actual examples of the art. 

Open to students who have completed course 309. Three hours a week 
for the second semester. Mr. Adams, Miss Berger. 

321. Seminar. (Not offered In 1924-25.) 

322. Plant Problems. A special problem, for Independent Investiga- 
tion, In one of the following subjects Is assigned to each student: 
(1) Embryology and Genetics; mitosis, sporogenesls, spermatogenesis, 
oogenesis, fertilization, Inheritance, plant breeding. (2) Physiology and 
Experimental Morphology; nutrition, growth, development, effects of 
stimuli on cell activities, structure variations in relation to environment. 
(3) Comparative Morphology and Taxonomy of Vascular and Non- 
vascular Plants; advanced studies in plant anatomy. 

Open to graduate students and, by permission of the department, to 
seniors. Three or six hours a week for a year. 

Miss Ferguson, Mr. Pulling, Miss Snow, 
Miss Bliss, Miss Ottley, Miss Sawyer. 



CHEMISTRY 

ASSOaATE PR0F=HSS0RS : CHARLOTTE ALMIRA BRAGG. B.S. (CHAIRMAN.) 

Helen Somersby French, Ph.D. 
Mary Amerman Griggs. Ph.D. 
Ruth Johnstin. M.A, 
Assistant : Olive Watkins. B.A. 
Laboratory Assistants t Huldah Elizabeth Acly. B.A. 

Helen Laurette Eastman, B.A. 

101. Elementary Chemistry. Lectures and Laboratory Work. 
Course 101 is for beginners In Chemistry, and is intended to familiarize 
the student with the Important properties of the elements and their 
compounds, with their modes of preparation, and with such tests as shall 
lead up to the study of systematic Qualitative Analysis; also to present 
the laws governing chemical reactions, the meaning of chemical equa- 
tions, and the more recent theories adopted In the science. 

Open to students who do not offer Chemistry for admission. Three 
hours a week for a year. 

Miss Bragg, Miss Johnstin, Miss Acly. 

102. General Chemistry. This course is Intended for those students 
who have offered Chemistry for entrance, and who plan to major in 
Chemistry in college. It alms to give a brief Intensive review of the 



Chemistry 53 

preparatory work in Chemistry, with such additional study, particularly 
of the metallic elements and the theories of solutions, as shall prepare 
the students for the grade II courses in the department. 

Open to students who have completed the admission requirement or its 
equivalent, and who are electing course 201. Three hours a week for the 
first semester. Miss French, Miss Eastman. 

201. Qualitative Analysis. A system of analysis for the detection 
of the common metals and acid radicals with the application of theo- 
retical principles to the reactions involved. 

Open to students who have completed course 101 or 102. Three hours 
a week for a semester; offered in both semesters. 

Miss Griggs, Miss Watkins. 

202. Quantitative Analysis. This course Is designed to give train- 
ing in gravimetric and volumetric analysis. 

Open to students who have completed course 201. Three hours a week 
for a semester; offered in both semesters. 

Miss Griggs, Miss Watkins. 

204. Chemistry in its Applications to Daily Life. (Not offered 
In 1924-25.) 

Open to students who have completed course 101 or 102. Three hours 
a week for the first semester. 

205. Quantitative Analysis. A continuation of course 202. 

Open to students zvho have completed course 202. Three hours a week 
for the second semester. Miss Griggs, Miss Watkins. 

301. Organic Chemistry, with Laboratory Work in Organic Prep- 
arations. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed or are taking courses 
201 and 202 and, by special permission, to seniors who have completed 
courses 102 and 201, or 101. Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss French, Miss Eastman. 

302. Advanced Laboratory Course in Organic Chemistry. (Not 
given In 1924-25.) 

Open to students who have completed course 301. Three hours a week 
for the first semester. Miss French. 

303. Quantitative Analysis. (Not given in 1924-25.) This course 
Includes the complete quantitative analysis of some more complex Inor- 
ganic substances. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed courses 201 and 202. 
Three hours a week for the first semester. Miss Griggs. 



54 Courses of Instruction 

304. Chemistry of Food and Nutrition. 

Open to students who have completed course 202 and have completed 
or are taking course 301. Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss Johnstin. 

305. Theoretical and Physical Chemistry. 

Open to seniors who have completed or are taking course 301 and have 
completed or are taking a year of college Physics. Three hours a week 
for the second semester. Miss French. 

306. Laboratory Work in Physical Chemistry. 

Open to seniors and graduates who have completed or are taking course 
305. Three hours a week for the second semester. Miss French. 

307. Inorganic Chemistry. This course makes use of the laboratory 
work of the courses taken in preceding years. 

Open to students who have completed courses 202 and 301. Three 
hours a week for the second semester. Miss Bragg. 

308. Qualitative Analysis. (Not given in 1924-25.) 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed courses 201 and 202. 
Three hours a week for the second semester. Miss Griggs. 

ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 

Professors : Jane Isabel Neweuu. Ph.D. 

Henry Raymond Mussey, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor : Elizabeth Donnan. B.A. (Chairman.) 
Instructors : Davidson Rankin McBride, B.A. 
Lawrence Smith. M.A. 
Walter Buckingham Smith, M.A. 
Graduate Assistants : Elizabeth Madeline Cooper, B.A, 

Marion Lansing Speer, B.A. 

Economics 

lOL Introduction to Economics and Sociology. A descriptive 
course setting forth the evolution of industry, the outstanding features 
of present industrial society, the social problems involved in the present 
distribution of wealth, and the programs and agencies attempting to deal 
with these problems. 

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Three hours a week for a 
year. Mr. Mussey, Miss Donnan, Mr. McBride, 

Mr. L. Smith, Mr. W. B. Smith. 

20L Principles of Economics. A study of current economic thought 
centering about the theories of value and distribution. This course 
is prerequisite to all grade III courses in Economics. 

Open to students who have completed or are taking course 101, and 
by special permission to juniors and seniors who have completed two 



Economics and Sociology 55 

full courses in History or Government. Three houri a week for a 
semester. Offered in both semesters. Miss Donnan. 

203. History of Economic Theory. A study of the origin and de- 
velopment of economic principles and policies, with special emphasis on 
selected controversial questions. 

Open to students who have completed course 201. Three hours a week 
for the second semester. Miss Donnan. 

204. Economic History of the United States. A study of our 
national development in its material and social aspects, with special 
emphasis upon the western movement in the United States and the 
growth of business combinations. 

Open to students who have completed or are taking course 101. Three 
hours a week for the second semester. Miss Donnan. 

209. Economic History of England. This course will include ^ a 
survey of the chief stages in English economic history, but especial 
attention will be devoted to the period since the Industrial revolution. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed course 101. Three 
hours a week for the second semester. Mr. L. Smith. 

301. Socialism and Social Reform. A critical study of certain 
economic and social theories, especially socialism and syndicalism. 

Open to juniors and seniors ivho have completed course 308. Three 
hours a week for the second semester. Mr. Mussey. 

305. Railroads: Rates and Regulation. (Not offered in 1924-25.) 
A brief survey of some of the fiscal, economic, and social problems 
arising from our modern means of transportation. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed course 306. Three 
hours a week for the second semester. Miss Donnan. 

306. Corporate Organization and Control. The development of 
large scale production and the growth of corporate business; character- 
istic forms of industrial combination; state and federal regulatory legis- 
lation. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed or are taking course 
201. Three hours a week for the first semester. Miss Donnan. 

307. Industrial and Social Legislation. (Nwt given In 1924-25.) 
A study of Industrial and social conditions and their regulation by means 
of legislation. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed course 201 or 202. 
Three hours a week for the first semester. Mr. McBride. 



56 Courses of Instruction 

308. The Modern Labor Movement. A study of the contemporary 
labor situation with special reference to labor organizations. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed or are taking course 
201 and any other grade II course in Economics, Sociology, or History. 
Three hours a week for the first semester. Mr. Mussey. 

309. Money and Banking. The course deals mainly with the prin- 
ciples of money and banking, but it is also designed to give the student 
some acquaintance with the history and chief characteristics of typical 
modern systems of banking. 

Open to juniors a7id seniors zuho have completed or are taking course 
201. Three hours a week for the first semester. Mr. L. Smith. 

310. Public Finance. A study of the principles underlying public 
expenditures, borrowing, and taxation. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed or are taking course 
201. Three hours a week for the first semester. Mr. Mussey. 

313. Seminar: Selected Topics in the History of American Eco- 
nomic AND Social Movements and Theories. 

Open to seniors (and by special permission to juniors) who have com- 
pleted or are taking course 202 and either 204 or 312 or History 301. 
Three hours a week for the second semester. 

Miss Donnan, Miss Newell. 

314. Foreign Trade and Investment. The principles of international 
trade in their present application to the United States. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed course 306, 309, or 310. 
Three hours a week for the second semester. Mr. Mussey. 

Sociology 

202. Principles of Sociology. An introduction to the study of asso- 
ciation, — including consideration of the geographic, biologic, psychologic, 
and technic factors conditioning societal evolution and social progress. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed or are taking course 
101 and by special permission to juniors and seniors who have completed 
or are taking a second course in History or Government. Three hours 
a week for the first semester. Miss Newell. 

208. Social Economy. A study of the causes, characteristics, and 
social control of dependency and crime. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed course 202. Three 
hours a week for the second semester. Miss Newell. 



Economics and Sociology 57 

304. Municipal Sociology. The subject of this course is the Ameri- 
can city of to-day; its organization and its functioning to meet normal 
social needs. It includes such topics as housing, city planning, sanita- 
tion, recreation, education. 

Open to studnits who have completed or are tahmg course 202 and 
any other grade II course m Sociology, Economics, History, or Govern- 
ment. Three hours a week for the first semester. Mr. McBride. 

311. Social and Economic Investigation. A study of current 
methods of collecting, interpreting, and presenting statistical material 
relating to social and economic problems. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed or are taking course 
201 or 202. Three hours a week for a year. In 1924-25 the second 
semester will be open as a semester course to juniors and seniors who 
have completed Mathematics 204 and either Economics 201 or 202. 

Mr. W. B. Smith. 

312. The Family. A study of the origin, evolution, and current 
problems of the family as a social institution, emphasizing throughout the 
social and legal status of women as members of the family. 

Open to seniors (and in 1924-25 by special permission to juniors) who 
have covipleted or are taking course 202 and any other grade II course 
in Sociology, Economics, or History. Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss Newell. 

315. Immigration. A study of immigration into the United States, 
the elements represented, and their geographical distribution; the social, 
political, and economic influence of our foreign populations; the history 
of restrictive legislation, and the arrangements thus far provided for 
the reception and care of aliens. 

Open to seniors (and by special permission to juniors) who have com- 
pleted or are taking course 202 and any other grade II course in Sociology, 
Economics, or History. Three hours a week for the second semester. 

Mr. McBride. 

316. History of Social Theories. The course aims to acquaint the 
student with the development of sociological thought through a study 
of the special contributions of such writers as Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, 
Malthus, Comte, Spencer, Mill, Ratzel, Galton, Ward, Giddings, Ross, 

Wallas. 

Open to seniors (and in 1924-25 by special permission to juniors) who 
have completed or are taking course 202 and any other grade II course 
in Economics, Sociology, or History. Three hours a week for the second 
semester, Mr. McBride. 



58 Courses of Instruction 



EDUCATION 

Professors : Arthur Oruo Norton, M.A. (Chairman.) 
Anna Jane McKeag, Ph.D., LL.D. 
Lecturer : Matilda Remy. 

Assistant : Charles Sturtevant Moore, M.A. 
Graduate Assistant : Jennette Rowe GrLiener, B.A. 

The Deparlmcnt of Education offers both undergraduate and graduate courses. 
Six hours of work may be counted toward the B.A. degree. Full work for the 
M.A. degree is offered. 

201. Modern Education: Principles and Institutions. This course 
is organized to meet the needs not only of prospective teachers but also 
of all who are interested in the intelligent direction of education as a 
phase of civic or social service. It is a study of the practices, theories, 
and problems of modem education. The work of the course is illustrated 
throughout the year by visits to assigned schools for the observation of 
children and of class-room practice, and by examples of school work. 
Throughout this course the applications of Psychology to Education are 
considered and discussed. 

Open to juniors who have completed or who are taking the required 
course in Philosophy, and to seniors. Three hours a week for a year. 

Mr. Norton, Miss McKeag. 

202. History of Education. From the point of view of this course 
modern education appears as the outcome of a long series of historic 
events, the effects of which are visible in the ideals, studies, modes of 
teaching, and organization of our present schools, colleges, and univer- 
sities. The purpose of the year's work is to study in some detail the 
most important events in the history of European and American educa- 
tion, and their effects on the present course of educational affairs. The 
lectures are constantly illustrated by original manuscripts, facsimiles, 
early editions of noted text-books, and similar historical documents, by 
translations from the sources, and by numerous lantern slides. 

Open to juniors who have completed or are taking the required course 
in Philosophy, and to seniors. Graduates may elect this course under 
certain conditions. Three hours a week for a year. Mr. Norton. 

301. Secondary Education. The history and principles of secondary 
education, with special reference to the high schools of the United States. 
A study will be made of approved methods of teaching English, foreign 
languages, sciences, mathematics, and history in high schools. Oppor- 
tunity will be given for observation of the work of specially successful 
high school teachers in the subject which the student expects to teach. 
In connection with this course the department of Education requires 
from graduates a semester of systematic practice teaching in a high 



Education 59 

school, to be done as independent work, under the guidance of the de- 
partment and with the co-operation of the principal of the high school. 
Practice in teaching is not open to undergraduates. 

Open by permission to seniors who have completed a full course in 
Education, and to graduates. Three hours a week for a year. Students 
who take course 302 or 303 are permitted to count the first semester 
of 301 as a semester course. Miss McKeag. 

302. Principles and Problems of Religious Education. (Not offered 
in 1924-25.) The aims of religious education in the light of the funda- 
mental characteristics and present tendencies of Christianity. The reli- 
gious development of the individual. The selection and use of Biblical 
material for different ages. The Sunday school: its organization, curri- 
cula, and methods of teaching; its relation to the home. 

Open to seniors who have completed Education 201. Three hours a 
week for the second semester. 

303. Principles and Methods of Teaching French in Secondare 
Schools. (Not given in 1924-25.) The aim of this course is to teach 
the students how to impart to their pupils, in the shortest possible time, 
a speaking, understanding, reading, and writing knowledge of French. 
After a survey of the general difficulties arising from English habits of 
thought and of expression already formed, the instructor will deal with 
the several aspects of modern language work, such as the teaching of 
vocabulary, of grammar, of composition, and of translation; the selection 
and use of books, the correction and elimination of errors, the equipment 
of the teacher and of her department in the high school. 

Open to seniors who have completed or are taking French 305, and 
who have also completed Education 201. Students who take this course 
may also take the first semester of Education 301 as a semester course. 
Three hours a week for the second sem.ester. 

321. Problems in Education. (Not offered in 1924-25.) The sub- 
ject-matter of this course will vary from year to year in accordance with 
the equipment and needs of students. The topics for study will be 
chosen from the field of experimental or statistical investigation or from 
that of the general science of education. 

Open to graduates who have completed a full course in Education. 
Three hours a week for a year. Miss McKeag. 

322. The History, Theory, and Problems of the Kindergarten. 
The reconstruction of educational theories in the eighteenth and early 
nineteenth centuries. The relation of this reconstruction to the work of 
Froebel. The origins and history of the kindergarten movement in 
Europe and America. Exposition and criticism of theories of kinder- 



60 Courses of Instruction 

garten practice; modern developments; the reorganization of methods 
and materials of the kindergarten; the restatement of Froebelian princi- 
ples. The kindergarten and the primary school. 

Open to seniors and to graduates who have completed Philosophy 
101.102, or an equivalent, and one full course in Education. (Graduates 
must ordinarily take courses 322 and 323 together.) Three hours a week 
for a year. Miss Remy. 

323. Kindergarten Practice: Materials, Methods. Course 323 
deals in general with practical applications of the theory given in course 
322. It includes on the one hand a detailed study of the materials, 
devices, exercises, and methods of the kindergarten, and on the other, 
extensive observation of their use, with practice in teaching. 

Note. — Graduates must ordinarily take courses 322 and 323 together. 
They will occupy slightly less than two-thirds of the student's time for 
the year. Students who are preparing to conduct kindergartens or kinder- 
garten training classes are required to take a third course, usually in 
Education, to be determined on consultation with the chairman of the 
Department of Education. Ability to play on the piano the music of 
kindergarten songs and games is a prerequisite of these courses. 

Open to graduates who have completed Philosophy 101.102, or an 
equivalent, and one full course in Education (see note above). Four 
hours a week for a year. Miss Remy. 

324. Elementary Education: History, Theory, Practice, and 
Problems. (Not offered in 1924-25.) Course 324 includes a brief sur- 
vey of the history of elementary education in the United States, a de- 
tailed study of present elementary school practice, a critical discussion 
of the principles which underlie that practice, and the investigation of 
selected problems in elementary education. The purpose of the course 
is to give to each student a knowledge of existing conditions and prob- 
lems, some facility in handling the tools and methods of practical research 
in this field, and ability to formulate her views as to the ideas, scope, 
and work of the elementary schools. 

Open to graduates who have completed Philosophy 101, or an equiva- 
lent, and one full course in Education. Three hours a week for a year. 

325. History of Education. (Not offered in 1924-25.) This course 
covers the same periods in the history of education as course 202, but 
with additional reading, critical examination of the materials, and a 
detailed study of one or more topics from the sources. It is intended 
for graduate students who have had no general course in the history of 
education. 

Open to graduates who have completed a full course in Education. 
Three hours a week for a year. Mr. Norton. 



English 61 



ENGLISH 
I. English Literature 

Professors : Katharine Lee Bates. M.A.. Litt.D. 

ViDA DUTTON SCUDDER. M.A., L.H.D. 

Margaret Poluock Sherwood, Ph.D.. L.H.D. 
Alice Vinton Waite, M.A. 
Martha Haue Shackford. Ph.D. 
Laura Emma lockwood. Ph.D. (.Chairman.) 
Associate Professors : Charles Lowell Young. B.A. 

Martha Pike Conant, Ph.D. 
Alice Ida Perry Wood,* Ph.D. 
Laura Alandis Hibbard, Ph.D. 
Helen Sard Hughes. Ph.D. 
Elizabeth Wheeler Manwaring, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor : Annie Kimball Tuell, M.A. 
Visiting Professor: Margaret Lynn. M.A. 

Assistant : Alfarata Bowdoin Hilton, B.A. 

101. Outline History of English Literature. The course traces 
the essential outlines of English literary history, presents the leading 
types of prose and poetry, and gives training in critical appreciation. 
The work is conducted by lectures and by studies of selected masterpieces. 

Open to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors. Three hours a week for a 
year. Miss Tuell, Miss Lynn, Miss Conant, Miss Hughes. 

201. English Masterpieces. The course is intended to develop a 
sympathetic appreciation of literature through the study of chosen mas- 
terpieces. The work includes readings from Shakespeare, Scott, Jane 
Austen, Thackeray, Carlyle, Arnold, Ruskin, Wordsworth, Browning; 
ballads; short stories; and if time permits, some recent verse. 

Open only to seniors who have completed no full course in the depart- 
ment, or course 101 only. Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss Conant. 

202. American Literature. Ilie course attempts to give a compre- 
hensive account of American literature. It studies the Colonial and 
Revolutionary sources of American idealism, the rise of imaginative lit- 
erature in the Middle States, the florescence of Puritan culture in New- 
England, the achievement of democratic nationality in the mid-nineteenth 
century, the literature of the country at large after the Civil War, and 
contemporary literature, especially the new poetry. 

Open to students, except freshmen, who have completed or are taking 
a grade I course, and to all seniors. Three hours a week for a year. 

Mr. Young. 

204. Milton. The primary object of the course is the critical study 
of Milton as a master in lyric, epic, and dramatic poetry, and as a writer 

*Absent on leave for the first semester. 



62 Courses of Instruction 

of notable prose. The character and genius of the poet are considered 
as influenced by the political and religious conflict of the times. Special 
emphasis is placed on the comparison of Milton's work with that of 
other great writers who have used the same literary forms. 

Open to students, except freshmen, who have completed or are taking 
a grade I course. Three hours a week for a year. Miss Lockwood. 

205. The British Ballad. (Not offered in 1924-25.) The course 
studies the English and Scottish popular ballad and the modern literary 
ballad. Special attention will be given to folk-lore elements in the ballad 
and to the significance of the recent revival of interest in folk dance and 
story. 

Open to students, except freshmen, who have completed or are taking 
a grade I course. Three hours a week for the first semester. 

Miss Hibbard. 

206. The English Novel: The Rise of Types. The course deals 
with selected stages in the progress of the English novel, placing empha- 
sis upon Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, and Sterne. It treats chiefly 
the realistic novel; but makes some study of romance from Sidney to 
Scott. 

Open to students, except freshmen, who have completed or are taking 
a grade I course. Three hours a week for the second semester. 

Miss Tuell. 

207. Arthurian Romance. The course begins with those legends in 
ancient Celtic literature which influenced later Arthurian story, traces 
the historical development of Arthurian tradition through mediaeval 
chronicles and verse romances, and centers in the study of the sources 
and significance of Malory's Morte Darthur. 

Open to students, except freshmen, who have completed or are taking 
a grade I course. Three hours a week for the first semester. 

Miss Hibbard. 

208. Chaucer. The course emphasizes the study of Chaucer's life 
and times, of his development as a poet, and the influence upon him 
of his chief Latin, French, and Italian sources. 

Open to students, except freshmen, who have completed or are taking 
a grade I course. Three hours a week for the second semester. 

Miss Hibbard. 

209. Versification. The course has as its object such study of the 
principles of English versification as may give to the student of Utcrature 



English 63 

a keener appreciation of poetic expression; and in particular, for those 
interested in writing verse, opportunity for experiment and criticism. 

Ope7i to students, except freshmen, who have completed or are taking 
one full course in the department of English Literature, and also to those 
majoring in English Composition. One hour a week for a year. 

Miss Manwaring. 

301. Social Ideals in English Letters. Study of selected master- 
pieces from the social point of view. Rapid reading of ?iers Plowman 
More's Utopia, Swift's Gtdliver's Travels; more careful work with Burke 
and the Revolutionary poets, and with the prose and poetry of the 
Victorian Age. 

Open to seniors who have completed two full courses in English Lit- 
erature or Economics or History, or who have completed one fidl course 
in any of these departments and are taking another course. Three hours 
a week for a year. Miss Scudder. 

302. Tendencies of Tvv'entieth Century Poetry. The course pro- 
poses to point out the special significance, as related to the English tra- 
dition, of the work of certain contemporary English poets, especially 
those who have won distinction since 1900. 

Open only to juniors and seniors who have already completed two full 
courses in the department. One hour a week for a year. Miss Bates. 

303. ContemporarV Drama. The modern English drama is consid- 
ered in relation to parallel European drama. 

Open to students who have completed two full courses above grade I 
in the department. Two hours a week for a year. Miss Waite. 

304. Development of English Drama. (Not offered in 1924-25.) 
The course traces the history of English drama from the beginnings in 
folk plays and the liturgy of the Church, through the Miracles and 
Moralities, the Elizabethan dramatists, and the comedy and tragedy 
of the seventeenth and the eighteenth centuries, to the final development 
into contemporary forms. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed a grade I course, 
and have completed or are taking a full year course or two semester 
courses of grade U. Three hours a week for a year. Miss Wood. 

305. Shakespeare: Selected Plays. Close study of six plays, 
selected to illustrate Shakespeare's earlier and later work. The course 
emphasizes the literary study of Shakespeare. It gives opportunity for 
training in imaginative, scholarly, vital study of the text. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed a grade I course, and 
have completed or are taking a ftdl year course or two semester courses 
of grade II. Three hours a week for a year. Miss Conant. 



64 Courses of Instruction 

306. Victorian Prose. The course considers distinctive examples of 
Victorian prose, making a comparatively even division of time between 
the essay and the novel. The stress in class is laid upon Dickens, Car- 
lyle, Newman, Thackeray, George Eliot, Ruskin, Arnold, Meredith, with 
briefer study of the minor novelists, and some notice of Late Victorians. 

0-pen to juniors and seniors who have completed a grade 1 course, and 
have completed or are taking a full year course or two semester courses 
of grade II. Three hours a week for a year. Miss Tuell. 

307. English Poetry of the Nineteenth Century. The course 
considers the work of the great Georgian and Victorian poets in their 
relation to one another and to contemporary thought. Extended study 
is given to Wordsworth and Coleridge; Shelley and Keats; Tennyson and 
Browning; with briefer readings from Byron, Scott, Landor, Clough, 
Arnold, Rossetti, Morris, and Swinburne. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed a grade I course, and 
have completed or are taking a full year course or two semester courses 
of grade II. Three hours a week for a year. Miss Sherwood. 

308. Historical Development of English Literature. (Not offered 
in 1924-25.) The course traces the development of English literature 
from the time of Beowulf to the end of the Victorian age. It aims to 
focus attention upon successive phases of national thought and life as 
expressed in salient and representative books. 

Open to graduates, and required of seniors who are majoring in Eng- 
lish Literature and have not had course 101 or its equivalent. Three 
hours a week for a year. Miss Lockwood. 

309. Shakespeare. This course attempts to trace the development 
of Shakespeare's thought and art. All of the plays and the sonnets will 
be read and discussed; a few selected plays will be studied closely. 
Material illustrating the historical and the literary background will be 
considered. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed course 101, and have 
completed or are taking a full year course or two semester courses of 
grade II. Three hours a week for a year. Miss Shackford. 

310. Eighteenth Century Literature. The first semester will be 
devoted chiefly to the study of the writings of Addison, Steele, Swift, 
Pope, and Defoe; the second semester to Dr. Johnson and his circle. The 
emphasis will be laid on the rise and development of satire as related 
to political life, on the periodical and its popularity, on literary criticism, 
and on the relation between the poetry and prose of the century. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed a grade I course, and 
have completed or are taking a full year course or two semester courses 
of grade II. Three hours a week for a year. Miss Lockwood. 

321. Modern Authors. Two authors are chosen each year for special 



English 65 

study. In 1924-25 these authors will be Wordsworth and Browning. 
Open to graduates, and to approved seniors who are taking a twelve- 
hour major in the department . Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss Scudder. 

322. English Romanticism. A study of the Romantic Movement in 
England, from its beginnings in the eighteenth century, on through the 
work of the early nineteenth century poets. Certain phases of the rela- 
tion of English to German literature and to French literature during 
the period of reaction are studied. 

Open to graduates, and to approved seniors who are taking a twelve- 
hour major in the department. Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss Sherwood. 

323. Critical Studies in English Drama. The course attempts to 
give graduate training in literary investigation. To each student is as- 
signed some special problem of source, authorship, or the like, which she 
pursues until her conclusion is reached, reporting progress from week to 
week in the seminar. 

Open to graduates, and to approved seniors who are taking a twelve- 
hour major in the department. Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss Bates. 

324. Critical Studies in American Literature. The course is de- 
signed for advanced work in American literature. 

Open to graduates, and to approved seniors who are taking a twelve- 
hour major in the department. Three hours a week for a year. 

Mr. Young. 

325. Beginnings of the English Renaissance from Caxton to 
Shakespeare. (Not given in 1924-25.) The course aims to give gradu- 
ate training, and so to present the beginnings of the English Renaissance 
that the student may rightly estimate the achievements of the great 
Elizabethans. 

Open to graduates, and to approved seniors who are taking a twelve- 
hour major in the department. Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss Conant. 

326. Medieval English Literature. The course introduces students 
to the types of literature growing out of the social and religious move- 
ments of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. Extended study is 
given to the works of Chaucer and to the problems in criticism and 
scholarship to v/hich they give rise. 

Open to graduates, and to approved seniors who are taking a twelve- 
hour major in the department. Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss Hibbard. 

For course in Greek Literature in English Translations see Depart- 
ment of Greek. 



66 Courses of Instruction 

II. English Composition 

Professor : Sophie Chantal Hart. M.A. (Chairman.) 
Associate Professors : Agnes Frances Perkins, M.A. 

Josephine Harding Batchelder, M.A. 
Helen Sard Hughes, Ph.D. 
Alfred Dwight Sheffield,' M.A. 
Elizabeth Wheeler Manwaring, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor : Bertha Monica Stearns, M.A. 
Visiting Professor : Frances Melville Perry, M.A. 
Instructors : Elisabeth Wilkins Thomas. M.A. 
Elvira Slack, M.A. 
Edith Christina Johnson, M.A. 
Elizabeth Lois Mann, M.A. 
Esther Mohr McGill, M.A. 

lOlf. Required Freshman Composition. First semester: expository- 
writing, with emphasis on structure. Weekly themes. Second semester: 
expository writing, critical and interpretative; description; simple narra- 
tion. Fortnightly themes or their equivalent. 

Required of freshmen. Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss Perkins, Miss Batchelder, Miss Manwaring, 
Miss Stearns, Miss Thomas, Miss Slack, 
Miss Johnson, Miss Mann, Mrs. McGill. 

102. Continuation Course in Composition. 

Required of students who have made D grade in the second semester 
of course 101. Three hours a week for one semester. Miss Slack. 

201. Oral Exposition. (Not offered in 1924-25.) The analysis of 
contemporary subjects, and the preparation of written outlines and of 
speeches based upon them. 

Open to sophomores and juniors who have completed course 101. 
Three hours a week for the first semester. Mr. Sheffield. 

202. Special Types of Oral Exposition. (Not offered in 1924-25.) 
This course is a continuation of course 201. The work deals with the 
methods of organization and presentation in group discussion. 

Open to sophomores and juniors who have completed course 101. 
Three hours a week for the second semester. Mr. Sheffield. 

203. Studies in Journalistic Writing. A critical study of selected 
types of journalistic writing: the news story, the editorial, the book and 
play review, the "column," and the special article, as exemplified in 
some English and American newspapers. Fortnightly themes or their 
equivalent. 

Open to sophomores and juniors who have completed course 101. 
Three hours a week for the first semester. 

Miss Perkins, Miss Batchelder. 

'Absent on leave. 

tif a student submits papers notably deficient in English as part of her 
work, in any department, she may incur a condition in English Composition, 
whether or not she has completed the requirement in English Composition. 



English 67 

206. Practice Course in Writing. Free writing in varied types 
of composition adapted to the needs and interests of the individuals in 
the course. Fortnightly themes or their equivalent. 

Open to sophomores and juniors who have completed course 101. Three 
hours a week for the first semester. Miss Hughes, Miss Stearns. 

204. Studies in Contemporary Writing. This course is a continua- 
tion of either course 203 or course 206. Practice in the essay form, 
biography, the critical review, the sketch; the interpretative study of prose 
style. Fortnightly themes or their equivalent. 

Open to sophomores and juniors who have completed course 101. 
Three hours a week for the second semester. 

Miss Perkins, Miss Batchelder, 
Miss Hughes, Miss Stearns. 

205. Debate and Public Discussion. Technique of argumentation 
and debate. Training in deliberate speech-composition for the purpose 
of contributing towards the simplification, understanding, and solution of 
controversial questions. Practice in impromptu participation in assem- 
bly-discussions, advocating causes before audiences and meeting objec- 
tions, formal and informal team-debating. 

Open to sophomores and juniors who have completed course 101. Three 
hours a week for a year. Miss Perry. 

301. Narrative Writing. Four long pieces of narrative work. Study 
of principles and forms of narrative writing, including analysis of one 
novel. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed course 101. Two 
hours a week for the first semester. 

Miss Manwaring, Miss Perry. 

302. Short Themes. This course is a continuation of course 301. 
Practice in writing briefly on many sorts of subjects to increase supple- 
ness and precision of style, with especial consideration of diction and 
sentence form and rhythm. Short themes. Reading and class discussion 
of the theory and practice of various writers. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed course 101. Two 
hours a week for the second semester. 

Miss Manwaring, Miss Perry. 

303. The Theory and History of Criticism. Lectures on the critical 
theory of Plato and Aristotle and on the more important English and 
French critics. 

Open to juniors and seniors. One hour a week for a year. 

Miss Hart. 



68 Courses of Instruction 

304. Advanced Course in English Composition. Studies in expo- 
sition, description, and narration, with one piece of dramatization or an 
original play. Frequent practice in writing. 

Open to seniors who have completed courses 201.202, or 203 or 206 
followed by 204, or 205, or 301.302. Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss Hart. 



III. English Language 

Professor : Laura Emma Lockwood. Ph.D. CChairman.) 
Associate Professors : Alfred Dwight Sheffield.^ M.A. 

Emma Marshall Denkinger, Ph.D. 

301. Old English. (Not offered in 1924-25.) A study of the 
grammar and vocabulary of Old English. The reading of Beowulf and 
of selections from old English poetry and prose. 

Ope7i to juniors and seniors who have completed a year of language 
in college. Three hours a week for a year. Mr. Sheffield. 

302. History of the English Language. Origin and structure of 
the English Language in vocabulary, grammatical inflections, and syntax 
as the basis of modern usage. 

Open to juniors and seniors. Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss Denkinger. 

303. Seminar in Old English. A study of Old English inflections, 
phonology, and syntax. The reading of the best pieces of literature in 
Old English prose and poetry. A particular problem in either literature 
or language is assigned to each student for investigation. 

Open to graduates, and to seniors by permission of the department. 
Three hours a week for a year. Miss Denkinger. 

FRENCH 

Associate Professors : Henriette Andrieu. Agregee de l'Universite, 

(Chairman.) 
Marguerite Mespoulet, Agregee de l'Universite 
Assistant Professors : Eunice Clara Smith-Goard,' M.A. Lie. es Let. 

Ruth Elvira Clark. Litt.D. , ^ 

Visiting Lecturer : Marguerite Georges Weill. Agregee de l'Universite. 
Instructors : Dorothy Warner Dennis. B.A.. Dipl.E.U. 
Renee Jardin. Lie. ES Let.. Lie. en D. 

LUCIENNE FOUBERT ChAMBERLIN, C.S. (pARTIE FRANCAISE) 

Francoise Ruet, Lie ES Let., M.A. 
All courses beginning with conrse 101 are conducted in French. 

101$. Elementary Course. French phonetics, grammar, composi- 
tion, reading, exercises in speaking, and dictation. The course in- 

^Absent on leave. 

$First-year French may not be counted toward the B.A. degree if taken 
after the sophomore year, nor second-year French if taken after the junior 
year. French 101 and German 101 may not both be counted toward the B.A. 
degree. 



French 69 

eludes (1) a practical study of French pronunciation, phonetic drill; 
(2) the practical study of French grammar; (3) readings on French life 
and French institutions. 

Open to all undergraduates. Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss Dennis. 

102$. Intermediate Course. French phonetics, syntax, composi- 
tion; READINGS FROM CONTEMPORARY AUTHORS OF NOTE; EXERCISES IN 

speaking; WRITING FROM DICTATION. The coursc includes (1) a practical 
study of French pronunciation with phonetic drill; (2) a systematic re- 
view of syntax introductory to theme writing and oral narrative; (3) 
selected readings — prepared and sight — from modern writers. 

Open to all students who have completed course 101, or the two unit 
admission requirement in French. Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss Dennis. 

103. Third French Course. The aim of this course is the acquisi- 
tion by the student of a reasonable degree of proficiency in the use of 
spoken and written French, both as an end in itself and as a preparation 
for more advanced work in language and in literature. It includes a 
careful study of pronunciation, with phonetic drill; grammar and free 
composition, with frequent written exercises and themes; varied reading 
with the application of lecture expliquee methods; it affords opportunity 
for constant practice in the written and the spoken language. 

Open to students who have met the three unit admission requirement 
in French, also to those who have completed course 102. Three hours 
a week for a year. Miss Clark, Miss Jardin, 

Mrs. Chamberlin, Miss Ruet. 

201. Practical French; Translation, themes, and oral composi- 
tion. This course emphasizes fluency and flexibility in the use of the lan- 
guage. Together with the various kinds of work enumerated, it includes 
the careful study of selected passages of prose and poetry (lecture expli- 
quee) and more extensive reading. 

Open to students who have completed course 103 and, on recommen- 
dation of the department, to students who have completed course 102. 
Three hours a week for a year. Miss Ruet. 

202. Composition, Translation, Grammar, Phonetics. Weekly 
written exercises. The object of the course Is to provide additional prac- 
tice in the written and spoken language. 

Open to students who have completed course 103. One hour a week 
for a year. Miss Clark. 

$First-year French may not be counted toward the B.A. degree if taken 

after the sophomore year, nor second-year French if taken after the junior 

year. French 101 and German 101 may not both be counted toward the B.A. 
degree. 



70 Courses of Instruction 

203. Outline History of French Literature. A survey course, 
with illustrative reading. Intended primarily for students who do not 
expect to continue French in college. The survey is made as compre- 
hensive as possible. This course is not open to students who have com- 
pleted or are taking course 204. 

Open to students who have completed course 103, and, on recommen- 
dation of the department, to those who have completed 102. Three hours 
a week for a year. Miss Clark. 

204. Outline History of French Literature. A survey course, with 
illustrative reading. Intended primarily for students who expect to con- 
tinue the study of French in college. Emphasis on method rather than 
on comprehensiveness, in view of ulterior work. This course is not open 
to students who have completed or are taking course 203. 

Open to students who have completed course 103, and, on recommen- 
dation of the department, to students who have completed course 102. 
Three hours a week for a year. Miss Weill, 

30L The Classical Period of French Literature. As an intro- 
duction to this course, a short study Is made of the origin of French 
classicism; but the main object of the course Is the study of French 
society and the evolution of French classical literature during the seven- 
teenth century, in the works of the great dramatists and prose writers, 
including Descartes, Pascal; La Rochefoucauld, La Bruyere, Bossuet; 
Madame de Sevigne, Madame de Lafayette; La Fontaine, Bolleau; Cor- 
neille, Racine, Mollere. 

Open to students who have completed three hours of grade II, and to 
seniors who have completed or are taking three hours of grade II. Three 
hours a week for a year. Mrs. Andrieu. 

302. Literature of the Eighteenth Century and of the French 
Revolution. (Not offered In 1924-25.) This course aims to give a 
comprehensive view of the literature of the eighteenth century and of 
the period of the French revolution as exemplified in the works of certain 
representative philosophers, such as Montesquieu, Voltaire and Rousseau. 
It also includes a study of the comedies of Le Sage, Marivaux and Bcau- 
marchais. Special attention is given to the origin of romanticism In Rous- 
seau's work. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed three hours of grade 
II. Three hours a week for the first semester. Miss Jardin. 

303. Special Studies in the Nineteenth Century. (Not offered in 
1924-1925.) In 1925-1926 the subject will be an intensive study of the 
romantic drama, Its origin and evolution beginning with Alexandre Dumas 
pere, and its influence on contemporary drama in verse. The work in- 



French 71 

eludes the intensive study of certain plays of A. Dumas, Victor Hugo, 
A. de Vigny, A. de Musset, C. Delavigne, and A. Dumas, fils. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed three hours of grade 
II. Three hours a week for the second semester. 

Miss Mespoulet, Miss Jardin. 

304. Conversation and Journal Club. (Not offered in 1924-25.) 
Oral reports, reviews, and discussion of important magazine articles, to- 
gether with a short account, usually at each meeting of the class, of cur- 
rent events in France. The aim of the course is twofold: practice in the 
use of the spoken language, and a brief study of the France of today and 
of French institutions. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed or are taking a grade 
III course. One hour a week for a year. Miss Smith-Goard. 

305. Intensive Reading. The object of this course consists in the 
intensive study of a limited number of subjects drawn from the great 
periods of French literature. Each subject, in accordance with an estab- 
lished method, is treated from the point of view of linguistics (oral pres- 
entation, phonetic training, composition, style) and from the point of 
view of literature (outside reading, class discussion, explication de texte) . 

Open to seniors who have completed nine hours of French beginning 
with course 103, or who are taking a grade III course. Three hours a 
week for a year. Miss Weill. 

306. Nineteenth Century Literature. A study of the romantic 
movement in the works of Chateaubriand, Madame de Stael, Bernardin de 
Saint-Pierre and especially of the great lyric poets: Lamartine, Hugo, 
Vigny, Musset; and of the poets of the Parnasse. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed three hours of grade 
II. Three hours a week for a year. Miss Mespoulet. 

307. Contemporary French Literature. A study of the poets and 
of the prose writers from the end of the nineteenth century up to the 
present time. 

Open to seniors who have completed either course 301 or courses 302 
and 303. Three hours a week for a year. Miss Mespoulet. 

308. Studies in Style. (Not offered in 1924-25.) This course is re- 
lated to course 307. 

Open to students who have completed course 202. One hour a week 
for a year. 

321. Old French and Old French Literature. (Not offered In 
1924-25.) Phonology with reading of La Vie de St. Alexis, La Chanson 
de Roland, Aucassin et Nicolete, Chretien de Troyes. Gaston Paris: 
Extraits des Chroniqueurs franQais. Selections from Constans: Chres- 



72 Courses of Instruction 

tomathie de I'ancien frangais. The history of the French language is 
traced from its origin to the present time, and illustrated by texts read. 
For reference, Darmesteter: Grammaire Historique; Gaston Paris: 
Manuel de la litterature frangaise du moyen age; also standard works on 
the subject in the college library. Lectures, critical reading. 

Open to graduates and to seniors by permission of the department. 
Three hours a week for a year. 

322. Old Provenqal. (Not offered in 1924-25.) This course is com- 
plementary to course 321. Together these courses mark the synchronic 
lines of development of the langue d'oil and the langue d'oc. 

Open to graduate students only. 

Graduate Work 

The department is prepared to direct research work for graduate stu- 
dents in special subjects in Old French and Old French literature, also 
in modern French language and literature. 



GEOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY 



Professor 



Associate Professor 

Assistant Professor 

Lecturer 



Elizabeth Florette Fisher.' B.S. 



Mary Jean Lanier. Ph.D. (Acting Chairman.) 
Margaret Terrell Parker, M.A. 
Hervey Woodburn Shimer, Ph.D.. Sc.D. 
Instructor i Kenneth Knight Landes. M.A. 
Assistant : Helen Frances Holmes, B.A. 



101. General Geology. First Semester — Physiography. A study of 
the work which wind, waves, rivers, glaciers, volcanoes, and earth move- 
ments have done and are doing to shape the earth's surface. This study 
explains the origin of hills and valleys, of plains, plateaus and moun- 
tains, of continents and ocean basins, and makes clear the ways in 
which these surface features have affected man's life on the earth. Second 
Semester — Historical Geology. The origin of the earth and its history 
from the time of its origin until the present. The evolution of life on the 
earth traced from its earliest known appearance through its recent devel- 
opment. Lectures and recitations are accompanied by parallel studies in 
the laboratory and by field and museum excursions. 

Open to all undergraduates. Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss Lanier, Miss Parker, Mr. Shimer, Mr. Landes. 

Geology 

201. Earth Evolution. The origin and evolution of the earth and 
the life on it as revealed by a study of the rocks of past geologic ages 
and the fossils they contain. The study includes an explanation of the 
earth's present surface features, and of the processes by which they have 

^Absent on leave. 



Geology and Geography 73 

been formed and are now being modified. Lectures, class discussions, 
laboratory and field work. 

Open to juniors and seniors. Not open to students who have com- 
pleted course 101. Three hours a week for the first semester. 

Miss Parker. 

202. Economic Mineralogy". A study of the minerals which are 
noteworthy either because they are essential constituents of rocks, or be- 
cause they are of value economically. The treatment will include a study 
of the principles of crystallography; the sight recognition of minerals by 
means of their physical properties; the mode of occurrence of those min- 
erals; the uses to which they are put industrially; the geographic loca- 
tion of important mineral deposits, with emphasis upon political control 
of mineral resources. 

Open to students who have completed course 101 or 201. Three hours 
a week for the first semester. Mr. Landes. 

203. Petrography. (Not offered in 1924-25.) A study of the macro- 
scopic characters of the more important igneous, sedimentary, and meta- 
morphic rocks. Theories of modern petrology. Lectures, class discus- 
sions, and laboratory work. 

Open to students who have completed course 202. Three hours a week 
for the second semester. 

30L Field Geology. (Not given in 1924-25.) Advanced field study 
of the region including the Boston Basin and areas immediately sur- 
rounding it. The course attempts to train the student to determine and 
to interpret independently the physiographic and structural geology of 
the region studied. It deals further with the relation between the physi- 
cal features of the area and its economic and commercial development. 
Field study is accompanied by lectures, class discussions, and laboratory 
work. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed course 101 and a grade 
II course, or course 201. Three hours a week for the second semester. 

Mr. Shimer. 

305. Seminar in Geology and Geography. (See Geography 305.) 

306. Paleontology. (Not given in 1924-25.) The course deals with 
the facts and problems of organic evolution, as revealed by the life of past 
geologic ages. By means of a study of fossils the steps In the develop- 
ment from simple, generalized life forms to more complex and specialized 
types are traced. The effects of physical environment upon life develop- 
ment are emphasized. Lectures, class discussions and laboratory work. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed Zoology 101 or 
Botany 201, and either Geology 101 or 201. Three hours a week for the 
first semester. Mr. Shimer. 



74 Courses of Instruction 

Geography 

204. Climates of the World. A study of the relations of climate to 
man. The course is designed to give an understanding of the elements 
and the controls of climate; the characteristics of the leading types of 
climate and the distribution of those types throughout the world; the ways 
in which climate influences the economic development of regions. 

Open to juniors and seniors and to sophomores who have completed 
course 101. To count toward a major in the department but not to count 
toward the science requirement. Three hours a week for the first 
semester. Miss Lanier. 

205. Industrial and Commercial Geography. A study of world 
production and world trade as influenced by geographic factors. The 
course gives the student an understanding of the geographic conditions 
which favor the development of the various types of industries, the areas 
which furnish the important commercial products and the conditions of 
their production; the geographic basis of trade and the great continental 
and ocean trade routes; the location and growth of commercial centers; 
types of commercial nations. 

Open to students who have completed course 204. To count toward a 
major in the department, but not to count toward the science require- 
ment. Three hours a week for the second semester. Miss Lanier. 

206. Conservation of Our Natural Resources. A study of the 
natural resources of the United States and the efficient use of these re- 
sources. The course includes the study of the need for reducing soil 
waste, supplying fertilizers for worn-out soil, reclaiming swamp and arid 
lands, Increasing agricultural production and conserving mineral fuels and 
metals, and of the methods of attaining these results. The course further 
deals with problems of forest protection, water supply, control of water 
power, and the use of Inland waterways. The course helps to establish 
principles of good citizenship. 

Open to juniors and seniors, and to sophomores who have completed 
course 101. To count toward a major in the department but not to 
count toward the science requirement. Three hours a week for the second 
semester. Miss Lanier. 

302. Geographic Influences in the Development of the United 
States. Regional geography of the United States in its physical, eco- 
nomic, commercial, and historical aspects, including a study of the rela- 
tion of the continent to the world as a whole, and the influence of Its 
natural resources upon Its Industrial development and upon the course of 
American History. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed either course 101 and 
a grade II course in the department, or course 201. Three hours a week 
for the first semester. Miss Lanier. 



German 75 

303. Geographic Influences in the Development of Europe, 
A study of the geographic factors which have been important in deter- 
mining, in Europe, the early rise of civilization, the distribution of races, 
the origin and relative importance of the various political units, and the 
economic development of each of the several countries. The course will 
include a survey of the more important geographic principles underlying 
the recent treaty settlement of European boundaries. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed course 101 and a 
grade II course in the department, or course 201. Three hours a week 
for the second semester. Miss Parke!r. 

304. Geographic Influences in the Development of South 
America. A study of the physiographic features, climates, and resources 
of South America; the influence of these factors upon the colonization of 
the continent by Europeans, upon the formation of independent political 
units, and upon the present and possible future economic development of 
the various countries. 

Open to jimiors and seniors who have completed course 101 and a 
grade II course in the department, or course 201. Three hours a week 
for the first semester. Miss Lanier. 

305. Seminar in Geology and Geography. The course begins with 
a study of the methods of individual research. Early in the course a 
selected topic is assigned to each student for investigation and reports 
of the individual work are presented weekly. The student may choose a 
geographic problem or a geologic problem as she prefers. 

Open to graduate students and to approved seniors. Three hours a 
week for the second semester. Miss Parker,. 

GERMAN 

Professor : Natalie Wippunger, Ph.D. (Chairman.) 
Instructor : Louise Habermeyer. 
Assistant : Elisabeth Biewend. 

101$. Elementary Course. Grammar, reading, oral and written 
exercises. The texts used in this course are made the basis for a study 
of grammatical forms and rules, for speaking exercises and composition 
work. Frequent written exercises are required. 

Open to all students. Three hours a week for a year. 

Mrs. Biewend. 

102$. Elementary Course. Reading, free reproduction, written 
and oral exercises, short themes, memorizing of poems. The methods 

JFirst-year German may not be counted toward the B.A. degree if taken 
after the sophomore year, nor second-year German if taken after the junior 
year. German 101 and French 101 may not both be counted toward the B.A. 
degree. 



76 Courses of Instruction 

are the same as in course 101. In connection with the reading special 
attention is given to the learning of the more common idioms. Some pages 
of easy reading are required outside of the regular class assignments. 
Several poems are memorized. Frequent written tests or short themes 
are required. Course 102 is intended to fit students to enter courses 201, 
202. 

Open to all students who have completed course 101 or the two unit 
admission requirement in German. Three hours a week for a year. 

Mrs. Biewend. 

103. Grammar and Composition. (Not given in 1924-25). Review 
of elementary grammar and study of more advanced grammar. Bi-weekly 
themes; grammatical exercises based on texts read in course 104. 

Open to freshmen who have met the three unit admission requirement 
in German, and required in connection with course 104. Course 103 can- 
not be taken without course 104. One hour a week for a year. 

Miss Habermeyer. 

104. Outline History of German Literature. (Not given in 
1924-25). The object of this course is to furnish the student with the 
vocabulary necessary for the reading and discussion of literature, and to 
give her a general historical background for the more detailed study of 
German literature in subsequent courses. Texts used: Stroebe and Whit- 
ney. History of German Literature, Wenckebach's Meisterwerke, Goethe's 
Dichtung und Wahrheit (Jagemann). 

Open to freshmen who have met the three unit admission requirement 
in German, and required in connection with course 103. Course 104 can- 
not be taken without course 103. Two hours a week for a year. 

Miss Habermeyer. 

201. Grammar and Composition. The aim of this course is to give 
the student practice in oral and written expression. Bi-weekly themes; 
grammatical exercises based on the material treated in course 202. 

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have completed course 
102 or equivalent, and required of those taking course 202. Course 201 
cannot be taken without course 202. One hour a week for a year. 

Mrs. Biewend. 

202. History of German Literature. The course consists of dis- 
cussions, reading, and occasional lectures on the history of German 
literature before Goethe. The aim of the course is to trace the parallel 
development of the language, literature, social conditions, and religious 
ideals of the times. 

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have completed course 
102 or equivalent, and required in connection with course 201. Course 
202 cannot be taken without course 201. Two hours a week for a year. 

Miss Wipplinger. 



German 77 

204. Schiller's Life and Works (Introductory Course). Lectures, 
discussions. Study of Schiller's life and some of his important dramatic 
v/orks. Texts: Boyesen's Schiller's Life; Die Rduber (Cotta); Wallen- 
stein (Carruth); Schiller's Gedichte (Cotta); Schiller's Briefe (Kiihne- 
mann). 

Ope7i to students who have completed courses 103, 104, or 201, 202. 
Three hours a week for the first semester. Miss Wipplinger. 

205. Goethe's Life and Works (Introductory Course). Lectures, 
discussions. Study of the principal characteristics of Goethe's life and 
works to the time of his literary co-operation with Schiller. 

Open to students who have completed course 204. Three hours a week 
for the second semester. Miss Wipplinger. 

206. German Lyrics and Ballads. (Not offered in 1923-24.) His- 
torical study of Minnegesang, Volkslied, and the principal lyric poets up 
to the present day. 

Open to students who have completed courses 103, 104 or 201, 202, and 
are taking other work in German. One hour a week for a year. 

207. Studies in Modern German Idiom. This course Is designed to 
aid the student in acquiring a larger working vocabulary. Modern Ger- 
man texts are used as a basis of study. Constant oral and frequent writ- 
ten practice. 

Open to students taking other work in German, who have completed 
courses 103, 104, or 201, 202, ayid by special permission to those who 
have completed course 102. One hour a week for a year. 

Miss Habermeyer. 

301. The German Novel. Historical development of the German 
novel since Goethe. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed or are taking three 
hours of grade 11. Two hours a week for a year. 

Miss Wipplinger. 

302. History of the German Language. (Not offered in 1924-25.) 
This course aims to give a fuller and more thorough understanding of 
modern German through the study of its historical development. Text- 
book: Behagel's Die deutsche Sprache. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed three hours of grade 
II and are taking other work in German. One hour a week for a year. 

303. Middle High German (Introductory Course). (Not offered in 
1924-25.) Survey of Middle High German forms and sounds. Transla- 
tion of Middle High German epic and lyric poetry into the modern idiom. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed at least three hours 
of grade II. Three hours a week for the second semester. 



78 Courses of Instruction 

304. Goethe's Faust, Part I. Study of the pre-Goethean develop- 
ment of the Faust legend in its more important literary forms. Close 
study of the text of Goethe's Faust, Part I. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed courses 204. 205. 
Three hours a week for the first semester. Miss Wipplinger. 

305. The German Romantic School. A study of the development and 
spirit of the German Romantic School. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed course 304. Three 
hours a week for the second semester. Miss Wipplinger, 

306. Lessing as Dramatist and Critic (Seminary Course). (Not 
offered in 1924-25.) Treatment of Lesslng's critical work in literature, 
theology, and aesthetics. Works read and discussed are: Minna von 
Barnhelm, Emilia Galotti, Nathan der Weise, Die Hamburgische Drama- 
turgic, Laokoon, Axiomata, Jnti-Gotze, Erziehung des Menschenge- 
schlechts. Reference books: Erich Schmidt's Lessing, Kuno Fischer's 
Lessing als Reformator der deutschen Literatur, Kuno Fischer's Lessin^s 
Nathan, and others. 

Open to seniors who have completed three hours of grade III, and 
to others by special permission. Three hours a week for the second 
semester. Miss Wipplinger. 

307. Goethe, Advanced Course (Seminary Course). Study of 
Goethe's lyrics, ballads, later dramas, parts of Faust II, Wilhelm Meister. 

Open to seniors who have completed course 304 and at least one other 
three-hour semester course of grade III; students not taking course 304 
till the senior year, may by special permission enter course 307. Three 
hours a week for the first semester. Miss Wipplinger. 

308. Nineteenth Century Drama. Special study of Kleist, Grill- 
parzer, Hebbel, Ibsen, Hauptmann, and others; their relation to classic 
and romantic art, and to the social and philosophical problems of the 
century. 

Open to seniors who have completed course 307. Three hours a week 
for the second semester. Miss Wipplinger. 

309. Schiller as Philosopher and Writer on Esthetics (Seminary 
Course). (Not offered in 1924-25.) Study of Schiller through his cor- 
respondence with Korner, Goethe, etc., and his philosophic-aesthetic poems 
and essays. These are read and discussed in class. 

Open to seniors who have completed course 204 and at least three 
hours of grade III. Three hours a week for the first semester. 

310. Gothic (Not offered in 1924-25.) 

Open to graduates and to seniors by permission of the instructor. Three 
hours a week for the second semester. 



Greek 79 



GREEK 

Professor : Katharine May Edwards. Ph.D. (Chairman.) 
Instructor : Anita Elisabeth Klein, M.A. 

101. Beginning Greek. The aim of the course is to cover in one 
year the fundamental facts of Greek grammar with practice in reading 
and writing. The text-book is Allen's First Year in Greek. The longer 
selections for reading are from Plato, but quotations from other master- 
pieces of prose and poetry are Included. 

Open to all students. Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss Edwards, Miss Klein. 

201. Second Year Greek. First semester: Plato; Apology and selec- 
tions from other dialogues. Second semester: Homer, Selected books of 
Iliad or Odyssey. 

Open to students who have completed course 101 or the two unit admis- 
sion requirement in Greek. Three hours a week for a year. Miss Klein. 

202. Plato: Apology and selections from other dialogues; Homer: 
Odyssey (six or seven books); Euripides: one drama. 

Open to students who have met the three unit admission requirement 
in Greek. Three hours a week for a year. Miss Klein. 

203. Greek Literature in English Translations. The class will 
read in translation selections from the works of the Greek poets, from 
Homer to Theocritus. Lectures on the development of Greek literature 
and class-discussions will accompany the reading. Special emphasis will 
be placed upon Greek drama, and as many plays as possible will be read 
and studied. 

Open to juniors and seniors, and to sophomores who have completed 
one full course in Greek, or Art, or English Literature. Three hours a 
week for the first semester. Miss Edwards. 

301. Fifth Century Dramatists and Historians. Reading and 
study of dramas of ^Eschylus, Sophocles and Euripides, at least one of 
each, preceded by rapid reading, partly In class, of selections from 
Herodotus (Battles of Thermopylae and Salamis) and Thucydldes 
(Democracy of Athens). 

Open to students who have completed course 201 or 202. Three hours 
a week for a year. Miss Edwards. 

302. Greek Lyric Poetry. Special study of the poems of Sappho and 
Alcseus; Pindar and Bacchylides; Theocritus. Lectures on development of 
Greek Lyric Poetry. Reading of Plato's Ion and Aristotle's Poetics. 

Open to students who have completed course 301. Three hours a week 
for a year. Miss Edwards. 



80 Courses of Instruction 

303. Homeric Seminary. (Not offered in 1924-25.) Critical study of 
selected portions of the Iliad, with discussions and lectures on special 
problems. 

Open to students who have completed course 301. Three hours a week 
for a year. Miss Edwards. 

304. Greek Dialects. (Not offered in 1924-25.) A comparative 
study of the Greek dialects, their characteristics and their relations to 
each other, with reading and study of inscriptions and selected texts. 

Open to students who have completed one full course of grade III. 
Three hours a week for a year. Miss Edwards. 

305. Modern Greek. (Not offered in 1924-25.) The course has two 
objects: first, a practical one, to give some acquaintance with the spoken 
and written Greek of to-day; second, a linguistic one, to trace the his- 
torical development of the language from classical times to the present. 

Open to students who have completed one full course of grade III. 
One hour a week for a year. Miss Edwards. 

306. Introduction to the Science of Language. (Not offered In 
1924-25.) Lectures on the origin and nature of language and the prin- 
ciples of Its life and growth; outline studies In phonetics; classification of 
languages; groups of the Indo-European languages with chief character- 
istics. 

Open to seniors and juniors who have had one year of Greek. One 
hour a week for a year and an additional hour in alternate weeks. To 
count as one and one-half hours. Miss Edwards. 

For courses in the study of Greek Testament see Biblical History. 

HISTORY 

Professors : Julia Swift Orvis. Ph.D. (Chairman.) 
Mabel Elisabeth Hodder. Ph.D. 
Associate Professors : Edna Virginia Moffett, Ph.D. 

Barnette Miller.' Ph.D. 
Edward Ely Curtis, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professors : Judith Blow Williams, Ph.D. 

Phillips Bradley. B.A. 
Instructor : Waldo Emerson Palmer. B.A. 

103. History of Western Europe from the Fifth Century to 
THE Congress of Vienna. A general survey of the history of Western 
Europe from the decline of Rome to 1815. The course aims to train 
students in methods of historical work and to furnish a background for 
the detailed study of particular periods. 

Open to all undergraduates. This course is prerequisite to later elec- 
tion. Three hours a week for a year. 

Mrs. Hodder, Miss Moffett, Miss Williams, Mr. Palmer. 

^Absent on leave. 



History 81 

201. History of Europe since the French Revolution. This 
course includes (1) an introductory discussion of the condition of France 
on the eve of the Revolution; (2) a study of the Revolution and the 
Napoleonic Era; (3) a study of the influence of revolutionary ideas in 
the subsequent history of Europe. 

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have completed one full 
course in History. Three hours a week for a year. Miss Orvis. 

202. Constitutional History of England to 1399. (Not offered 
in 1924-25.) A study of the development of English constitutional gov- 
ernment as an expression of the character of the English people. The 
course deals with Germanic origins, and with the development of English 
thought along constitutional lines to the close of the Plantagenet period. 

Open to students who have completed one full course in History. 
Three hours a week for the first semester. Miss Moffett. 

203. Constitutional History of England from 1399 to the Pres- 
ent Time. (Not offered in 1924-25.) A study of the later development 
of the English constitution, the rise of party and cabinet government, and 
the actual working of the constitution to-day. 

Open to students who have completed one full course in History. 
Three hours a week for the second semester. Miss Moffett. 

204. History of Rome. This course offers a general survey of Roman 
History. The attempt is made to present the problems of recent scholar- 
ship In the study of the earlier period, but the main emphasis is placed 
upon the later Republic and the Empire. Particular attention will be 
given to economic and social conditions, and to the development of the 
Roman system of government. 

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have completed one col- 
lege course in History, or who are giving special attention to Latin or 
Greek or Economics. Three hours a week for a year. Mrs. Hodder. 

205. Colonial America, a. Age of Discovery and Conquest, b. The 
American Revolution. After surveying the discovery and exploration of 
America in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the course deals with 
the foundation and growth of the British Empire in America. Emphasis 
is laid upon British colonial policy and administration. The second 
semester Is devoted mainly to a consideration of the American Revolu- 
tion, attention being directed to the problems of British statesmanship 
and the European background. In 1925-26 this will be offered as a 
semester course. 

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have completed or are 
taking a full course in History. Three hours a week for a year. 

Mr. Curtis. 



82 Courses of Instruction 

206. The Government of the United States. Emphasis will be given 
to the development of the National Government, its expanding powers, 
and the newer ideals which western expansion and International relations 
have crystallized into national policies. A short study of the major 
governments of Europe will be made the basis for a comparative analysis 
of our political institutions. 

Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors who have completed History 
103, or Economics 101. Three hours a week for a year. 

Mr. Bradley. 

207. Geography of European History. Besides the study of the 
more important changes of boundaries, including those made by the most 
recent treaties, the course will attempt to strengthen the connection be- 
tween events and localities, by noting the characteristics and the role in 
History of certain parts of Europe. 

Open to all seniors and to juniors and sophomores who have com- 
pleted one full course in History. Three hours a week for the first 
semester. Miss Moffett. 

208. International Politics. (Not offered in 1924-25.) The object 
of this course is to give a general view of International conditions since 
the close of the Bismarck period, with especial reference to the present 
relations of Europe, America, and Asia. 

Open to all seniors and to juniors who have completed or are taking a 
full course in History. Three hours a week for the second semester. 

Miss Miller. 

209. Political History of Russia from the earliest times to the 
present. (Not offered in 1924-25.) This course includes a study of (1) 
the forces which made Russia a world power, (2) the development and 
policy of the autocracy, and (3) the struggle for freedom, culminating in 
the revolution of 1917, and Its consequences. 

Open to all seniors, and to juniors who have completed or are taking 
another course in History. Three hours a week for the first semester. 

Miss Orvis. 

210. Medi/eval Life and Institutions. (Not offered In 1924-25.) 
The aim of the course is to show the points of contact and of difference 
between the modern spirit and the medlseval, as well as to serve as a 
background for the study of modern history, or of mediaeval art or litera- 
ture. It covers the period from the fourth to the close of the fourteenth 
century, emphasizing those phases of mediaeval life which have left the 
strongest impress, and dealing with some of the great personalities whose 
work Is still vital. A few mediaeval sources are read. 

Open to students who have completed course 103. Three hours a week 
for a year. Miss Moffett. 



History 83 

211. Municipal Government and Administration. The structure, 
functions, and activities, of modern city governments. There will be 
some comparison with local government abroad, but special emphasis 
will be laid on present tendencies in American city government, recent 
developments in organization, and the achievements of "Municipal Re- 
form" in producing efficiency in administration. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed one full course in 
History or Economics. Three hours a week for the first semester. 

Mr. Bradley. 

212. Party Government and Machinery. The growth of parties 
In the United States— their present organization and activities. A com- 
parison of the American and British two-party system with the multiple 
party system of Continental Europe will distinguish the effects of each 
system on the actual control of government by the people. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed one full course in 
History or Economics. Three hours a week for the second semester. 

Mr. Bradley. 

213. History of England and Greater Britain. A general survey 
of English History with especial emphasis upon those political, social and 
economic forces which have led to the expansion of England and to the 
position and problems of the British Empire of to-day. 

Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors who have completed one full 
course in History. Three hours a week for a year. Miss Williams. 

214. The Rise of the Spanish American Republics. (Not offered 
1924-1925.) After surveying the exploration and conquest of the New 
World by the Spaniards, this course treats Spanish colonial policy with 
a view to explaining the causes of the revolutionary movement. The 
latter part of the course Is devoted to the wars of liberation and the 
emergence of the present republics. 

Open to students who have completed course 103, also open without 
prerequisite to sophomores, juniors and seniors who are majoring in 
Spanish. Three hours a week for the second semester. Mr. Curtis. 

301. History of the United States from- 1787 to the Present 
Time. A study of the formation and development of the constitution of 
the United States, with special reference to controlling forces, such as 
the organization of parties, the growth of democracy, the rise of the slave 
power, the political effect of the development of the West. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed one full course and 
have completed or are taking a second course in History. Three hours 
a week for a year. Mr. Curtis, 



84 Courses of Instruction 

302t. Europe in Renaissance and Reformation. (Not offered In 
1924-25.) A study of the intellectual, religious, and social life of the fif- 
teenth and sixteenth centuries. In the first semester the Renaissance in 
Italy and France is emphasized, and in the second semester the Reforma- 
tion and the Age of Elizabeth. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed two full courses in 
History, or one course in History and two courses in Art. Three hours 
a week for a year. Miss Moffett. 

304$. England under the Tudors and Stuarts. This course deals 
with the religious and constitutional struggles in the sixteenth and seven- 
teenth centuries, with economic and social changes, international relations, 
and with the founding of the British Empire. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed two full courses in 
History. Three hours a week for a year. Mrs. Hodder. 

305. Diplomatic History of Europe since 1740. This course in- 
cludes (1) a review of the period 1648-1740; (2) the age of Frederick 
II; (3) a Survey of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic period; (4) the 
age of Bismarck and its results. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed two full courses in 
History. Three hours a week for a year. Miss Orvis. 

306. Growth of the British Empire. (Not offered in 1924-25.) 
This course Includes (1) a historical review of the development of the 
empire; (2) a study of the changes of colonial policy; (3) a study of 
colonial administration; and (4) a discussion of present colonial and 
Imperial problems. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed two full courses in 
History. Three hours a week for the first semester. 

307. American Foreign Relations. This course deals with the most 
significant diplomatic problems which have arisen as the result of war, 
westward expansion, the growth of foreign commerce, Immigration, and 
the acquisition of colonial possessions. The origin of Important treaties, 
the development of the Monroe Doctrine, and the evolution of the United 
States Into a world power will be traced. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed two full courses in 
History. Three hours a week for a year. Mr. Curtis. 

308. History of Political Institutions. (Not offered in 1924-25.) 
This is an introductory course in the comparative study of the origin, 
character, development, and aim of political institutions. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed two full courses in 
History. Three hours a week for a year. 

tHistory 302 will alternate with History 309. 
JHistory 304 will alternate with History 310. 



History 85 

309t. Selected Studies in Medieval History. The course is de- 
signed to give training in methods of historical research, using the medi- 
aeval period as a field. 

Open to graduates and seniors, and to approved juniors who have 
completed course 103 and one other full course in the department. Three 
hours a week for a year. Miss Moffett. 

310$. The Development of Thought from Classic Times through 
THE Middle Ages: A Study of the Evolution of the Medieval Mind. 
(Not offered in 1924-25). This course treats of Greek thought and its 
expression, its transformation in Latin hands, the culture of the early- 
Christian centuries, and the later development of the medieval genius. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed History 103 and one 
other three-hour course in History. Three hours a week for a year. 

Mrs. Hodder. 

311. Social and Cultural History of Europe. A course in the 
evolution of civilization, tracing the development of culture from early 
times through the rise of the Mediterranean civilizations, the Middle Ages, 
the Renaissance and modern times and covering the more important 
phases of social, economic and intellectual life. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed two full courses in 
History, Three hours a week for a year. Miss Williams. 

312. Constitutional Law in the United States. This course will 
deal with the effect of the power of judicial review on the actual progress 
of our national life, especially in its economic and social aspects. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed one full course and 
have completed or are taking a second course in History. For one His- 
tory course a course in Economics may be substituted. Three hours a 
week for the first semester. Mr. Bradley. 

313. International Law. The problem of international relations as 
viewed by the diplomat and jurist. Discussion of cases will be supple- 
mented by readings from the leading authorities and the decision of 
hypothetical questions based on actual historical events. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed one full course and 
have completed or are taking a second course in History. For one His- 
tory course a course in Economics may be substituted. Three hours a 
week for the second semester. Mr. Bradley. 

314. Selected Problems in Government. (Not given in 1924-25.) 
The course will deal with special problems from a comparative view- 
point. Such questions as the status and functions of second chambers, 

tHistory 309 will alternate with History 302. 
JHistory 31Q will alternate with History 304. 



86 



Courses of Instruction 



the position of the civil service, proportional representation, the govern- 
ment of dependencies, and international administration will be considered 
in the light of actual and proposed solutions in different countries. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed two full courses in 
History. Three hours a week for a year. Mr. Bradley. 

HYGIENE AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Professors 



Associate Professors 

Resident Physician 

Lecturer 

Instructors 



Mabel Louise Cummings. B.S.. 

director of the department. 
William Skarstrom. M.D. 
Eugene Clarence Howe, Ph.D. 
Katharine Piatt Raymond. B.S.. 



M.D. 



Assistants 



Recorder 

Librarian 

Secretary 

Special Lecturers 



William Henry Geer, B.S.. B.P.E. 

Margaret Johnson. 

Mary Sophie Haagensen. 

Caroline Whitehouse Coleman, B.A. 

Charlotte Genevieve MacEwan. B.S. 

Fanny Garrison, B.A. 

Helen Mary Thompson. 

Emma Fuller Waterman, B.A. 

Annie Chapin Stedman. 

Florence Avery Pinkerton, B.S. 

lucinda hulbert rice, b.s. 

Alice Irene Mandell, Ph.B. 

Agnes Emma Dodge. 

Anna Elizabeth Anderson. 

Walter Adams Bradford, D.M.D., 

LECTURER ON ORAL HYGIENE. 

Joseph William Courtney M.D., 

LECTURER ON THE HYGIENE OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM 

Foster Standish Kellogg, M.D.. 

LECTURER ON PELViC HYGIENE. 

Walter B Lancaster, M.D.. 

LECTURER ON VISUAL HYGIENE. 

Andrew Roy MacAusland. M.D., 

LECTURER ON ORTHOPEDICS. 

William Russell MacAusland, M.D., 

LECTURER ON ORTHOPEDICS. 

William Emerson Preble, B.A., M.D., 

LECTURER ON INTERNAL MEDICINE. 

Harold Grant Tobey, M.D.. 

LECTURER IN OTO-LARYNGOLOGY 

Harvey Parker Towle, M.D.. 

LECTURER ON THE HYGIENE OF THE SKIN. 

I. Courses Prescribed for the Certificate of the Department 

(1) A two years' course especially designed for the training of teachers of 
hygiene and physical education and leading to the certificate of the Department 
of Hygiene and Physical Education is offered to graduates of approved col- 
leges. In order to be admitted to this course candidates must be without 
organic disease or serious functional disorder. A keen sense of rhythm is 
necessary, and also the ability to use the voice with ease and power. Previous 
courses in Chemistry, Physics, Psychology and Education are essential. If 
only two of these are offered for admission, opportunity will be given in the 
first year to take Chemistry 101 or Physics 101, or Psychology 101 and 
Education 201 (second semester).* 

Courses leading to the degree of M.A. may be completed while in residence 
for the certificate. Detailed information will be found in the Circular of the 
Department or the Graduate Circular. 

(2) A five years' course is offered leading to the B.A. degree and the 
certificate of the Department of Hygiene and Physical Education. This course 

*See undergraduate courses in Chemistry, Physics, Psychology, Education. 



Hygiene and Physical Education 87 

is open only to canilidates for the B.A. degree in residence at Wellesley College. 
In general, students in this course receive the B.A. degree at the end of the 
fourth year and complete in the fifth year the work required for the certificate. 
The following courses may count toward the Bachelor's degree: course 301, one 
and one-half hours; courses 302, 303, 321, 322, each three hours, (See pages 
93, 94 for Directions for Candidates for the B.A. Degree and for the Certificate 
of the Department.) 

Required Courses for First-Year Students 

101. Gymnastics. Marching— adaptation of modern military march- 
ing. Elementary to fairly advanced free-standing gymnastic exercises, 
with and without hand apparatus. Elementary exercises on gymnastic 
apparatus. 

Required of first-year students. Three hours a week in the jail and 
five in the mnter. Dr. Skarstrom, Miss Coleman. 

102. Team Games and Sports. Practice for skill, study of rules 
and coaching methods; fall season— baseball, basket-ball and field hockey; 
spring season— archery, baseball, basket-ball, rowing and tennis. Horse- 
back riding is elective and carries a special fee. 

Required of first-year students. Six hours a week in the jail, eight 
hours in the spring. Mr. Howe, Miss Coleman, 

Miss MacEwan, Miss Garrison, Miss Thompson. 

103. Personal Hygiene. A conservative exposition of the regulation 
of the environmental conditions of health, and of the guidance of adapta- 
tion to these conditions. 

Required of first-year students. One hour a week for the first semester. 

Mr. Howe. 

104. Dancing. Elementary rhythmic work and dramatic games for 
small children the first semester; folk and national dances the second 
semester. 

Required of first-year students. One hour a week for the first semester, 
two hours for the second semester. Miss MacEwan. 

105. Dancing. This course aims at spontaneous artistic expression 
of music through bodily movement. It includes fundamental exercises 
and their application, a vocabulary of steps based upon such natural 
activities, and a study of the form and mood of music in relation to the 
dance. 

Required of first-year students two hours a week for a year. 

Miss MacEwan. 

106. Symptomatology and Emergencies. First Aid methods and a 
brief statement of the nature, causes and symptoms of the more common 
diseases. 

Required of first-year students. One hour a week for the first semester. 

Dr. Raymond. 



88 Courses of Instruction 

107. Swimming. 

Required of first-year students. Twelve lessons in the second semester. 

Miss Thompson. 

203. Technique of Teaching Gymnastics. Lectures and quizzes on 
gymnastic terminology with a survey of gymnastic material, followed by 
preliminary practice teaching. Thorough drill on all technical devices 
of teaching. 

Required of first-year students. Three hours a week for a year. 

Dr. Skarstrom, Miss Coleman. 

208. Play, Playgrounds, and Athletics. Psychology of play; forms, 
uses and selection of play activities. Playground management and super- 
vision. Practice and discussion of the following activities: track and 
field athletics, mass games, group games, dramatic and mimetic play. 

Required of first-year students. Two hours a week for a year. 

Mr. Geer. 

301. Mammalian A^AToyi^. (Zoology 301 — See Department of 
Zoology and Physiology.) 

302. General Physiology. (Special Course for Hygiene Students, 
Zoology 302 — See Department of Zoology and Physiology.) 

303. Kinesiology. Lectures and recitations dealing with the anatomi- 
cal mechanism of movements: the roles of joint motion, muscular action, 
gravity, leverage, inertia, and internal resistance in the production and 
modification of gymnastic movements and their effects, as contrasted with 
"natural" movements. This course counts three hours toward the 
Bachelor's degree. 

Required of first-year students. Three hours a week for a year. 

Dr. Skarstrom. 

Required Courses for Second- Year Students 

201. Gymnastics. Intermediate and advanced marching, gymnastic 
free-standing exercises, and apparatus work. 

Required of second-year students. Two hours a week in the fall and 
four hours in the winter. Dr. Skarstrom. 

202. Team Games and Sports. A continuation of technique and 
method begun in course 102. 

Required of second-year students. Seven hours a week in the fall 
and spring. Mr. Howe, Miss Johnson, Miss Coleman, 

Miss MacEwan, Miss Garrison, Miss Thompson. 



Hygiene and Physical Education 89 

204. Dancing. Representative clog and character dances. 

Required of second-year students. One hour a week either semester. 

Miss MacEwan. 

205. Dancing. A continuation of course 105 with a study of adapta- 
tion for teaching purposes. 

Required of second-year students. Two hours a week for the second 
semester. Miss MacEwan. 

206. Practice in Teaching Dancing. Practice in teaching carried 
on in connection with further study of the aims and principles of adapta- 
tion. 

Required of second-year students. Two hours a week for the first 
semester. Miss MacEwan. 

207. Swimming. Each lesson consists of one-half hour lecture, one- 
half hour practice and one-half hour in teaching elementary swimming. 
(Standards adopted by the National Association of Directors of Girls' 
Camps.) 

Required of second-year students. Twelve lessons in the second 
semester. Miss Thompson. 

209. Applied Hygiene, Corrective Exercise, and Massage. First 
semester: Prepathological conditions. Second semester: Pathological 
conditions. Approximately 20 lectures in this course are given by ortho- 
pedic and medical specialists. Clinical demonstration of orthopedic ma- 
terial is given at the Carney Hospital. 

Required of second-year students. Two hours a week for a year. 

Miss Haagensen, Dr. MacAusland and other lecturers. 

211. Measurements and Graphic Records. Laboratory work in the 
use of anthropometric and graphic instruments (used in physical exam- 
ination), with practice in recording and filing; a presentation of the 
statistical methods of value in the solution of problems based upon 
anthropometric measurement. 

Required of second-year students. One hour a week for the second 
semester. Miss Coleman. 

212. History and Literature of Physical Education. A brief 
historical survey followed by a study of present problems and practices 
as revealed by recent literature. 

Required of second-year students. One hour a week for a year. 

Mr. Geer. 

213. Corrective Exercise and Massage. Preparation for and prac- 
tice under supervision in the use qf methods and exercises taught \n 



90 Courses of Instruction 

course 209. The work is carried on with public school pupils and with 
college students. 

Required of second-year students. Two hours a week from September 
to May. Miss FIaagensen, Miss Garrison. 

214. Practice Teaching. Students assist in the required work in 
the college classes and carry on under careful supervision regular physical 
education work in the public schools of Wellesley. 

Required of second-year students. Six to eight hours a week for the 
year. Dr. Skarstrom, Miss Coleman. 

215. Technique and Principles of Coaching Team Sports. A 
special study of the principal team sports including objectives, elementary 
and advanced technique and strategy, plans for dally work and for the 
season's organization, with special regard to the psychology of competi- 
tion and the health aspects of various sports. 

Required of second-year students. One hour a week for the first 
semester. 

Miss Coleman, Mr. Howe, Miss Thompson, Miss Waterman. 

304. Theory of Physical Education and Methods of Teaching. 
Study and discussion of the purposes, scope, and ideals of physical edu- 
cation; the character, selection, classification, arrangement, and progres- 
sion of gymnastic exercises, and the principles and technique of teaching. 

Required of second-year students. Three hours a week for a year. 

Dr. Skarstrom, Miss Cummings. 

321. Applied Physiology. The application of human physiology to 
the problems of hygiene and physical education. Reading and discus- 
sion based on laboratory findings which amount to a physiometric 
survey. The basic ideas throughout the course are the interaction of 
functions, especially in connection with the effects of exercise and the 
problems of fatigue, co-ordination, training and growth. Selected tests 
of fatigue and fitness are performed by the class on themselves, and when 
feasible on untrained subjects. This course counts three hours toward 
the Bachelor's or Master's degree. 

Required of second-year students. Course 302 or its equivalent is a 
prerequisite. Three hours a week for a year. Mr. Howe. 

Elective Courses 

108. Indoor Basket Ball. (Not given in 1924-25.) The technique 
and practice of indoor basket ball. 

Open to first and second-year students and to five-year students by 
arrangement . One hour a week for the first semester. Miss Coleman. 



Hygiene and Physical Education 91 

109. Gymnastic Apparatus Work. Review and additional practice 
of the apparatus work given in 101 and 201. 

Open to first and second-year students and to five-year students by 
arrangement. One hour a week, November to May. Dr. Skarstrom. 

216. Music in Relation to Dancing. This course includes ear- 
training for dance music, lectures on rhythms and time, and analyses 
of music forms and dance forms and their relationship to each other. 

Open to first and second-year students. One hour a week for the 
second semester. Miss Johnson. 

217. Problems of Organization and Administration. (Not offered 
in 1924-25.) Organization and management studied by field trips, discus- 
sion, and library investigation. Records, reports and budgets, construc- 
tion and upkeep of buildings and sport fields. 

Open to first and second-year students in the Department. One hour 
a week for the second semester. Miss Cummings. 

218. Problems in Corrective Work. A course planned for those 
wishing to prepare for remedial work in schools or hospitals. Hospital 
clinic work is provided. 

Open to second-year students. One or more hours a week for the 
second semester. Miss Haagensen, Dr. MacAusland. 

322. Health Problems of School and Community. The problems 
of growth, of health instruction and environmental hygiene In the solu- 
tion of which the teacher In physical education should be prepared to 
assist, advise or supervise. This course counts three hours toward the 
Master's degree. 

Open to students who have completed course 302 or 321. Three hours 
a week for a year. Mr. Howe, Miss Rice. 

323. Seminary in Hygiene and Physical Education. Reading, in- 
vestigation and reports on current problems In hygiene and physical 
education; conferences; presentation of one or more papers for discussion. 

Open to graduate students in the Department by permission. One or 
more semester hours. 

The Director and Members of the Department. 

II. Courses Open to all Undergraduates 

Two hours in Hygiene and Physical Education are prescribed for the de- 
gree. One hour of this requirement is met by course 120; the second hour is 
met by four periods of practical work, two periods per week in the freshman 
year and two in the sophomore year, usually by courses 121 and 122. 

Courses 124 and 123 may be required in place of 121 and 122; and course 
123 may be substituted for 122. See description of courses. Except as thus 
provided they do not count toward the degree. 

120. Personal Hygiene. The aim of this course is to present the 
principles of personal hygiene and public health and to develop their 



92 Courses of Instruction 

Intelligent application to the daily living of college students and mem- 
bers of families and communities. 

Required of freshmen. One hour a week for a year. 

Miss Cummings, Miss Pinkerton. 

121. Gymnastics and Outdoor Sports. Organized sports for six 
weeks in the fall and spring, designated 121 f. s. (fall, spring); gym- 
nastics in the winter, 121 w. (winter). The sports offered are archery, 
baseball, basket ball, field hockey, horse-back riding, golf, rowing, tennis, 
volley ball and selected track and field events. Students with individual 
health problems will substitute course 124 for 121 w. 

Required of freshmen. Two hours a week for a year, counting one-^ 
half hour toward the degree. 

Miss Coleman, Miss Waterman, Miss Johnson, Miss MacEwan, 
Miss Garrison, Miss Thompson, and Assistants. 

122. Gymnastics and Outdoor Sports. Advanced work In the 
activities enumerated under course 121. The outdoor work of this course 
is designated as 122 f. s. (fall, spring), and the Indoor work as 122 w. 
(winter). Students needing corrective or remedial work will substitute 
course 125 for 122 w. 

Required of sophomores who have completed course 121. Two hours 
a week for a year counting one-half hour toward the degree. 

Miss Coleman, Miss Waterman, Miss Johnson, Miss MacEwan, 
Miss Garrison, Miss Thompson, and Assistants. 

123. Gymnastics. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed courses 121 and 122 
or their equivalent, and by examination to sophomores who have had an 
equivalent of courses 121 and 122. Two hours a week from November 
to May. Dr. Skarstrom, Miss Johnson, and Assistants. 

124. Corrective Exercise and Applied Hygiene. 

Required in place of 121 w. in the case of all freshmen whose physical 
condition indicates the need of individualized work. Two hours a week 
from November to May. 

Miss Haagensen, Miss Garrison, and Assistants. 

125. Corrective Exercise and Applied Hygiene. 

Required in place of 122 w. in the case of all sophomores whose physical 
condition indicates the need of individualized work. Two hours a week 
from November to May. 

Mi§s Haagej^sen, Miss Garrison, and As3istants. 



Hygiene and Physical Education 93 

126. Organized Sports. Archery, baseball, basket ball, golf, field 
hockey, horse-back riding, rowing, tennis, volley ball and selected track 
events. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed courses 121 and 122, 
or their equivalent. Two hours a week in the jail and spring terms. Not 
to count toward the degree. 

Miss Johnson, Miss Coleman, Miss MacEwan, 
Miss Garrison, Miss Thompson, Miss Waterman 

AND Field Instructors. 

127. Dancing, This course aims at the spontaneous artistic expression 
of music through bodily movement. It includes progressive fundamental 
exercises for neuro-muscular control and the application of these in the 
expression of the content of music; a vocabulary of steps based upon 
such natural activities as walking, running, skipping, leaping, etc.; and 
a study of the form and mood of music in its relation to the dance. 

Open to students who have had no previous training. One hour a 
week from November to May. Not to count toward the degree. 

Miss MacEwan. 

128. Dancing. Continuation of 127. 

Open to students who have completed course 127 or an equivalent. One 
hour a week from November to May. Not to count toward the degree. 

Miss MacEwan. 

Directions to Undergraduates who are Candidates for the B.A. Degree and 

for the Certificate of the Department of Hygiene and 

Physical Education 

Five years are required to complete the work for both degree and 
certificate. The work of the degree may be completed in four years. 

A student may enter this five-year course at the beginning of her 
freshman, sophomore, or junior year. By the end of the sophomore year 
a student should have completed Hygiene and Physical Education 120, 
121, 122, Biblical History 101.2, Chemistry 101, and Physics 101, the 
prescribed courses in English Composition, Mathematics, Philosophy, 
Reading and Speaking, or should offer satisfactory equivalents. A full 
major in Zoology is an advantage. Courses 127, 128 in Hygiene and Phys- 
ical Education are advised. The work for the last three years for a 
student who has had no previous work in Zoology is as follows: 

Junior Year: Courses 101, 102, lOS, 106* and 301. Course 301 counts 
toward the B.A. degree and a major In Zoology. 

Senior Year: Courses 104, 107, 123, 203, 208, 302 and 303. Courses 
302 and 303 count toward the B.A. degree and course 302 toward a 
major in Zoology. Course 321 must generally be postponed to the fifth 

*Students are advised to postpone course 106 until the senior year if 
possible. 



94 Courses of Instruction 

year, but, If taken by arrangement, will count three hours toward the 
B.A. degree. 

Education 201 is required and should ordinarily be taken in the junior 
year. Courses in French, German, Economics, Psychology and Bacteriology 
are advised. 

Fifth Year: Courses 201, 202, 204, 205, 206, 207, 209, 211, 212, 213, 
214, 215, 304, and if not already completed, 321. Course 322 may be 
elected and counts three hours for the M.A. degree; course 321 may also 
count toward the M.A. degree. 

Students are also referred to the Circular of the Department of 
Hygiene and Physical Education. 



ITALIAN 

Professor : Margarett Hastings Jackson. (Chairman.) 
Assistant : Adeue Vacchelli, B.A. 

101$. Elementary Course. Grammar, with written and oral exer- 
cises; reading and sight translation; conversation. 

Open to all undergraduates. Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss Vacchelli. 

201. Intermediate Course. Grammar, prose composition; reading 
and translation at sight; in the first semester from modern authors; in 
the second semester from the classic authors. 

Open to students who have completed course 101 or equivalent. Three 
hours a week for a year. Miss Vacchelu. 

202*. Dante and the Early Italian Renaissance. English 
Course. (Not offered in 1924-25.) Dante's Divine Comedy (in Eng- 
lish) and the conditions of the age which produced it; the Early Italian 
Renaissance as expressed in the works of Petrarch and Boccaccio. A 
knowledge of Italian is not required. 

Open to juniors and seniors. Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss Jackson. 

Note. — The Dante Society offers an annual prize of one hundred dol- 
lars for the best essay on a subject drawn from the life or works of 
Dante. The competition is open to students or graduates of not more 
than three years' standing from colleges or universities in the United 
States. For subjects and conditions consult page 210 of the Harvard 
University Catalogue, 1923-24. 

t Italian 101 may not be counted toward the B.A. degree, if taken after 
the junior year. 

*It will be the privilege of students in courses 202, 303, 304, and 305 to 
have access to the manuscripts and early — often contemporary — editions of 
Italian authors contained in the Frances Pearsons Plympton Collection. 



Italian 95 

301. History of Italian Literature in the Thirteenth and Four- 
teenth Centuries. Emphasis on Dante. (Not offered in 1924-25.) 
Selections from the Vita Nuova and the Divina Commedia of Dante, 
the Sonnets of Petrarch and the Tales of Boccaccio will be read in the 
original. 

Open on consultation with the instructor to juniors and seniors who 
have a reading knowledge of Italian. Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss Jackson. 

302. History of Italian Literature in the Nineteenth Century. 
(Not given in 1924-25.) 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed courses 101 and 201 
or equivalents. Three hours a week for a year. Miss Jackson. 

303*. Italian Prose Writers of the Fifteenth and Early Six- 
teenth Centuries. Selections from the works of Macchiavelli, Casti- 
glione, Savonarola and other writers of the period will be read in the 
original. 

Open on consultation with the instructor to juniors and seniors who 
have a reading knowledge of Italian. Three hours a week for the first 
semester. Miss Jackson. 

304*. Italian Poets of the Fifteenth and Early Sixteenth 
Centuries. Selections from Poliziano, Lorenzo de' Medici, Boiardo, 
Ariosto, Michael Angelo, Vittoria Colonna will be read in the original. 
While courses 303 and 304 are continuous, one being the complement 
of the other, they may be elected separately. 

Open on consultation with the instructor to juniors and seniors who 
have a reading knowledge of Italian. Three hours a week for the second 
semester. Miss Jackson. 

305*. Literature of the Italian Renaissance. (Not given in 
1924-25.) It is not the intention of the instructor to cover the entire 
period of the Renaissance but to treat of certain aspects only, the work to 
adjust itself to the needs of the individual student. Under the super- 
vision of the instructor the student will choose some author, or phase, or 
problem of Italian literature for special study, reporting thereon weekly. 

Open on consultation with the instructor to graduate students who have 
a reading knowledge of Italian. Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss Jackson. 

•It will be the privilege of students in courses 202, 303, 304, and 305 to 
have access to the manuscripts and early — often contemporary — editions of 
Italian authors contained in the Frances Pearsons Plimpton Collection. 



96 Courses of Instruction 



LATIN 

PROFESSORS: ADELINE BELUE HAWES, M.A. (CHAIRMAN.) 

Alice Walton, Ph.D. 
Associate Professors: Caroline Rebecca Fletcher, M.A. 

Anna Bertha Miller,* Ph.D. 
Instructor : Anna Elisabeth Klein, M.A. 

101. Introduction to Latin Literatxtre. A brief survey of the 
literature illustrated by short passages from representative authors in 
connection with a more detailed study of certain masterpieces in prose 
and verse. First semester, Studies in Prose, the Essay and the Letter. 
Cicero's Essays on Old Age and Friendship and selections from his 
correspondence with friends, followed by a few letters of other Latin 
authors. Second semester. Studies in Poetry, Terence, The Andria; 
Horace, the Epodes; Orid, Metamorphoses. 

Open to freshmen who have offered four units of Latin for admission, 
and to sophomores, juniors, and seniors zvho have had no Latin in 
college. Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss Walton, Miss Fletcher, Miss Klein. 

102. Contributions of Latin Literature to Modern Life and 
Thought. (Not offered in 1924-25.) The study of passages in Latin 
authors embodying certain fundamental ideas which are a part of the 
classical heritage of modern life. The reading and class discussion will 
center about topics suggested in such current terms as imperial destiny, 
citizenship, nationalism, the State Church, humanism, etc. The readings 
will be selected from Catullus, Cicero, Horace, Livy, Ovid, Vergil, and 
other authors. 

Open to freshmen who have offered four units of Latin for admission, 
and to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have had no Latin in col- 
lege. Three hours a week for a year. Miss Miller. 

201. Horace. The Odes are studied, with selections from the Epistles. 
Open to students who have completed course 101 or 102. Three hours 

a week for the first semester. Miss Walton. 

202. Vergil. Selections from the Bucolics, Georgics, and j^neid, 

rii-xiL 

open to students who have completed course 101 or 102. Three hours 
a week for the first semester. Miss Hawes. 

203. Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid. (Not offered in 1924-25.) 
Open to students who have completed course 101 or 102. Three hours 

a week for the first semester. Miss Fletcher. 

'Absent on leave. 



Latin 97 

204. Studies in Tacitus and Pliny. Tacitus, Germania and Jgricola, 
with selections from the other works. PUny's Letters. The work in 
Pliny includes careful study of certain letters and the rapid reading of 
many others. 

Open to students who have completed a semester course of grade II. 
Three hours a week for the second semester. Miss Walton. 

205. Cicero's Philosophical Works. Selections from the Tusculan 
Disputations, the De Officiis and other works. 

Open to students who have completed a semester course of grade II. 
Three hours a week for the second semester. Miss Hawes. 

206. Latin Prose Composition. Intermediate Course. 

Open to students who have completed course 101 or 102. One hour a 
week for a year. Miss Fletcher. 

207. Sight Reading in Prose and Verse. (Not offered in 1924-25.) 

Open to students who are taking a full course of grade II. One hour 
a week for a year. A second appointment with the instructor is substi- 
tuted for preparation. Miss Miller. 

208. Roman Life and Customs. (Not offered in 1924-25.) Lectures, 
illustrated by photographs and lantern sHdes, on subjects connected with 
the daily life and surroundings of the Romans, such as family life, 
dress, education, buildings, roads, travel, social functions, amusements, 
religious customs, etc. The required reading will be mainly in English. 

Open to juniors and seniors without prerequisite, and to sophomores 
who have completed course 101 or 102. One hour a week for a year. 

Miss Miller. 

301. Comedy. Plautus and Terence. This course includes the care- 
ful study of two or more plays followed by the rapid reading of others. 

Open to students who have completed two full courses. Three hours a 
week for the first semester. Miss Hawes. 

302. Satire. Horace and Juvenal. This course includes the read- 
ing of selected satires of Horace and Juvenal, with study of other Roman 
satirists by lectures and special topics. Sight reading In Martial. 

Open to students who have completed two full courses. Three hours a 
week for the second semester. Miss Hawes. 

303. Latin Epigraphy. (Not offered In 1924-25.) Selected Inscrip- 
tions will be studied both for their content as sources of Roman public 
and private life, and their form. Sandys' Latin Inscriptions and facsimiles 
will be used. 

Open to students who have completed two full courses. Three hours a 
week for the first semester. Miss Walton. 



98 Courses of Instruction 

304. Topography of Roman Sites. (Not offered in 1924-2S.) Archi- 
tectural History and Topography of Ancient Rome and of typical munic- 
ipal and provincial towns. 

Open to students who have completed two full courses. Three hours a 
week for the second semester. Miss Walton. 

305. Livy: History of Early Rome. Study of the sources of the 
early history of the Roman Republic. Lectures and collateral reading. 

Open to students who have completed two full courses. Three hours a 
a week for the first semester. Miss Fletcher. 

306. Studies in Roman Religion. The early religious institutions 
of the Romans will be studied from Ovid's Fastij Cicero's De Natura 
Deorum, and other sources. 

Open to students who have completed two full courses. Three hours a 
a week for the second semester. Miss Fletcher. 

307. Latin Literature of the Early Christian Period. (Not 
offered in 1924-25.) Readings from the Early Christian Apologists and 
Fathers illustrating the contact of Christian ideals with Pagan thought 
and civilization. Latin Hymns. This course may count as an elective 
in the Department of Biblical History. 

Open to students who have completed two full courses. Three hours a 
week for the second semester. Miss Miller. 

308. Latin Prose Composition. (Not given in 1924-25.) 

Open at the discretion of the instructor to students who have com- 
pleted course 206. One hour a week for a year. Miss Fletcher. 

309$. Literature of the Roi^l^n Empire. The aim of this course 
is to secure an acquaintance with many representative authors of the 
Roman Empire, and to show the interest and the value of the "Silver 
Latinity" and the writers of the later Imperial Period. The readings, 
which include both poetry and prose, and vary somewhat from year 
to year, include selections from Velleius Paterculus, Seneca, Petronlus, 
Quintilian, Tacitus, Martial, Apulelus, Claudlan, Boethius, and other 
authors. The course includes lectures and discussions on various aspects 
of society in the time of the Empire. Rapid reading without translation 
is one of the features of this course. 

Open to students who have completed three full courses. Three hours 
a week for a year. Miss Hawes. 

310$. Survey of Latin Poetry. (Not offered in 1924-25.) Part I, 
Poetry of the Republic. Part H, Poetry of the Empire. In Part I, some 

JCourses 309 and 310 are not given in the same year. 



Mathematics 99 

study is given to the beginnings of Latin poetry and the earlier poets, 
but the main emphasis is placed upon the poets of the Ciceronian Age, 
Catullus and Lucretius. In Part II, the aim is to secure an acquaintance 
with representative poets of different periods, and to show the interest 
and the value of the later Latin poetry. Rapid reading without trans- 
lation is one of the features of this course. 

Open to students who have completed three full courses. Three hours 
a week for a year. Miss Hawes. 

321. Outline History of Latin Literature. The design of this 
course is to enable a graduate student to study the authors and periods 
and forms of literature which were not included in her undergraduate 
work, and thus to complete the work done in individual courses by a 
comprehensive view of Latin literature as a whole and its place in 
world literature. The course demands much independent work and Is 
intended to meet individual needs. 

Primarily for graduates. Open to qualified seniors by permission of 
the department. Miss Hawes. 

MATHEMATICS 

Professors « Helen Abbot MERRruu, Ph.D. (Chairman.) 
RoxANA Hayward Vivian, Ph.D. 
Clara Eliza Smith, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor : Mabel Minerva Young, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professors : Lennie Phoebe Copeland, Ph.D. 

Mary Curtis Graustein, Ph.D. 
Instructors i Ruby Willis. B.A. 

Ethel Louise Anderton, M.A. 

lOL Trigonometry. Trigonometric equations and transformations, 
including the use of inverse functions; radian measure; graphs of the 
trigonometric functions; solution of triangles. 

Required of freshmen. Three hours a week for the first semester. 

Miss Merrill, Miss Vivian, Miss Smith, Miss Young, 
Miss Copeland, Mrs. Graustein, Miss Willis, Miss Anderton. 

102. Higher Algebra. In addition to some of the ordinary topics 
of college algebra, this course includes differentiation and integration of 
algebraic functions, with applications to concrete problems of maxima 
and minima and to the determination of simple areas. 

Required of freshmen who do not take course 103. Three hours a 
week for the second semester. 

Miss Merrill, Miss Vivian, Miss Smith, Miss Young, 
Miss Copeland, Mrs. Graustein, Miss Willis, Miss Anderton. 

103t. The Elements of Analytic Geometry. A brief course, 
covering the usual topics, and planned to introduce students as early as 

tCourse 103 will count one hour only toward the B.A. degree for students 
who offer course 102 also. 



100 Courses of Instruction 

possible to advanced courses in mathematics. The necessary topics in 
higher algebra will be treated. 

Of en to approved freshmen as an alternative to course 102. Three 
hours a week for the second semester. 

Miss Merrill, Miss Smith, Miss Young. 

201. Analytic Geometry and Calculus. The more elementary- 
parts of Analytic Geometry and Calculus. 

Ope7i to students who have completed courses 101 and 102, and by 
special permission to freshmen who have had a course in Trigonometry 
equivalent to that outlined by the College Entrance Examination Board. 
Three hours a week for a year. Miss Smith, 

202. Differential and Integral Calculus. The applications in- 
clude a course in curve tracing. 

Open to students who have completed courses 101 and 103. Three 
hours a week for a year. Miss Vivian, Miss Copeland. 

203. History of Elementary Mathematics. (Not given in 1924- 
25.) The evolution of the fundamental concepts of mathematics. Great 
mathematicians and their chief contributions to elementary mathematics. 
A brief survey of modern developments in mathematics and its litera- 
ture. A standard text is used, supplemented by lectures and short reports 
chiefly based upon rare old books in the mathematical library. 

Open to students who have completed or are taking course 201 or 202. 
Three hours a week for the second semester. Miss Copeland. 

204. Introduction to the Theory of Statistics. (Not given in 
1924-25.) Lectures with supplementary reading on some of the mathe- 
matical principles and methods used in statistical work. Each student 
will present one or more papers based upon data drawn from biology, 
economics, education, insurance, psychology, vital and population statis- 
tics, or other sources. 

Open to students who have completed course 101 and either course 
102 or 103. One hour a week for a year. Miss Vivian. 

205. Problem Work in Statistics. (Not offered in 1924-25.) The 
class will meet two periods a week for problem work and exercises in 
the collection and arrangement of material, and certain methods will be 
presented in addition to those in course 204. 

Open to students who have completed course 101 and either course 
102 or 103. One hour a week for a year. Miss Vivian. 

Note, — Course 204 is primarily for theory and for those students who 
wish to use critically the statistics of others. Course 205 is primarily for 



Mathematics 101 

problem work and for those students who wish practice In collecting and 
arranging statistical material. Students may elect course 204 without 
course 205, but not course 205 without course 204. 

206. Descriptive Geometry. (Not given In 1924-25.) The theory 
and practice of the representation of geometric figures. The use of two 
or more planes of projection In representing lines, surfaces, and solids. 
Shades and shadows. One lecture a week with one laboratory period. 

Open to students who are taking a three-hour elective course in Mathe- 
matics, and by special permission to a limited number who have com- 
pleted course 103. One hour a week for a year. Miss Merrill. 

301. Calculus and its Applications. The applications include a 
study of curves and space forms, and simple problems In mechanics and 
differential equations. 

Open to students who have completed course 201. Three hours a week 
for a year. Mrs. Graustein. 

302. Higher Analysis. Differentiability and integrability of func- 
tions, continuity, convergency of series, representation of functions by 
power series, theory of Integration, Infinite Integrals, elliptic integrals, 
Fourier series, and other allied subjects. 

Open to students who have completed course 202 or 301. Three hours 
a week for a year. Miss Merrill. 

303*. Differential Equations. An Introductory course In ordinary 
and partial differential equations. 

Open to students who have completed course 202 or 301. Three hours 
a week for the first semester. Miss Copeland. 

304. Theory of Equations, with Determinants. The work Is based 
on Burnside and Panton's Theory of Equations. 

Open to students zvho have completed course 202 or who have com- 
pleted or are takitig course 301. Three hours a week for the second 
semester. Miss Copeland. 

305. Solid Analytic Geometry. (Not offered in 1924-25.) The 
straight line; the plane; surfaces of the second order. Brief study of 
surfaces in general. 

Open to students who have completed course 202 or who have com- 
pleted or are taking course 301. Three hours a week for the second 
semester. 

*Physics 305, if preceded by Mathematics 303, may be counted toward major 
in Mathematics. 



102 Courses of Instruction 

306. Modern Synthetic Geometry. Metrical and projective prop- 
erties of plane and sheaf forms of the first and second orders; the an- 
harmonic ratio; harmonic forms; the method of inversion; involution; 
coUineation; the law of duality; theory of poles and polars; reciproca- 
tion; space forms and surfaces of the second order. Given by lectures 
and references, with constant practice in the solution of geometrical 
problems. 

Open to students who have completed course 202 or who have com- 
pleted or are taking course 301. Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss Young. 

307. Higher Plane Curves. (Not given in 1924-25.) Systems of 
co-ordinates; general theory of algebraic curves; singularities; selected 
curves of different orders; theory of correspondence, transformation of 
curves. A lecture course, time being allowed for students to present 
papers to the class dealing with phases of the subject not covered by the 
lectures. 

Open to students who have completed course 202 or 301. Three hours 
a week for a year. Miss Vivian. 

308. Functions of a Complex Variable. Elementary treatment of 
analytic functions. Infinite series and products, with applications to 
beta, gamma, and elliptic functions. 

Open to students who have completed course 202 or 301. Three hours 
a week for a year. Miss Smith. 



MUSIC 

Professors : Hamilton Crawford Macdougalu, Mus.D. 
Clarence Grant Hamilton, M.A. 
Assistant Professor : Alfred Henry Meyer, Mus. B., B.A. 
Instructors : Emily Josephine Hurd. 
Albert Thomas Foster. 
Blanche Francis Brocklebank. 
Carl Webster. 
Edith Bullard. 
Assistants : Annie Bigelow Stowe, B.A. 
Naoma Rebecca Thomas, B.A. 

The Wellesley College Choir of forty members, founded in 1900, fur- 
nishes the music for the Sunday services in the Memorial Chapel. Any 
student with a good natural voice is eligible for membership; trials to 
fill vacancies are held at the opening of each College year. 

The college Symphony Orchestra, consisting of about thirty student 
and faculty members, was founded in 1906. It offers advantages of com- 
petent instruction in ensemble playing under a professional conductor. 
It gives one or two concerts a year with a programme of classical music. 



Music 103 

Any members of the College who have sufficient technique are admitted 
to membership. 

A limited number of tickets for reserved seats at the concerts of the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra in Symphony Hall, Boston, are free to stu- 
dents in the department who are able to use them profitably. 



I. Musical Theory 

The courses in theory and history are open to all students without 
regard to previous musical knowledge, and count toward the B.A. degree. 
The history and theory courses are subject to no separate tuition fee. 
Courses 102, 206, 305, 306, 307, and 308 are designed especially for those 
students desiring to gain an appreciative knowledge of musical literature. 

101. Elementary Harmony. This course is designed for freshmen 
who enter college with the intention of specializing in music. It may be 
followed by course 201, but not by course 102. This course covers musi- 
cal notation, the formation of triads and chords of the seventh, the 
invention of melodies and their harmonization, the simpler kinds of non- 
harmonic tones, elementary form, and ear training. Carefully kept note- 
books are a part of the work. 

Ope7i only to freshmen who are taking practical music. No prere- 
quisites. Two hours a week for a year. Mr. Hamilton. 

102. Introductory Harmony. This course covers the ground neces- 
sary for admission to course 201 or 305, and also "offers a substantial 
foundation for subsequent work in practical or theoretical music. It in- 
cludes the material of the ordinary elementary harmony course and In 
addition emphasizes ear training and harmonic analysis. This course Is 
not open to students who have taken course 101. 

Open to sophomores, juniors, seniors, and advanced freshmen (five-year 
music course). No prerequisites. Three hours a week for a year. 

Mr. Meyer. 

103. Interpretation. This course is a training in the principles of 
interpretation, developed through the performance in class of music 
studied with the private teacher and by listening to and analyzing com- 
positions performed by others. The course concerns itself with the rec- 
ognition of the simple cadences, harmonic figuration as applied to the 
accompaniment, the broader rhythmical distinctions, the relations of 
melody and accompaniment, the school of the composer, biographical 
data, and the simpler elements of form. 

Note. — Students wishing to elect the course should apply directly 
to the head of the department. 



104 Courses of Instruction 

Students may elect practical music without electing the course In 
Interpretation; but no one may elect the course In Interpretation without 
at the same time electing practical music. 

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who are at the same time 
taking lessons in practical music in the department and who have ac- 
quired a satisfactory degree of skill. One hour a week for a year. 

Mr. Macdougall, Mr. Hamilton. 

201. Advanced Harmony. This course covers in extenso the various 
classes of non-harmonic tones, chords of the ninth modulation, elemen- 
tary orchestration, writing for the piano, organ, and for voices. The 
course aims to give facility in elementary composition. 

Open to students who have completed course 101 or 102 or the equiva- 
lent. Three hours a week for a year. Mr. Macdougall. 

202. Applied Harmony. (Not offered in 1924-25.) This course 
aims to realize synthetically at the pianoforte the principles taught in 
course 201, following what may be termed a laboratory method. 

Note. — Instruction will be given in small classes of not less than 
three students. The course is in no sense a substitute for pianoforte 
lessons. Students must satisfy the head of the department that they 
have a pianoforte technique adequate for the work; In general, the ability 
to play the easier Mendelssohn Songs without Words, and to read hymn 
tunes accurately at sight will be sufficient. 

Open to those students only who are at the same time taking course 
201. Two hours a week for a year. Mr. Hamilton. 

204. Interpretation. (Not given in 1924-25.) This course Is a 
continuation of course 103, The subject-matter of the course Is the 
thematic and polyphonic melody, the larger forms, harmony In Its 
aesthetic bearings, the aesthetic effects of the more complicated rhythms, 
comparative criticism and the various schools of composition. See note 
to course 103. 

Open to students who have completed course 103 and who are at the 
same time taking lessons in practical music in the department and have 
acquired a satisfactory degree of skill, also by special permission to 
seniors. One hour a week for a year. 

Mr. Macdougall, Mr. Hamilton. 

206. History of Music Lectures on the history of music of all 
nations, with assigned readings and frequent musical illustrations, from 
which the student Is taught to compile analytical programs and critiques. 
The course is non-technical and no previous knowledge of music Is re- 



Music 105 

quired. It is not open to students who have taken or are taking course 
305. 

Open to juniors and seniors, and to sophomores who have had one 
course in the department. Three hours a week for a year. 

Mr. Hamilton. 

301. Counterpoint. Counterpoint in two, three, and four voices; 
double counterpoint; analysis; the distinction between strict (modal) 
and free counterpoint; the rules for the latter deduced from contem- 
poraneous practice; fugue for two and three voices. 

Open to students who have completed course 201. Three hours a week 
for the first semester. Mr. Meyer. 

302. Musical Form. This course aims to cover the various imitative 
forms, the suite and sonata forms, the large forms of vocal and orchestral 
music. Students have the opportunity of doing practical work in com- 
position (song form, sonata movments, etc.). 

Open to students who have completed course 301. Three hours a week 
for the second semester. Mr. Meyer. 

303. Applied Counterpoint. (Not offered in 1924-25.) This course 
aims to realize synthetically at the pianoforte the laws of simple and 
double counterpoint by the constant playing and analysis of the best 
examples from the masters. See note to course 202. 

Open to those students only who are at the same time taking course 

301. Two hours a week for the first semester. 

304. Applied Form. (Not offered in 1924-25.) This course aims to 
play and to analyze a great number of specimens of the various forms, 
with careful analysis and classification. See note to course 202. 

Open to those students only who are at the same time taking course 

302. Two hours a week for the second semester. 

305. The Development of the Art of Music. (Not offered in 
1924-25.) A course in the appreciation of music designed to develop 
musical perception and the ability to listen intelligently to the best 
music. It includes the evolution of rhythm, harmony, and melody, and 
their powers and offices in musical expression; the principal musical 
forms analytically considered; studies of the principal composers, their 
lives, their strongest works, their relation to the progress of musical art. 
Some great work will be selected for study during the year. This course 
is not open to students who have taken or are taking course 206. 

Open to students who have completed course 101 or 102 and course 
201. Three hours a week for a year. Mr. Macdougall. 

306. Beethoven and Wagner. An intensive course devoted to the 
analyses of selected pianoforte sonatas, chamber music, the symphonies 



106 Courses of Instruction 

of Beethoven, "Fidelio," and the operas of Wagner. The aim of the 
course will be to give an intimate knowledge of the two composers* 
works and to estimate their place in musical history. 

Open to students who have completed course 201 or its equivalent. 
Three hours a week for a year. Mr. Macdougall. 

307. Schubert and Schumann. (Not offered in 1924-25.) An illus- 
trated lecture course, intensive in character, devoted to the study of the 
principal works of the composers named. The romantic movement in 
music, the development of the German Song, the poetical and lyric piano 
piece and the birth of musical criticism are among the principal topics 
treated. The work of the class will be based mainly upon assigned 
readings and critical papers. 

Open to students who have completed course 201 or its equivalent. 
Three hours a week for the first semester. Mr. Hamilton. 

308. Mendelssohn and Chopin. (Not offered in 1924-25.) An illus- 
trated lecture course, intensive in character, devoted to the study of 
the principal works of the composers named. The beginnings of mod- 
ernism, the culmination of sacred music in the oratorio, the age of the 
virtuoso, the development of instruments and individual and emotional 
treatment in music are the principal topics studied. The work of the 
class will be based mainly upon assigned readings and critical papers. 

Open to students who have completed course 201 or its equivalent. 
Three hours a week for the second semester. Mr. Hamilton. 

309. Great Piano Composers, from the Elizabethan Era to the 
Present Time. A study of special traits of the music that relates to the 
epoch in which they lived, and their contribution to general musical 
progress. The work of the course will include the critical analysis of 
typical works and the writing of exercises in illustration of various styles. 
Some ability to play the piano is necessary. 

Open to students who have completed course 201 or its equivalent. 
Three hours a week for a year. Mr. Hamilton. 

310. Free Composition. (Not given in 1924-25.) 

Open by permission to students who have completed courses 301 and 
302. Three hours a week for a year. Mr. Macdougall. 

311. Applied History. (Not offered in 1924-25.) This course aims 
to realize synthetically at the pianoforte the development of music from 
the organum of Hucbald to the Wagner opera. Specimens of the music 
of various schools and periods will be collected, played, and analyzed. 
See note to course 202. 

Open to those students only who are at the same time taking course 
305. Two hours a week for a year. Mr. Macdougall. 



Music 107 

312. Critical Studies in Musical History. (Not offered in 1924- 
25.) The course attempts to give training in musical investigation. 
To each student will be assigned some special problem in musical 
history, musical criticism, musical form, or the like, on which she reports 
progress from week to week in the seminar. 

Open to graduates and to approved seniors who have taken one of 
the following sequences of courses, or their equivalent: 101, 201; 101, 
203; 102, 201; 102, 203. Three hours a week for a year. 

Mr. Macdougall. 



II. Practical Music (Instrumental and Vocal Lessons) 

Attention is called to the fact that a student need not necessarily spend 
five years in college in order to carry on practical music at the same time 
with the academic course. See (a) following. 

It is believed that students having a command of pianoforte or organ 
technique will be able to profit by the theoretical instruction given in the 
department to a fuller degree than those without such a technique. To 
encourage students to acquire a technique, as well as to furnish authori- 
tative instruction, the department undertakes to give lessons in piano- 
forte, organ, violin, and violoncello playing, and in singing. Atten- 
tion is called to the fact that students who elect Musical Theory 
103 and 204, are thereby obtaining two hours' credit toward the B.A. 
degree in connection with work done in practical music. It is offered 
to all students, whether candidates for degrees or not, as stated below: — 

(a) Candidates for the B.A. degree who propose to spend but four 
years in college may take practical music, provided that they obtain each 
year the permission of the Dean of the College as well as of the Pro- 
fessor of Music; they must also take a full course in Musical Theory, 
unless they have completed two two-hour or three-hour courses in the 
subject. 

(b) Candidates for the B.A. degree who are zoilling to devote jive years 
to the college course will be permitted to take practical music each year 
of the course, governed by the restriction laid down in (a). 

(c) Candidates for the B.A. degree who wish also the Certificate of the 
Department of Music should plan to devote five years to the college 
course. Such students are required to take practical music, two lessons 
a week, throughout the five years. They must complete, satisfactorily 
to the department, a course in the literature of the instrument chosen 
or of the voice; they must apply for the certificate at least three years 
in advance. 

(d) Students not candidates for the B.A. degree who desire to special- 
ize in music must meet the requirements prescribed for admission to the 



108 Courses of Instruction 

freshman class, and must in addition pass an entrance examination in 
Harmony. Special students must take both Musical Theory and vocal 
or instrumental lessons, two a week, with not less than twelve hours 
of weekly practice. They must also take from six to nine hours per 
week of academic work, including Musical Theory, as may be decided 
in consultation with the Dean of the College. 

(e) Students not candidates for the B.A. degree who wish the Certifi- 
cate of the Department of Music must comply with the conditions laid 
down in (d); moreover, the academic work taken must include modern 
languages. Such students must apply for the certificate on entering the 
department, and must have already acquired the fundamental technique 
of the instrument chosen or of the voice. The time occupied in study 
for the certificate depends upon the talent, upon the proficiency of the 
student at entrance, and upon her subsequent diligence; but in general 
four years at least are necessary. The various courses are so arranged 
that the pupil on completion will have an acquaintance with the best 
musical literature. 

(f) Graduates of Wellesley College or of other institutions may make 
special arrangement for instrumental or vocal lessons. 

(g) Permission to practice in Music Hall cannot be given to students 
not regularly registered in the department. 

(h) Students whose progress Is not satisfactory may be required to 
discontinue their lessons. 



PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY 

PROFESSORS: MARY WHITON CaLKINS, M.A., LiTT.D., LL.D. 

(Chairman.) 
Eleanor Acheson McCulloch Gamble, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor: Thomas Hayes Procter. Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor : Michael Jacob Zigler, Ph.D. 
Instructor: Marjorie Cornelia Day, M.A. 
Special Lecturer : William Pepperell Montague, Ph.D. 
Reader in Philosophy : Grace Allerton Andrews, M.A. 
Graduate Assistants : Inez Teress Cohen, B.A. 

Anna Mathiesen, B.A. 
Helen hood Taplin.' 

The requirement in philosophy for a degree is met by course 101 (first 
semester) followed in the same year by course 102 (second semester). 

L Logic 

208. Logic. Training in argument and in logical criticism. Work 
expressly designed to meet the practical needs of the student. The 
course deals not only with the principles of deductive logic, but also 

'Appointed for second semester only. 



Philosophy and Psychology 109 

with elementary questions of observation and testimony, and of scien- 
tific, statistical, and legal evidence. Text-book: Sellars, Essentials of 
Logic. 

Open to students who have completed course 101. Three hours a week 
for the second semester. Miss Gamble. 

II. Psychology 

For description of the Psychology Laboratory, see page 139. 

101. Introductory Course in Psychology. This course aims to 
secure to students an acquaintance with primary mental facts, to give 
them a definite notion of the topics treated and of the^ experimental 
methods employed in psychology, to provide a psychological basis for 
the study of philosophy, of sociology, and of education, and to fit them 
for more advanced psychological work. The course is conducted mainly 
by lectures, with weekly conference appointments. Texts: Gamble, Out- 
line Studies in Psychology; Calkins, A First Book in Psychology; 
Titchener, J Text-book of Psychology. 

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Three hours a week for the 
first semester. Lecture Divisions A and B, Miss Gamble; 

Division C, Mr. Zigler. 

Conferences, Miss Gamble, Miss Calkins, 

Mr. Zigler, Mr. Procter, Miss Day, Miss Mathiesen. 

209. Experimental Psychology, Laboratory Course. Every student 
is expected to perform one or two typical experiments breach of the mam 
fields of psychological investigation. The accompanying lectures will 
briefly relate these experiments in their historical setting. This course is 
designed to train the student in psychological method. 

Open to students who have completed course 101. Three hours a week 
for the first semester. Mr. Zigler. 

210. Experimental Problems in PsYtnoLOGY. This course consists 
of investigation of special problems by individual students. In 1924-25 
the problems may be chosen from among the following: visual, auditory, 
and tactual sensation, smell classification, association, memorizing, im- 
agery. The methods employed are wider than the problems and are 
adapted to training students in the fundamental demands of research. 

Open to students who have completed course 209. Three hours a week 
for the second semester. Miss Gamble, Mr. Zigler. 

303. Second Course in Experimental Problems in Psychology. In- 
vestigation of special problems. The work on any one of these problems 
may, at the discretion of the department, be preceded by some weeks 
of additional training in laboratory technique. In 1924-25 the subjects 



110 Courses of Instruction 

studied are: The relation of the memory span to facility in memorizing; 
associative recall under distraction; the possibility of inattentive memoriz- 
ing; the nature of the double image; an inversion of the size-weight 
illusion. 

Open to students who have completed course 210. Three hours a week 
for a year. Miss Gamble, Mr. Zigler. 

207. Genetic Psychology. Instinctive responses, formation of habits, 
development of mental functions In the child from birth to maturity. 
Text-book, Waddle, Introduction to Child Psychology; supplementary 
references to Kirkpatrick, The Individual in the Making, Norsworthy and 
Whitley, Psychology of Childhood, G. S. Hall, Adolescence. 

Open to juniors, and by permission to sophomores, who have completed 
course 101. Three hours a week for the second semester. 

Mr. Zigler. 

309. Social Applied and Abnormal Psychology. The course consists 
of three parts: A brief study of Social Psychology with special reference 
to social suggestibility and social initiative; Differential and Applied 
Psychology with special attention to mental tests and to the contribu- 
tions of psychology to commercial and industrial efficiency; and Abnormal 
Psychology, including the topics of dreams, psycho-therapy, mental defi- 
ciency, mental derangement, and delinquency In its psychological aspects. 
Among the books referred to are McDougall, The Group Mind; Maclver, 
Community; Martin, The Behavior of Crowds; Terman, Measurement 
of Intelligence; Link, Employment Psychology; Adams, Advertising and 
Its Mental Laws; Tredgold, Mental Deficiency; Rosanoff, Manual of 
Psychiatry; Healy, The Individual Delinquent. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed course 101 and who 
have taken or are taking, at least two semester courses chosen from the 
following: Courses 209, 210, and 207 in Psychology; course 205 in Phil- 
osophy; course 201 in Education; courses 202, 208, and 312 in Sociology; 
course 307 in Economics and course 305 in Zoology. Three hours a week 
for a year. Miss Gamble. 

For lectures in Social Psychology: Miss Calkins. 

324. Graduate Seminary. Types of Psychological Theory. In 
1924-1925 the special subject of study is the psychology of instincts and 
instinctive tendencies. 

Open by permission to graduate students. Three hours a week for a 
semester or for a year. Miss Calkins, Mr. Zigler. 

203. Reading Course in German or in French Psychological 
Texts. (Not given in 1924-25.) 

Open to students who are taking elective work in psychology. One hour 
a week for a year. Miss Gamble. 



Philosophy and Psychology 111 

III. Philosophy 

102. Introduction to Philosophy. This course includes a brief 
study of ethics, treated from a psychological starting point, as the science 
of the moral self. The emphasized topics are the nature of goodness 
and of duty and the relation of virtue to instinct and to habit. The 
greater part of the course is devoted to the discussion of philosophical 
problems including those which are raised in the study of psychology: 
the nature of body, the nature of mind, and the connection between mind 
and body. The relations of philosophy to physical science and to 
religion are also considered. The books upon which the discussion is based 
include Descartes, Meditations; La Mettrie, Man a Machine; Haeckel, 
The Riddle of the Universe; Berkeley, Principles of Human Knowledge 
and Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous. 

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have completed course 
101. Three hours a week for the second semester. 

Lecture divisions A and B, Miss Calkins; 

Division C, Mr. Procter. 

Conference divisions, Miss Calkins, Mr. Procter, 

Miss Day, Miss Cohen, Mrs. Taplin. 

205. Social Ethics. This course deals with the problems arising from 
the fact that human life is lived within groups. The first aim of the 
course is the definition of Justice. Various moral problems involved in 
social, political and economic life will then be discussed in the light of 
this concept. The readings will be from Plato's Republic, Aristotle's 
Politics, Hobbes's Leviathan, Rousseau's Social Contract and from such 
modern authors as Bertrand Russell, Bernhardi, Hobhouse, Bosanquet, 
and Carver. 

Open to students who have completed, or are taking, course 101. Three 
hours a week for the first semester. Mr. Procter. 

307. Greek Philosophy. Primarily text-study of the chief Greek 
philosophical writings, (a) Brief study of the Pre-Socratics: fragments of 
Heraklitus, Parmenides and Anaxagoras. (b) The Sophist movement. 
(c) Socrates and Plato: passages from Xenophon's Memorabilia; the 
Dialogues of Plato, including the Apology, Crito, Protagoras, Symposium, 
Phaedo, Theaetetus, Parmenides and extended passages from The Republic 
and the Timaeus. (d) Aristotle; selections from the Metaphysics, De 
Anima, the Nichomachean Ethics and the Politics, (e) The Stoics, 
Epicureans and Neo-Platonists: selections from Epictetus, Marcus Aure- 
lius and Plotinus. Discussion throughout with special emphasis on the 
relation of these authors to modern philosophical problems. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed courses 101.102 and, 
by permission to those who are taking courses 101.102. Three hours a 
week for a year. Mr. Procter. 



112 Courses of Instruction 

304. Problems of Modern Philosophy. This course is conducted 
through discussions, supplemented by occasional lectures, on problems of 
philosophy, including the nature of law and freedom, the relation of self 
to physical nature, the issues between realism and idealism, between 
pluralism and absolutism, and between pragmatism and rationalism. The 
study of these problems involves the critical reading of Hume's Inquiry 
Concerning Human Understanding and parts of the Treatise; of portions 
of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason and Metaphysic of Ethics; of Spinoza's 
Ethics; of Fichte's Vocation of Man; and of selected chapters and essays 
from the writings of recent and contemporary writers including Bergson, 
James, Royce, Ward, Bradley, Russell, Dewey, Pearson, and others. 

Open to juniors and seniors zvho have completed courses 101.102 and 
to graduate students. Three hours a week for a year. Miss Calkins. 

Lecturer on Realism: Mr. Montague. 

305. The Logic of Hegel. Text-study of the Logic of Hegel's Ency- 
clopedia, with occasional reference to commentators and critics, as basis 
for the discussion of philosophical method and of metaphysical problems. 

Open to seniors who have completed courses 307 and 304, or to seniors 
who have completed either 307 or 304 and are taking the other; and 
by special arrangement to graduate students. Three hours a week for 
the first semester. Miss Calkins. 

306. Philosophy of Religion. A critical examination of the bases of 
religious belief and especially of the meaning and value of the concept of 
God, both from the standpoint of philosophy and from that of religious 
worship. The course will include a consideration of various modern 
developments — psychological, anthropological, pragmatic and idealistic — 
in the Philosophy of Religion. 

Open to students who have completed course 305. Three hours a week 
for the second semester. Mr. Procter. 

321. Graduate Seminary. Ethics. (Not offered in 1924-25.) Sub- 
ject in 1923-24: The ethical doctrine of Kant and its critics. 

322. Graduate Seminary. Constructive Treatment of Problems 
OF Metaphysics. (Not offered in 1924-25.) 

Open by permission to graduate students. Three hours a week for a 
semester. Miss Calkins. 

323. Graduate Seminary. Special Study op Philosophical Sys- 
tems. (Not offered in 1924-25.) Subject in 1922-23: English Philosophy 
from Bacon to Locke. 

Open by permission to graduate students. Three hours a week for a 
semester. Miss Calkins. 



Physics 113 

325. Graduate Seminary. Current Tendencies in Contemporary 
Philosophy. 

Open by permission to graduate students. Three hours a week for a 
semester. Miss Calkins. 

Graduate Work 

The department offers to graduate students direction in independent 
work both in philosophy and in psychology, and conducts graduate con- 
ferences, with individual students, at stated times. 



PHYSICS 

Professor : Louise Sherwood McDoweul, Ph.D. (Chairman.) 
Associate Professors : Grace Evangeline Davis. M.A. 

Frances Lowater. Ph.D. 
Lucy Wilson, Ph.D. 
Lecturer .- Howard Edward Pulling.. Ph.D., 
professor of botany. 

INSTRUCTOR: HiLDA LYDIA BeGEMAN. M.A. 

Custodian : Helen Fay Porter. B.A. 

101. Elementary Physics. This course is for beginners and pre- 
sents briefly the elementary principles of mechanics, sound, heat, elec- 
tricity, and light, and their simpler applications. The course is conducted 
by means of experimental lectures and laboratory work. 

Open to students who have not offered Physics for admission. Three 
hours a week for a year. Miss McDowell, Miss Wilson, 

Miss Begeman. 

102. General Physics: Mechanics, Electricity, and Light. This 
course is intended for students who already have an elementary knowl- 
edge of the phenomena of the physical world; it gives a rapid survey of 
the fundamental principles in mechanics, magnetism and electricity, wave 
motion and light. It is conducted by means of experimental lectures 
and laboratory work. 

Open to students who have met the admission requirement and who 
are electing course 103 or 202. Three hours a week for the first semester. 

Miss Lowater. 

103. General Physics: Sound and Heat. This course continues the 
work of course 102. In sound, emphasis is laid on the physical basis of 
music; in heat, on the applications of the principles in daily life. 

Open to students who have completed course 102. Three hours a week 
for the second semester. Miss Lowater. 

201. Electricity. Topics include magnetic and electric fields of 
force; current, potential difference, resistance, capacity, electromagnetic 



114 Courses of Instruction 

induction. Lectures and laboratory work are closely correlated and 

measurements are made with instruments of precision. 

Open to students who have completed course 101 or 103, or 202, and 
by special permission to juniors and seniors who have met the admission 
requirement. Three hours a week for the first semester. Miss Davis. 

202. Heat. Thermometry, calorimetry, properties of vapors and 
gases, liquefaction of gases, transmission of heat and its application in 
the heating and ventilation of buildings, kinetic theory, elementary 
thermodynamics, heat engines. 

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have completed course 
201 and by permission to those who have completed course 101 or 102, or 
are taking course 101. Three hours a week for the second semester. 

Miss Davis. 

203. Meteorology. (Not given in 1924-25.) The study of the phe- 
nomena of the weather: air pressure, temperature, progress of storms, 
cold waves, winds, clouds, precipitation; the principles of weather predic- 
tion; atmospheric optical phenomena. 

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have completed course 
101 or who have met the admission requirement. Three hoiirs a week 
for the second semester. Miss Davis. 

204. The Automobile: Principles and Construction. The internal 
combustion engine; carburetors; systems of ignition, starting and light- 
ing, and transmission. Lectures with demonstrations to illustrate the 
physical principles involved. Individual laboratory study of various 
automobile mechanisms. 

Open by permission to juniors and seniors who have completed course 
101, or who have met the admission requirement. One hour a week for a 
year. Miss Wilson. 

SOL Light. The wave theory and its application to the phenomena 
of dispersion, interference, diffraction, polarization, propagation in crys- 
talline media; theory and use of optical instruments; modern methods of 
illumination. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed course 201. Three 
hours a week for the first semester. Miss Lowater. 

302. Electromagnetic Waves and Radio Communication. Alternat- 
ing currents, the effect of inductance and capacity; electric oscillations, 
damping, coupled circuits; electromagnetic waves; three-electrode vacuum 
tubes and their application to the transmission, reception and ampUfica- 



Physics 115 

tion of electromagnetic waves. Experimental lectures with individuaal 
laboratory study. 

Ope7i to juniors and seniors who have completed course 201. Three 
hours a week for the second semester. Miss McDowell. 

303. Electronic Physics. Electrolytic dissociation; conduction 
through gases; cathode rays; X-rays; radio-activity; electrons and protons; 
structure of the atom. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed course 201. Three 
hours a week for the first semester. Miss McDowell. 

304. Theoretical Electricity and Magnetism. (Not given in 1924- 
25.) The work is based upon Starling's Electricity and Magnetism and 
free use is made of the calculus. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed course 201 and also 
course 202 or 301 in Mathematics. Three hours a week for the first 
semester. Miss McDowell. 

305. Mechanics. Equations of motion; simple harmonic motion; cen- 
tral orbits; statics of rigid bodies; work, energy; dynamics of a particle; 
motion of rigid bodies. 

Open to students who have completed course 101 or 103, or 202 in 
Physics, course 202 or 301 in Mathematics and either course 304 in 
Physics or course 303 in Al at hematics. When combined with course 
303 in Mathematics it may be counted toward a major in Mathematics. 
Three hours a week for the second semester. Miss Lowater. 

307. Laboratory Practice. Laboratory practice arranged to fit the 
needs of the Individual student. Opportunity Is given for a series of 
experiments upon related topics and for training in laboratory technique 
such as scientific photography. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed or are taking a grade 
III course in the department. One hour a week for a year. 

Miss McDowell, Miss Davis, Miss Lowater, Miss Wilson. 

308. Bio-Physics. (Not given in 1924-25.) The course deals with our 
present conceptions of those physical processes that are fundamental to 
organisms. It Includes such topics as: properties of solutions (diffusion, 
osmosis, surface tension, etc.); properties of colloidal systems (swelling, 
coagulation, alteration of permeability In membranes, etc.); effects of 
heat, radiant energy. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed in college one year 
of Physics and one year of either Botany or Zoology. Three hours a 
week for the first semester. Mr. Pulling. 



116 Courses of Instruction 



READING AND SPEAKING 

Assistant Professors : Elizabeth Parker Hunt, M.A. (Chairman.) 

Edith Margaret Smailu.* 
Instructors j Edith Winifred Moses. M.A. 
Ruth Aikman Damon. M.A. 
Carol McMillan, ^ B.A. 

Six hours in this department in addition to course 104 may be counted 
within the minimum number of hours required for the B.A. degree. 

101. Reading and Speaking. It Is the purpose of this course to de- 
velop the ability to read aloud simply and easily and to speak with 
clearness and conviction. Various forms of literature studied, and exer- 
cises given to free the body and voice; phonetics and enunciation. 

Open to all undergraduates. Three hours a week for a year. 

Mrs. Hunt, Miss Smaill, Miss Moses, 
Mrs. Damon, Miss McMillan. 

102. English Speech. (Not offered in 1924-25.) This course is 
designed to teach foreigners the correct pronunciation of English; ffor 
students who intend to teach English speech to foreigners at home or 
abroad; and to help all students who need to overcome serious defects 
in speech. Attention is given to individual needs and special exercises 
prescribed. 

Open to all undergraduates. Advised for foreign students. Three 
hours a week for a year. Mrs. Hunt. 

103. Public Speaking. This course is designed to develop the ability 
to speak In public effectively. There will be the presentation and criti- 
cism of original speeches, and of speeches selected from famous addresses. 

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Three hours a week for a 
year. Miss Moses. 

104. Fundamentals of Speech. This course Is Intended to promote 
right habits in the production of voice for ordinary speaking and to 
Increase precision in articulation, enunciation and pronunciation. 

Required of sophomores except those who have completed or are 
taking course 101 or 103. One hour a week for a year. 

Mrs. Hunt, Miss Smaill, Miss Moses, 
Mrs. Damon, Miss McMillan. 

201. Advanced Course in Interpretative Reading. The study and 
presentation of various forms of standard literature. This, course Is 
designed primarily to develop the Imaginative and creative power of the 
Individual and to arouse an appreciation of the educational value of 

*Absent on leave for the first semester. 
•Appointed for the first semester only. 



Spanish 117 

interpretative expression. Tennyson, Browning, Modern Poetry, and 
Drama. 

Open to students who have completed one three-hour course in the de- 
partment. Three hours a week for a year. 

First Semester, Miss McMillan. 
Second Semester, Miss Smaill. 

301. Interpretation of Shakespeare. Intensive study of the text 
for expression; the giving under student management of all the great 
scenes in a play. Three plays studied. 

Open to students who have completed one three-hour course in the. 
department, also to those who have completed or are taking English Lit- 
erature 305 or 309. Three hours a week for a year. Mrs. Hunt. 



SPANISH 

Professor: Alice Huntington Bushee,^ M.A. 
Assistant Professor : Ada May Coe, M.A. (Chairman.) 

INSTRUCTORS: CARIDAD RODRICJUEZ-CASTEULANO, M.A. 

Concha Breton, B.A. 

A reading knowledge of French is required for all grade III work and 
desirable in all courses. The language of the class room is Spanish. 

101$. Elementary Course. Grammar, composition, dictation, con- 
versation, prepared and sight translation. Short lectures are given in 
Spanish on different literary subjects to train the ear and serve as an 
introduction to later study. 

Open to all undergraduates. Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss Coe, Miss Rodriguez. 

102. Intermediate Course. Grammar, composition, themes, lectures, 
reading of typical modern novels and selections from Don Quijote. 

Open to students who have completed course 101 or an equivalent. 
Three hours a week for a year. Miss Breton. 

201. Spanish Literature in the Eig'hteenth and Nineteenth 
Centuries. The aim of this course is to give the student a general 
idea of Spanish literature after the Golden Age: the French influence. 
Romanticism, and the noted authors of the latter part of the nineteenth 
century. This includes the rapid reading of both prose and poetry. 

Open to students who have completed course 102. Three hours a week 
for a year. Miss Breton. 

202. Modern Spanish American Literature. The aim of this course 
is to show the influences at work in the making of Spanish American 

^Absent on leave. 

^Spanish 101 may not be counted toward the B.A. degree if taken after the 
junior year. 



118 Courses Of Instruction 

Literature with the reaction, especially in poetry, on the literature of 
Spain. Lectures will be given on the political and social conditions of 
the leading countries. 

Open to students who have completed course 102. Three hours a week 
for a year. Miss Coe. 

203. Advanced Conversation and Composition. Three or four 
twentieth century plays will form the basis for this course and will give 
opportunity for oral discussion and written reports on life in contem- 
porary Spain. 

Open to students who have completed course 102. One hour a week 
for a year. Miss Rodriguez. 

204. Contemporary Spanish Literature. A survey of the literary 
movement since 1898 with special emphasis on the novel and drama. 

Open to students who have completed course 102. Course 204 can- 
not be taken without course 203. Two hours a week for a year. 

Miss Rodriguez. 

301. Drama of the Golden Age. This course will be introduced by 
a short general outline of the historical and literary influences at work 
during the period. Characteristic dramas of Lope de Vega, Alarcon, 
Tirso de Molina, and Calderon will be studied as representative of the 
nation's thought and ideals at the time. 

Open to students who have completed course 201 or 202, or 203 and 
204. Three hours a week for a year. Miss Rodriguez. 

302. The Spanish Novel. The first semester will be devoted to a 
general study of the novel before 1650 (especially the caballeresca, picar- 
esca, and pastoral) and its relation to other countries. During the second 
semester Don Quijote will be studied. 

Open to students who have completed course 201 or 202, or 203 and 
204. Three hours a week for a year. Miss Coe. 

303. Old Spanish Literature from 1150 to 1400. (Not offered in 
1924-25.) Study of El Poema del Cid and other characteristic works 
of the period. 

Open to graduates and to approved seniors who have had at least one 
course of grade III. Three hours a week for a year. 



Zoology and Physiology 119 



ZOOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY 

Professors : Marian Elizabeth Hubbard. B.S. (Chairman.) 
Julia Eleanor Moody, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor : Alice Middleton Boring,* Ph.D. 
Visiting Associate Professor : Philip Henry Mitchell. Ph.D. 
Instructors : Margaret Alger Hayden, Ph.D. 
Harriet Cutler Waterman, M.A. 
Gladys Kathryn McCosh, M.S. 
Janet Agnes Williamson, M.A. 
Edith Steele Bowen, M.A. 
Elizabeth Macnaughton, M.D. 
Marjorie Boyd, B.S. 
Curator : Albert Pitts Morse. 
Laboratory Assistants : Marion Freeman Lewis, B.A. 

Frances Barbara Martin, B.S. 
Custodian : Kathleen Millicent Leavitt. 

101. The Biology of Animals. This course serves as an introduction 
to the general principles of Zoology. The study of a series of animal 
forms, of increasing complexity, develops a conception both of what an 
animal is, and of how animals have arisen through evolution in the past. 
The study of animal cells, particularly the germ cells, leads to an under- 
standing of the mechanism of heredity. Through the application of 
biological principles to man the student obtains gradually a knowledge of 
the human machine, a sense of the place of man in the world of living 
things, and some comprehension of the steps by which he has arisen. 
Based upon and supplementing the data gained in the laboratory at first 
hand, there runs through the second semester a series of lectures and 
discussions on the evidences and factors of evolution, on heredity and 
eugenics. 

Open to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors. Three hours a week for 
a year. 

Miss Hxjbbard, Miss Hayden, Miss Waterman* 
Miss McCosh, Miss Williamson, Miss Bowen, 

Zoology 

201. Invertebrate Zoology. (Not offered In 1924-25.) A study of 
invertebrate types, except the Arthropoda, with reference to their struc- 
ture, life-history, habits, and distribution; emphasis is given to the gen- 
eral principles of evolution. Lectures, laboratory, field and museum trips. 

Open to students who have completed course 101, Three hours a week 
for the first semester. 

202. Invertebrate Zoology. (Not offered in 1924-25.) A study of 
the Arthropoda with special reference to the group of insects; their struc- 
ture, life-history and habits. Attention will be given to insects of eco- 
nomic importance, such as the silk-worm, the disease carriers, household 

^Absent on leave. 



120 Courses of Instruction 

Insects and those injurious to vegetables, fruit and trees. Lectures, lab- 
oratory, field and museum trips. 

Open to students who have completed course 201, and by permission 
of the department to students who have completed course 101. Three 
hours a week for the second semester. 

203. Vertebrate Zoology. Evidences of evolution from the study of 
comparative anatomy and the development of the vertebrates, based 
upon a careful dissection of dogfish, necturus, reptile, and cat. The aim 
throughout is to trace the evolution of the vertebrate type with par- 
ticular reference to the history of the human body. Lectures, laboratory 
and museum work. 

Open to juniors and seniors without prerequisites, and to other stu- 
dents who have completed course 101. Three hours a week for a year. 

Miss Moody, Miss Waterman. 

301. Mammalian Anatomy. (Hygiene 30L) Lectures and labora- 
tory work on the gross anatomy of bones and muscles; digestive, respira- 
tory, excretory, reproductive, circulatory and nervous systems. Special 
emphasis is given to the study of the human skeleton and muscles. 

Required of first-year students in the Department of Hygiene and 
Physical Education; also of juniors who are registered as jive-year Hygiene 
students. If counted as part of a major in Zoology, course 301 should 
be preceded by course 101. One and one-half hours a week for a year. 

Dr. Macnaughton, Miss Waterman. 

303. Histology. A systematic study of typical preparations covering 
the microscopic structure of the fundamental tissues and some of the 
organs of the animal body. A general, working knowledge of histological 
technique is acquired as most of the preparations used are made entirely 
by the student. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed or are taking course 
203 or 308. Three hours a week for the first semester. 

Miss Williamson, 

304. Embryology. A study of the processes and principles of animal 
development. The illustrative material includes some Invertebrates for 
early stages, and for later stages the chick and pig. A practical knowledge 
of general embryological technique is acquired. Microscopic preparations 
of a series of stages of the chick are made by each student. 

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed or are taking course 
203 or 308. Three hours a week for the second semester. 

Miss Williamson. 

305. Theories and Problems of Zoology. A critical study of the 
past and present theories and problems of Zoology, and the history of 



Zoology and Physiology 121 

their development; including the questions of the origin of life, develop- 
ment, evolution, and heredity. 

Open to students completing a twelve-hour major, and under special 
conditions to others with the approval of the department. Three hours 
a week for the second semester. Miss Moody. 

306. Heredity. Problems in variation and heredity, with a critical 
study of the cytological and genetical evidence found in animals, and the 
application of these principles to human inheritance. Practical breeding 
tests with Drosophlla and guinea-pigs. Discussion of recent papers bear- 
ing on these problems. 

Open to students completing a twelve-hour major; to five-year Hygiene 
students completing a major in Zoology, and to others under certain 
conditions with the approval of the department. Three hours a week 
for the first semester. Miss Moody. 

307. Research. Elementary problems in Histology, Embryology, In- 
vertebrate or Vertebrate Zoology, Physiology. Independent work will be 
required of the student under the direction of the Instructor in the field 
chosen. 

Open with the advice of the department to students who have com- 
pleted or are completing a nine-hour major in Zoology. One and one- 
half to three hours a zveek for a year or three hours a week for a semester. 
For graduate students or students working for honors, one and one-half 
to six hours a week for a year, or three to six hours for a semester. 

321. Seminar. Reports and discussion of current Investigations in 
Zoology and Physiology, under the guidance of the staff, and as a part of 
the departmental Journal Club. 

Open to graduate students and to approved seniors. One hour a week 
for a year. The Teaching Staff. 

Physiology 

302. General Physiology. (Special Course for Hygiene Students. 
Hygiene 302.) In this course are studied the physical phenomena un- 
derlying the functions of animal organisms, such as osmosis, surface ten- 
sion, cell-permeability, etc., and the part played by them in normal 
physiological processes. A brief survey of human histology serves as a 
basis for studying the application of these principles to human physiology. 

Required of first-year students in the Department of Hygiene and 
Physical Education; also of seniors registered as five-year Hygiene stu- 
dents; open to those juniors registered as five-year Hygiene students 
who plan to elect a second course in Physiology in the Department of 
Zoology and Physiology. Other students take 308. If counted as part 



122 Courses of Instruction 

of a major in Zoology, course 302 should be preceded by course 101. 
Three hours a week for a year. Mr. Mitchell, Miss Boyd. 

307. Research. See Zoology. 

308. General Physiology. This course aims to present the funda- 
mental facts and theories which underlie the normal functions of animal 
organisms. It studies the action of the various organ systems, such as 
the muscular and nervous, digestive, respiratory, circulatory, excretory, 
and reproductive, and includes a brief survey of foods and a considera- 
tion of the problems of nutrition and metabolism. 

Open to students who have completed course 101, and who have com- 
pleted or are taking an elementary course in Chemistry; ®r to students 
who in addition to fulfilling the Chemistry requirement have completed 
or are taking Zoology 203. Three hours a week for a year. Miss BoYt). 

309. Metabolism. (Not offered in 1924-25.) Properties and com- 
position of living matter; nutrition; metabolism; excretion. A preliminary 
consideration of these processes as general properties of living matter 
will be followed by a more extended study of their occurrence in the 
normal human being. The latter part of the work will deal in detail 
with pregnancy, fetal life and childhood. 

Open to students who have completed course 308 or 302 and Chemistry 
301. Three hotirs a week for a year. 

311. Physiology of the Nervous System, Special Senses, and 
Glands of Internal Secretion. (Not given in 1924-25.) A study of 
the nervous and chemical control of the organism through the central 
nervous system, the organs of special sense and the glands of internal 
secretion. It includes a consideration of theories of irritability, conduc- 
tivity, etc., and of the physiological basis of mental processes. A brief 
study of certain types of defectives will be made. 

Open to students who have completed course 308 or 302. Three hours 
a week for a year. 

321. Seminar. See Zoology. 



Examinations 123 

COLLEGE EXAMINATIONS 

An examination period occurs at the end of each semester. At these 
periods, and also during the days of the admission examinations in 
September, examinations for the removal of conditions and deficiencies 
and for advanced standing may be taken. 

A student who wishes to take an examination upon a course which is 
not a part of her approved schedule for the year, must apply to the 
Dean of the College for the requisite card of admission to the examination. 
The last day for receiving applications for such cards is for the September 
examinations, September first; for the mid-year examinations, January 
first; for the June examinations, May first. 

N. B. Examinations for the removal of conditions and deficiencies 
excepted, no student can be admitted to examination upon a course which 
is not a part of her approved schedule for the year without permission 
both from the Head of the Department concerned and the Dean of the 
College. No student, therefore, should enter upon preparation for such 
an examination until her plan has been approved by both of the above 
named officers. 

11^^ The College reserves the right to require the withdrawal of stu- 
dents whose scholarship is not satisfactory, and of those who for any 
other reason are regarded as not in accord with the ideals and standards 
which the College seeks to maintain. 

EXPENSES 

TUITION 

The charge for tuition to all students, whether living in college build- 
ings or not, is $300 a year. Tuition is payable in advance and is not 
subject to return or deduction. 

Students who are permitted to take seven hours or less of class room 
work a week, and who do not live in college buildings, pay tuition by 
the course as follows: for a one-hour course, $35; a two-hour course, $70; 
a three-hour course, $100. Payment is due at the beginning of the year. 
No charge is made for tuition in Biblical History. 

TUITION AND OTHER CHARGES IN DEPARTMENT 

OF MUSIC 

For instruction for the college year in Pianoforte, Organ, 

Violin or Voice, two lessons a week . . . . $150 

One lesson a week 75 

(Lessons thirty minutes in length) 



124 Expenses 

For use of the Pianoforte, one period daily for the college year $15 

For two and three periods daily, in proportion. 

For use of the Pipe Organ in Music Hall, one period daily, 

for the college year 20 

For two or three periods daily, in proportion. 

Special arrangements may be made for lessons on Instruments not 
mentioned above. 

Tuition in music is payable in advance in two equal installments, one 
at the beginning of each semester, and is not subjea to return or 
deduction. 

FIXED TIMES AND AMOUNTS OF PAYMENTS 

/. For students who room in college buildings. 

Application fee payable in advance $ 10 

September (at the opening of college) 

On account of tuition 3190 

On account of departmental fee 5 

On account of board and room 250 445 

February (before the beginning of the second semester) 

Balance on tuition $100 

Balance on departmental fee 5 

Balance on board and room • • 250 355 

Total for the year ^^10 

The regular charge for board begins at the opening of dormitories. 

//. For students who do not room in college buildings. 

a. Students who take their meals in college buildings, but room in 

private houses. 

Application fee payable in advance $ 10 

September (at the opening of college) 

On account of tuition ^1"0 

On account of departmental fee 5 

On account of board 1^5 360 

February (before the beginning of the second semester) 

Balance on tuition ^100 

Balance on departmental fee 5 

Balance on board 1^0 265 

Total for year ^^^^ 

Such students make payments for rooms directly to the householder at 
such rates and times as the parties to the arrangement may agree upon. 



Fees 125 

Information regarding boarding places may be obtained by addressing the 
Dean of Residence. 

b. Students who neither board nor room in college buildings pay 
tuition and departmental fee as follows: — 

Application fee payable in advance $ 10 

September (at the opening of college) 195 

February (before the beginning of the second semester) . 105 



Total for the year $310 

Such students make payment for room and board directly to the 
management of the private houses in which they have secured lodg- 
ing and meals, at such rates and times as the parties to the arrange- 
ment may agree upon. Information regarding boarding places may 
be obtained by addressing the Dean of Residence. 

i^^Payments must be made before the student can take her place in 
the class foom. No exception will be made to this rule without a written 
permission from the Treasurer. 

2^^ Checks or money orders should be made payable to Wellesley 
College. 



FEES 

/. Undergraduate. 

a. Application Fee. 

An application fee of $10 is required from all candidates for admission, 
and no application is recorded until the fee is received. The same fee 
is required from all students in college who are intending to return for 
the following year, and from all former students who apply for readmis- 
sion. If the student enters college, the amount of the application fee is 
deducted from the first tuition bill after entrance. If the application is 
cancelled for any reason the fee is forfeited to the college. A student who 
postpones entrance until the year following the one for which she first 
applied may transfer her application fee. 

b. Departmental Fee. 

Beginning in September, 1923, a fee of ten dollars will be required of 
every undergraduate, payable in tzvo equal installments with the pay- 
ments for board and tuition. This fee supersedes the science and other 
small departmental fees hitherto charged, and is not subject to refund. 
Deposits to cover breakage and the use of equipment will still be required 
in some cases, but these deposits are repaid if there is no loss or damage 
to the equipment used. 



126 Residence 

c. Diploma Fee. 

At the time of taking the B.A. degree or the certificate in Hygiene 
and Physical Education, a diploma fee of $10 is charged. 

Every student should also reckon on an expenditure of $15 to $30 
annually for the purchase of books. 

//. Graduate. 

A matriculation fee of $5 Is payable when a student Is accepted as a 
candidate for the Master's degree. The amount of this fee will be 
deducted from the diploma fee of $25 payable when the degree is 
received. 

{J^^ No student may receive a diploma until a satisfactory settlement 
of all her college dues has been made. 

RESIDENCE 

The residence halls belonging to the College and situated within the 
limits of the campus are Stone, Norumbega, Freeman, Wood, Fiske, 
Wilder, Pomeroy, Cazenove, Beebe, Shafer, Tower Court, Claflin, Craw- 
ford, Dower House, and The Homestead. Eliot, Washington, Noanett, 
Crofton and Little Houses, also the property of the College, and five 
houses leased to the College for dormitory purposes in order to meet 
temporary needs, are situated outside and immediately adjoining the 
college grounds. All these houses are under the direction of officers 
appointed by the College. All the rooms are furnished, and supplied 
with electric lights. 

B^^ A student vacating a room before the close of the year, or 
relinquishing a room reserved for her at the beginning of the year, will 
be charged for board, until the vacancy has been filled by an incoming 
student, at the rate of not less than $15 a week. Any number of days 
less than one week will be charged as one full week, the minimum 
charge being for one full week. Therefore, notice of intention to withdraw 
should be given at the earliest possible moment. No deduction is made 
for absences during the year. 

Applications for rooms in college buildings take the date at which the 
application fee is received. (See pages 18 and 125.) 

Until May first, but not after that date, applications from former 
students will take precedence of those of new students In the matter of 
rooms. 

HEALTH 

The resident physician, Katharine P. Raymond, B.S., M.D., together 
with the Director of the Department of Hygiene and Physical Education, 
the Dean of Residence, and the President and the Dean of the College 



Fellowships and Scholarships 127 

ex officio, constitute a board of health to which all matters affecting the 
health of students are referred. Simpson Cottage is maintained as an 
infirmary under the charge of Dr. Raymond. A neighboring cottage has 
recently been fitted up as an annex. Three trained nurses are In constant 
attendance. The privileges of the Infirmary when prescribed by the 
Resident Physician are open to all students without charge for a period 
not exceeding seven days provided no extra service is required. There 
will be a charge at the rate of $2.25 a day for periods exceeding seven 
days. Charges for extra service will be determined by the amount 
required. The services of the Resident Physician for consultation and 
treatment are free to all students. 



FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 
A. For Graduates 

The Alice Freeman Palmer Fellowship, yielding an income of about 
$1,000, was founded in 1903, by Mrs. David P. Kimball. 

The holder of this Fellowship must be a graduate of Wellesley College 
or some other American College of approved standing, a young woman of 
good health, not more than twenty-six years of age at the time of her 
appointment, unmarried throughout the whole of her tenure, and as free 
as possible from other responsibilities. The same person will not be 
eligible to the Fellowship for more than two years. 

The Fellowship may be used for study abroad, for study at any Ameri- 
can college or university, or privately for independent research. Several 
times during the period of tenure the holder of the Fellowship must fur- 
nish evidence that it is used for purposes of serious study and not for 
general culture; and within three years from entrance on the Fellowship 
she must present to the faculty a thesis embodying the results of the 
research carried on during the period of tenure. 

Applications for this Fellowship should be received by the President of 
Wellesley College not later than February first of the academic year pre- 
ceding that for which the Fellowship is asked. These applications must 
be accompanied by theses or papers presenting evidence of the most 
advanced work of the candidates, since the Fellowship is not assigned on 
the basis of unsupported credentials, however commendatory. 

The Horton-Hallowell Fellowship is offered by the Alumns Asso- 
ciation of Wellesley College. This fellowship is in honor of Mary E. 
Horton, Wellesley's first professor of Greek, and Susan M. Hallowell, 
Wellesley's first professor of Botany, and is available to those holding 
the B.A. or M.A. degree from Wellesley, for graduate study in candidacy 
for the M.A. or Ph.D. degree, or for independent research of equivalent 
standard. 



128 Fellowships and Scholarships 

Application should be made by personal letter from the candidate. 
This should be accompanied by a certified record of her college work, 
testimonials from instructors as to ability and achievement in the lines 
of study proposed, testimonials from qualified judges as to health and 
character, and specimens of scientific or literary work in the form of 
publications, papers, notes, outlines, collections, etc. 

Applications for this fellowship should be received by the Chairman 
of the Fellowship Committee, Alumnae Office, Wellesley College, not 
later than February fifteenth of the academic year preceding that for 
which the fellowship is asked. The amount of this fellowship has been 
fixed for 1924-25 at $1,000. 

The Ruth Ingersol Goldmark Memorial Fund was established by 
Mr. C. J. Goldmark in 1917 to aid deserving students doing graduate 
work at Wellesley College or elsewhere in English Literature or English 
Composition or the Classics, English Literature being given the preference. 
The income at present is $250. 

Applications for aid from this fund should be received by the Chair- 
man of the Department of English Literature, not later than April first 
of the academic year preceding that for which the aid is asked. 

Research Fellowship for the Study of Orthopedics in Relation 
TO Hygiene and Physical Education, amounting to $1000. 

The general requirements to be met by applicants are as follows: — good 
health, the Bachelor's degree from a college or university of good stand- 
ing; sound preparation in chemistry, physics, and biology; special prepara- 
tion in anatomy, kinesiology and physiology; familiarity with the elements 
of orthopedic theory and practice; and an insight Into some one or more 
of the problems of orthopedics as related to hygiene and physical education. 

The work on the problem chosen in consultation with the department 
must be done in residence at Wellesley College. It will, in general, begin 
in the September following the acceptance of the applicant and will 
continue through one calendar year. It will Involve kinesiology, applied 
physiology, and the study of clinical material. For the latter, oppor- 
tunity will be provided to study the work of orthopedic surgeons in 
Boston and other eastern cities. The results of the investigation are to 
be embodied in a thesis to be submitted to the department and published. 

Applications for this fellowship should be received by the Director, 
Department of Hygiene and Physical Education, Wellesley College, 
Wellesley, Mass., not later than March first of the academic year preced- 
ing that for which the fellowship is asked. The decision reached by the 
department will be based upon the applicant's record, upon personal 
correspondence, and when possible, upon personal Interviews. 

Eighteen Graduate Scholarships to the value of $300 a yt:ar, 
the equivalent of one year's tuition, have been established for the benefit 
of approved candidates for the M.A. degree in residence at Wellesley. 



Fellowships and Scholarships 129 

Application for one of these scholarships should be made by personal 
letter from the candidate to the Chairman of the Committee on Graduate 
Instruction, Wellesley College. 

Graduate Study in Classics: — 

The American School of Classical Studies in Athens offers special oppor- 
tunity for graduate study in Greek. Membership, without tuition*, is 
open to all graduates and graduate students of Wellesley College who 
have done sufficient work in Greek and Archaeology to profit by the 
opportunity. The object of the School is to furnish an opportunity to 
study in Greece the literature, art, antiquities and history of the country 
under suitable guidance; to prosecute and to aid original research in these 
subjects; and to conduct the exploration and excavation of classic sites. 
Three fellowships of $1000 each are awarded annually on the basis of 
competitive examinations and are open to graduates of the co-operating 
colleges of which Wellesley College is one. For further information apply 
to Professor Edwards. 

The American School of Classical Studies in Rome is an integral 
part of The American Academy. The object of this School is to promote 
the study of classical literature in its bearing upon antiquities and history; 
of classical, Etruscan and Italian art and archaeology, including topography, 
palaeography and epigraphy, and of the art and archaeology of the early 
Christian, Mediaeval and Renaissance periods withm the boundaries of 
Italy. It furnishes regular instruction and guidance in some or all of 
these subjects, encourages and assists in original research and exploration. 
Students should have the ability to read ordinary Greek and Latin prose 
at sight and to use French and German as instruments of research; they 
will find an elementary knowledge of Italian very useful. Duly qualified 
graduates of Wellesley College are exempt from any charge for tuition. 
Two Fellowships in the School of Classical Studies are offered by the 
Academy, one of the value of $1,000. for one year and one of the value 
of $1,000. a year for two years. The academic year begins on the first 
day of October and students are expected to report in Rome at the 
Academy on that day. A Summer School established in 1923 offers a 
programme of great value for students and teachers of the classics. 
For further information application may be made to Professor Hawes. 

Scholarships in the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods 
Hole. — Admission to courses at Woods Hole is upon a selective basis. 
Wellesley College offers annually two scholarships to applicants who are 
successful candidates. This laboratory is primarily for research, but in 
the summer courses of instruction are offered, four in Zoology and one 
in Botany. The purpose of these courses Is to aid in the production 
and training of investigators, and first consideration Is given to persons 

*The income of the Jvtlia Josephine Irvine Fund makes possible the 
studentships in the American School of Classical Studies in Athens. 



130 Scholarships 

who, whether graduate or undergraduate, give promise of contributing 
to the advancement of science. Applicants must have completed a college 
course in the subject in which they wish to work. The laboratory offers 
besides these courses of instruction, opportunity for research, either under 
direction or independent. In addition, there are courses of lectures on 
special topics and on subjects of general biological interest. 

Applicants should state the character of the work to be done, whether 
botanical or zoological, whether courses of instruction are desired, or 
investigation directed. All applications should be forwarded to Professor 
Ferguson or Professor Hubbard in time to reach Wellesley College before 
April first. These applications will be forwarded to Woods Hole to be 
acted upon May fifteenth, after which date notification will be sent to 
the successful candidates. 

The Loretto Fish Carney Memorial Fund was founded in 1920 by 
the alumna and staff of the Boston Normal School of Gymnastics and 
the Department of Hygiene and Physical Education of Wellesley College, 
the income to be awarded to a senior in the department at the discretion 
of the teaching staif of the department and the President of the College. 
(Accumulating.) 

The Amy Morris Homans Scholarship Fund of $6000, presented in 
1924 by the Mary Hemenway Alumnae Association of the graduate 
department of Hygiene and Physical Education in honor of Miss Amy 
Morris Homans, pioneer and leader in physical education in the United 
States, to be awarded to a student in the graduate department of Hygiene 
and Physical Education who is in need of assistance and shows proficiency 
and promise. 

B. For Undergraduates 

The income of these scholarships is applied to the aid of meritorious 
undergraduate students whose personal means are insufficient for their 
maintenance in college. 

The Wood Memorial Scholabship of $5,000, founded in 1878 by 

Caroline A. Wood, in memory of her husband, Caleb Wood. 
The Gbover Scholabship of $5,000, founded in 1878 by William O. 

Grover. 
The Weston Scholarship of $5,000, founded in 1878 by David M. 

Weston. 
The Northpield Seminary Scholarship of $5,000, founded in 1878. 
The Pauline A. Durant Scholarship of $7,315, founded in 1880 by 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry F. Durant, and raised to its present amount 

by bequest of Mrs. Durant in 1919. 
The Sweatman Scholarship of $5,000, founded in 1880 by V. 

Clement Sweatman. 



Scholarships 131 

TiiE Waltee Baker Memorial Scholarship, founded in 1880 by- 
Eleanor J. W. Baker; raised to $7,000 by the will of Mrs. Baker 

in 1892. 
The Aknie M. Wood Scholarship, founded in 1880 by Frank Wood, 

who maintained it by annual payments; capitalized at $10,000 

in 1915 by bequest of Mr. Wood. 
Two Frost Scholarships, founded in 1880 by Rufus S. Frost, as 

follows : — 

One of $1,000, the income to be given annually to some member 
of the graduating class designated by the Faculty. 

One of $5,000, the income to be devoted annually to the aid of 
students. 
The Union Church Scholarship, founded in 1880 by Mr. and 

Mrs. A. W. Stetson. 
The Florence N. Brown Memorial Scholarship of $5,000, foimded 

in 1880 by Mr. and Mrs. Samuel N. Brovv^n, Jr. 
The Augustus R. Clark Memorial Scholarship of $5,000, founded 

in 1880 by Mr. and Mrs. A. N. Clark. 
Four Harriet Fowle Smith Scholarships, founded in 1881 by 

Henry Fowle Durant, in memory of his mother. 
The Durant Memorial Scholarship of $5,000, founded in 1883 by 

the ofiicers and students of Wellesley College, in honor of Henry 

F. Durant, the income to be appropriated annually to some 

student selected by the Faculty. 
The Jane Topliff Memorial Scholarship of $6,000, founded in 1883 

by Mrs. William S. Houghton, in memory of her mother. 

The Income of a Fund of $25,000, known as the Stone Educational 
(Scholarship) Fund, founded in 1884 by Valeria G. Stone. 

The Jennie L. White Scholarship of $5,000, founded in 1886 by 
herself. 

The Mr. and Mrs. Solomon F. Smith Memorial Scholarship of 
$200 annually, founded in 1888 by George Smith, for the tuition 
of students from the town of Wellesley. 

The Margaret McClung Cowan Fund of $1,000, founded in 1888 
by Rev. and Mrs. P. D. Cowan, in memory of their daughter. 

The Emmelar Scholarship of $5,000, founded in 1889 by the class 
of 1891, the income to be appropriated annually to some student 
selected by the Faculty. 

The Sarah J. Houghton Scholarship of $6,000, founded in 1889 
by William S. Houghton, in memory of his wife. 

The Edith Baker Memorial Scholarship of $7,000, founded by 
bequest of Eleanor J. W. Baker in 1892. 

The Joseph N. Fiske Memorial Scholarship of $8,000, founded in 
1892 by Mrs. Fiske. 

The Abbee A. Coburn Memorial Scholarship of $2,000, founded in 
1892. 



132 Scholarships 

The Eluba C. Jewett Scholarship of $6,000, founded in 1894; the 

income to be appropriated to the daughter of a clergyman, or 

of a home or foreign missionary, selected by the Faculty of the 

College. 
The Ada L. Howard Scholarship of $6,000, founded in 1895. 
The Helen Day Gould Scholarship, founded in 1896 by Helen 

Miller Gould (Shepard), in memory of her mother; raised to 

$10,000 by the donor in 1901. 
The Goodwin Scholarship of $5,000, founded in 1897 by Hannah B. 

Goodwin. 
The Hyde Scholarship of $2,000, founded inl 1898 by Sarah B. 

Hyde. 
The Bill Scholarship of $7,000, founded in 1898 by Charles Bill. 
The Holbrook Scholarship of $3,000, founded in 1898 by Sarah J. 

Holbrook. 

The (second) Helen Day Gould Scholarship, founded in 1899 by 
Helen Miller Gould (Shepard) ; raised to $10,000 by the donor 
in 1901. 

The Mary Elizabeth Gere Scholarship of $5,000, founded in 1899 
by Mary Elizabeth Gere. 

The Ann Morton Towle Memorial Scholarship Fund of $5,000, 
established in 1901 by bequest of George Francis Towle. 

The Dana Scholarship of $5,000, founded in 1901 through the gift 
of Charles B. Dana. 

The (third) Helen Day Gould Scholarship of $10,000, founded 
in 1901 by Helen Miller Gould (Shepard). 

The George William Towle Memorial Scholarship Fund of $6,750, 
founded in 1901 by bequest of George Francis Towle. 

The Anna Palen Scholarship of $10,000, founded in 1902. 

The Rollins Scholarship of $8,000, founded in 1903 by Augusta 
and Hannah H. Rollins, in memory of their parents. 

The Class of 1889 Memorial Scholarship of $1,000, founded in 1904 
by the class, in memory of classmates who have died. 

The Elizabeth S. Fiske Scholarship of $5,000, founded in 1904 by 
bequest of Miss Fiske. 

The Mae McElwain Rice Memorial Scholarship of $1,000, founded 
in 1905 by the class of 1902. 

The Sanborn Alumnae Scholarship, founded in 1905 by Helen J. 
Sanborn of the class of 1884 for the benefit of daughters of 
alumnae; capitalized at $10,000 in 1919 by bequest of Miss 
Sanborn. 

The Julia Ball Thayer Scholarship of $2,000, founded in 1907 
by bequest of Mrs. Julia Beatrice Ball Thayer of Keene, N. H. 

The Adams Scholarship of $2,000, founded in 1907 by bequest of 
Adoniram J. Adams of Boston. 



Scholarships 133 

The McDonald-Ellis Fund of $600, established in 1908 by former 
students of the McDonald-Ellis School of Washington, D. C, in 
memory of the late principals of the school. 

The Ransom Scholabship of $1,000, founded in 1908 by bequest of 
Catherine Ayer Ransom. 

The Emily P. Hidden Scholarship of $2,000, founded in 1909 by 
bequest of Mary E. Hidden. 

The Ethel Howland Folger Williams Memorial Fund, established 
in 1911 from the estate of the late Ethel Howland Folger Wil- 
liams of the class of 1905, the income to be given to a sophomore 
at the end of the first semester at the discretion of the head of 
the German Department, 

The Sophie Jewett Memorial Scholarship of $1,000, founded in 
1911 by Elsa D. James. 

The Mildred Keim Fund of $10,000, founded in 1912 by Newton 
and Frances S. Keim, in memory of their daughter, Mildred 
Keim. 

The Connecticut Scholarship of $5,000, founded in 1912 by the 
will of Louise Frisbie. 

The Anna S. Newman Memorial Scholarship of $1,000, established 
in 1913 through the gift of former students. 

The Mary G. Hillman Mathematical (Prize) Scholarship of 
$1,000, established in 1913 by Elizabeth A. Hillman, in memory 
of her sister. 

The Class of 1893 Memorial Scholarship of $5,000, established by 
the class in 1913. 

The M. Elizabeth Gray Scholarship of $10,000, established in 1914 
by bequest of William J. Gray. 

The Cora Stickney Harper Scholarship of $2,000, established in 
1915 by bequest of Mrs. Cora Stickney Harper. 

The Oliver N., Mary C, and Mary Shannon Scholarship Fund 
of $15,000, established in 1916 by bequest of Mary Shannon, as 
a permanent fund for scholarships. 

The Dr. Alma Emerson Beale Scholarship Fund of $3,000, founded 
in 1917 by bequest of Dr. Alma E. Beale of the class of 1891; 
the income to be applied annually to a student of the College 
who intends to become either a foreign or a home missionary, 
or, second, to a student of the College who is the daughter 
of a clergyman. 

The Stimson Mathematical Scholarship of $100 annually, founded 
in 1919 by Candace C. Stimson in memory of her father. Dr. 
Lewis A. Stimson. 

The Marie Louise Tuck Scholarship Fund of $9,500, founded in 
1919 by bequest of Alice C. Tuck. 

The Class of 1884 Memorial Scholarship, founded by the Class in 
1919 (accumulating). 



134 Scholarships 

The Charles B. Botsford Scholarship Fuitd of $5,000, founded in 

1920 by bequest of Lucy A. Botsford. 
The Katharine Knapp Scholarship of $5,000, founded in 1920 by 

bequest of Miss Knapp. 
The Elizabeth and Susan Cushman Scholarship Fund, founded 

in 1923 by bequest of Susan L. Cushman of the class of 1891 

(accumulating). 
The Norma Liebermann Decker Scholarship of $5,000, founded 

(1924) in memory of Mrs. Decker by her mother, Mrs. Emma 

Liebermann. 

These scholarships are in general not competitive. They are awarded 
in recognition of genuine pecuniary need and of satisfactory character, 
college citizenship, health, and Intellectual and practical ability as tested 
by a year or more of life and study at Wellesley. The foundations are 
of varying amounts, and the income is apportioned according to need 
and merit as justly as possible. No scholarship yields the full amount 
required for both tuition and residence on the ordinary plan. Although 
there is no special provision for scholarship aid during the freshman 
year, any school principal or teacher having in view a candidate, thor- 
oughly prepared for college and desirable in every respect, yet unable 
to enter on account of lack of means after every effort to secure funds 
has been made, is advised to let the case be known to the Administra- 
tion of the College, since It Is often possible to make some suggestion 
which proves to be of advantage. 

A co-operative house is open to self-helping students but is not of 
sufficient capacity to provide for freshman applicants as well. A system 
of student waitresses is also in operation, and freshmen can often avail 
themselves of the opportunity of self-help thus afforded. A descriptive 
circular will be mailed on application. 

The Christian Association of the College is actively engaged in bringing 
students into connection with work to be done for compensation within 
the College and in the neighborhood, but such employment, since It 
makes a distinct draft upon strength and time, Is hardly to be advised 
for the freshman year. 

Another source of pecuniary aid is in the work of the Students' Aid 
Society established by the founders of Wellesley and revived and Incor- 
porated by the alumnae of the College in April, 1916. The Wellesley 
College Loan Fund, established in 1908 through contributions from 
alumnae and other friends of the College, Is Included in the resources 
of the Students' Aid Society. Small amounts are loaned to students 
without interest in expectation that these students will repay as soon as 
they are able. Assistance is often given partly In gifts and partly in 
loans. The existing funds are not sufficient to meet the wants of deserv- 
ing applicants, and contributions of any amount will be gladly received 
by the treasurer. Miss Mary Caswell, Wellesley College. 



Equipment 135 

EQUIPMENT 

Founders Hall, a building for lecture rooms and department offices 
pertaining to instruction in the Liberal Arts, was opened for use in 
September, 1919. The hall was built from the Restoration Fund, secured 
for the College through trustees, faculty, alumnae, and other friends, and 
replaces in some part College Hall, the first and main building of the 
College, destroyed by fire, March 17, 1914. The building is dedicated 
as a memorial to the Founders of the College, Henry Fowle Durant and 
his wife, Pauline Adeline Durant. 

Founders Hall is the first achieved member of a group of academic 
buildings designed by Messrs. Day and Klauder of Philadelphia and to 
be completed as soon as funds allow. 

The Library of the College, endowed by Eben Norton Horsford, now 
numbers over 100,000 bound volumes, including the departmental libraries. 
The books in the General Library building form a collection chosen pri- 
marily for the use of students and instructors in the college courses In 
Literature and Languages, History, Economics, Sociology, Philosophy, 
Education, Religious History and certain of the sciences. The General 
Library is open on week days from 8:10 A.M. to 9:30 P.M., and on 
Sundays from 2:30 to 5:30 P.M. Students have direct access to the 
shelves. The Library is catalogued by author and subject entries, and 
the most recent and useful bibliographical aids are provided; special 
effort Is made to train students In methods of research. 

The Library subscribes for about three hundred and eighty American 
and foreign periodicals, including daily newspapers representing different 
sections of the United States besides representative British and Conti- 
nental dailies. 

The Library has also many special collections of great interest and 
value to the student doing graduate or other research work. Among the 
most valuable of these are the Plimpton Collection established by Mr. 
George A. Plimpton in memory of his wife, Frances Pearsons Plimpton, 
of the class of 1884, which comprises 953 volumes of Italian books and 
manuscripts chiefly of the Renaissance; the Ruskin Collection, the gift 
of Mr. Charles E. Goodspeed, and the Collection of Early and Rare 
Editions of English Poetry given for the most part by Professor George 
Herbert Palmer. 

The Brooks Memorial Room, opened in 1921, provides comfortable 
and beautiful surroundings with carefully selected books for leisure 
hours of reading. 

The following collections are placed in the buildings of the respective 
departments: 

Art Library 3085 vols. Astronomy Library . . . 1297 vols. 

Botany Library 1265 " Chemistry Library 941 " 

Hygiene Library 3078 " Music Library 1442 " 



136 Equipment 

Farnsworth Art Building and Art Collections.— The Faraswortli Art 
Building, the gift of the late Isaac D. Farnsworth, was opened In 
September, 1889. Besides lecture rooms, galleries for collections, and 
studios for drawing and painting, a special feature Is the arrangement 
of laboratories and libraries, so that the books and art material relating 
to particular subjects and periods can be made Immediately available 
to general students. 

The Art Collection consists of a large number of photographs and 
other material. Including the James Jackson Jarves collection of laces 
and vestments; the M. Day Kimball Memorial, consisting of original pieces 
of antique sculpture; a few examples of early Italian painting, Including 
an early Slenese painting, the gift of Mrs. William H. Hill; a collection 
of Indian baskets, the gift of Mrs. Rufus S. Frost; various Egyptian 
antiquities obtained through the kindness of the late Mrs. John C. 
Whitin, Including certain interesting papyri; and scarabs and seals from 
the collection of Dr. Chauncey Murch, the gift of Mrs. Helen M. Gould 
Shepard; two Renaissance sculptured columns, the gift of Mr. William 
C. Safford; the Stetson collection of modern paintings, and a few other 
examples. A movement has been started to develop the museum collec- 
tions further, and to make the museum Into a center of beauty for the 
College. 

The collection of photographs and other reproductions numbers over 
sixteen thousand. 

Mnsic Hall and Billings Hall are large brick buildings, devoted to the 
department of Music. Music Hall contains offices, studios, and practice 
rooms equipped with thirty-seven new pianos of standard makes, a 
victrola and three player-pianos; also a large room, containing a two- 
manual pipe organ for the use of the organ pupils. Billings Hall, opened 
in 1904, contains the office of the Professor of Music, the library and 
class rooms for instruction in Musical Theory; also a concert room, seating 
four hundred and ten people, and containing the Grover organ, — a large 
three-manual organ, rebuilt and modernized. 

The Music Library Includes a collection of manuscripts, about two 
hundred scores (Symphony, Opera, Oratorio, and Cantata), two hundred 
songs, three hundred piano arrangements (two, four, and eight hands), 
besides seven hundred and fifty reference books on musical subjects. 
The department owns one hundred records for the victrola and three 
hundred records for the player-pianos. 

Laboratories and Scientific Collections 

Astronomy. — The WhItIn Observatory Is a one-story building of brick, 
faced with white marble, situated on a small hill on the college grounds, 
and devoted entirely to the use of the department of Astronomy. It con- 
tains two rooms surmounted by rotating domes, twenty-five feet and twelve 



Equipment 137 

and one-half feet in diameter respectively; two transit rooms; a spec- 
troscopic laboratory; a large, well-lighted room for elementary laboratory 
work; and another large room in which is kept the department library. In 
the larger dome room is mounted a twelve-inch Clark equatorial refracting 
telescope, which is provided with a filar micrometer, a polarizing photo- 
meter, and a six-prism spectroscope. The twenty-five foot dome is 
rotated by an electric motor. The smaller dome contains a six-inch Clark 
equatorial refractor. There are two transit instruments, the larger a 
Bamberg prismatic transit of three inches aperture. A four-inch tele- 
scope with objective by Browning is mounted in a south wall of the build- 
ing, with the eye end inside and the optic axis parallel to the axis of 
the Earth; a plane mirror beneath the object-glass reflects into the 
latter the light of the object observed. In the spectroscopic laboratory 
is a Rowland concave grating spectroscope of six feet focal length. The 
Observatory is supplied with two Howard sidereal clocks, a Bond mean- 
time chronometer, and two chronographs, any of which may be connected 
electrically through a switchboard with keys near the various telescopes; 
a Berger surveyor's transit; an Evershed protuberance spectroscope; a 
Gaertner comparator for measuring spectrograms; a projecting lantern 
and about 700 astronomical lantern slides; and a large collection of illus- 
trative apparatus and photographs. 

The Observatory House, the residence of the Observatory staff, is 
near by. Both the Observatory and the house, and also the greater part 
of the astronomical equipment, are the gift of the late Mrs. John C. 
Whitln. 

Botany.— The department of Botany has well-equipped laboratories 
and a range of modern greenhouses. 

The Illustrative collections comprise an herbarium of some sixty 
thousand sheets, including the lichen collection of the late Professor Clara 
E. Cummings; also a collection of woods, fruits, and economic vegetable 
products; three hundred ninety-three charts by Henslow, Kny, Dodel, 
Tschirch, and others, including a number made by members of the 
department staff; a collection of about one hundred Auzoux and other 
botanical models; Brendel's glass models of cryptogams; seventeen 
hundred water color paintings of North American plants by Helen Frances 
Ay res; a large collection of lantern slides and microscopic mounts; and 
about five thousand museum specimens. The department has an "Out- 
door Laboratory" for the use of certain courses. The greenhouses con- 
tribute to all the courses in the department, but are of especial importance 
in connection with the work in landscape gardening, physiology, ecology, 
taxonomy and genetics. The native flora about Wellesley is easily 
accessible, furnishing a convenient field for both the taxonomlst and 
ecologlst. The library Is well supplied with reference works and with 
current periodicals. 



138 Equipment 

Chemistry*— The department of Chemistry occupies a separate build- 
ing, which contains two lecture rooms and the chemical library, in 
addition to the rooms fitted up for laboratory work. Separate labor- 
atories are provided for work in general chemistry, organic chemistry, 
qualitative and quantitative analysis, and food analysis. The building 
is conveniently arranged and well equipped with necessary apparatus and 
appliances. 

Geology and Geography. — The department of Geology and Geography 
has a large and well-equipped lecture hall provided with a Leitz epidia- 
scope for lantern slide and opaque projection, a good sized class room, 
and two laboratories, one for the use of geography classes, the other 
for work in geology. 

The Geology Museum contains a typical college collection of dynamical, 
structural, and historical geology specimens, — a systematic collection of 
minerals arranged according to Dana, and a systematic collection of 
rocks. There are three collections arranged for class-room use, — one 
each in mineralogy, petrology and structural and historical geology. 
These collections are all the generous gifts of colleges, museums, and 
friends. The department has two noteworthy collections. The first 
is the Horace I. Johnson Mineral Collection, which consists of five 
thousand valuable and beautiful mineral specimens, including many 
precious metals and stones. This collection is the gift of the late Mr. 
John Merton, and was presented through the Class of 1915 by the 
courtesy of Miss M. Helen Merton. The second is the Reverend David 
F. Pierce Collection, which includes a complete and rare collection of 
building and ornamental stones and many precious and semi-precious 
minerals. This collection is the gift of Professor Frederick E. Pierce of 
Yale, Miss Anna H. Pierce, and Miss Mary E. Pierce of the Class of 1898. 
The maps of the department include wall maps of different countries and 
sections of countries; all the United States Geologic Folios, and ten 
thousand topographic maps of the United States Geologic Survey. Five 
thousand of these latter maps are arranged in groups to illustrate 
geographic types. The department has four thousand lantern slides which 
illustrate all phases of geology and geography. 

Hygiene and Physical Education.— The Department of Hygiene and 
Physical Education occupies Mary Hemenway Hall on the western border 
of the college grounds. It is designed to meet the requirements of the 
course for the training of teachers, and to provide practical instruction 
for the entire College. The equipment includes large, well-lighted 
gymnasiums with ample bathing facilities, administrative offices, class 
rooms, and laboratories for anatomy, physiology, bacteriology, hygiene, 
anthropometry, corrective exercise, and research. The department 
library contains 3300 volumes, a collection of valuable pamphlets, and 
regularly receives twenty-nine journals dealing with matters related to 



Equipment 139 

hygiene. Immediately adjoining Mary Hemenway Hall are tennis and 
archery courts, basket ball, baseball, volley ball, and hockey fields, with 
room for further expansion. Lake Waban furnishes facilities for rowing, 
swimming and skating. There is a golf course with a clubhouse. 
The equipment of the department is designed for the application of 
modern science to the maintenance and promotion of health and for 
education through motor activity. 

Mathematics. — The unusually large and fine collection of Mathematical 
Models, destroyed by fire in March, 1914, has at last been replaced by 
a smaller but very useful set of Brill-Schilling models of surfaces of the 
second, third and fourth orders, executed chiefly in thread, in celluloid, 
and in plaster. 

Physics. — The department of Physics occupies temporary quarters 
consisting of two conveniently arranged lecture rooms, fitted with direct 
and alternating current and gas, and laboratories for general physics, 
electricity, heat, and light. The equipment is thoroughly modern. The 
lecture apparatus is sufficient to permit a wide range of experimental 
lectures. In the elementary laboratory duplication of apparatus permits 
a close co-ordination between lectures and laboratory exercises. The 
equipment for advanced laboratory work is especially strong in electrical, 
optical, and acoustical apparatus. It includes an unusual equipment for 
experiments In electromagnetic waves and radio communication. 

Psychology. — The temporary Psychology Laboratory contains ten 
rooms, including a dark room. The equipment is adequate for demon- 
stration, for general experimental work, and for many lines of research. 

Zoology. — The department of Zoology is housed in a temporary build- 
ing. Ihis building contains laboratories for the elementary course in 
zoology, for histology and embryology and for physiology. The courses 
in anatomy are conducted in the laboratories in Mary Hemen- 
way Hall. The equipment lost in the fire of March, 1914, is being 
replaced as rapidly as conditions permit. The fundamental needs of the 
various courses have been met, and the physiology laboratory in the new 
wing is fully equipped with modern apparatus. The nucleus of a new 
museum has been formed, and additions are being made as fast as funds 
and the lack of adequate fire-proof space allow. A collection of New 
England birds, and a valuable collection of shells, the gift of Mrs. Rebecca 
S. Beaman, of Cambridge, are housed in a basement room of the Library. 



FORMS OF BEQUEST 



I give and bequeath to Wellesley College, a corporation established by 
law, in the toiun of Wellesley, county of Norfolk, and Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts, the sum of dollars, to be safely invested by 

it, and called the Endowment Fund. The interest shall be 

applied to the payment of the salaries of teachers in Wellesley College, 
as the Trustees shall deem expedient. 



1 give and bequeath to Wellesley College, a corporation established by 
law, in the town of Wellesley, county of Norfolk, and Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts, the sum of dollars, to be appropriated by the 

Trustees for the benefit of the College in such manner as they shall think 
will be most useful. 



I give and bequeath to Wellesley College, a corporation established by 
law, in the town of Wellesley, county of Norfolk, and Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts, the sum of dollars, to be safely invested by 

it, and called the Scholarship Fund. The interest of this 

fund shall be applied to aid deserving students in Wellesley College. 



DEGREES CONFERRED IN 1924 

MASTER OF ARTS 

Margaret Charlotte Amig (B.A., Goucher College, 1919), Philosophy. 
Helen Virginia Broe (B.A., Wellesley College, 1918), Greek and Classical 

Archaeology. 
Helen Irma Davis (B.A., University of Michigan, 1919), English Literaturt. 
Vera Carrie Hemenway (B.A., Wellesley College, 1919), Education. 
Marian March Johnson (B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1921), Hygiene and 

Physical Education. 
Selena Blanche Lindsay (B.A., Mount Holyoke College, 1921), Zoology and 

Physiology. 
Beulah Luise Friedericke Meier (B.A., University of Nebraska, 1923), 

Psychology and Philosophy. 
Laurine Elizabeth Musser (B.A., Beloit College, 1923), English Literature. 
Emily Gladys Peterson (B.A., Wellesley College, 1920), Education and 

Latin. 
Myra Esther Shimberg (B.A., Wellesley College, 1922), Psychology and 

Philosophy. 
Eleanor May Sinclair (B.A., DePauw University, 1923), English Literature. 
Elizabeth Tilley (B.A., DePauw University, 1921), English Literature. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Huldah Elizabeth Acly 
Dorothy Evelyn Adams 
Katherine Augusta Adams 
Irene Viola Adler 
Charlotte Louise Allen 
Gladys Burton Allen 
Harriet Whitney Allen 
Frieda Altman 
Bernice Kathryn Anderson 
Florence Charlotte Eleanor 

Anderson 
Mary Genevieve Arnold 
Sarah Aronoff 
Josephine Stern Ascher 
Helen Josephine Atkinson 
Elizabeth Avery 
Elizabeth Carter Babbitt 
Barbara Bagg 
Edythe Grace Balsley 
Katharine Barney 
Margaret Barry 
Martha Leeds Bartlett 
Cornelia Allene Beall 
Helen Kitfield Beaton 
Dorothy Bradley Bell 
Phebe Skidmore Bergen 
Helen Louise Bidwell 
Helen Biggs 
Elizabeth Stahl Black 
Doris Chapman Blaisdell 
Emily Louise Blanchard 
Adelaide Loeb Blum 
Augusta Wilson Boal 
Elizabeth Fiske Boggess 
Katharine Bosley 
Esther Brewer 



Elh^nor Brown 

Katharine Moller Brown 

Sarah Jeannette Brown 

Helen Julia Bruch 

Mary Louise Brush 

Elizabeth Charlotte Buethe 

Ruth Bunker 

Margaret Burr 

Helen Eldredge Busser 

Anne Davenport Caldwell 

Edna May Campbell 

Margaret May Campbell 

Helen Keightley Carley 

Mary Lucile Carpenter 

Mary-Lee Carroll 

Eleanor Katherine Carter 

Mary Chandler 

Harrietts Frances Charles 

Alice Lincoln Chestnut 

Louise Avery Child 

Martha Saxton Clapp 

Gladys Evelyn Clark 

Gertrude Glines Clift 

Mildred Brown Codding 

Mary Dutton Colby 

Helen Mary Collins 

Leota Carolene Colpitts 

Jane Hunter Colwell 

Agnes Elizabeth Conwell 

Elizabeth Madeline Cooper 

Mary Eliza Portsmouth Crawford 

Hilda Chaffee Crosby 

Katherine Cunningham 

Laliah Florence Curry 

Irmgart Elizabeth vanDaeli, 

Doris Elizabeth Dalton 



142 



Degrees Conferred 



Florence Danzis 

Anna Parker Davidson 

Nancy Content Davidson 

Dorothy Davis 

Elizabeth Alice Dean 

Dorothy Leland Dewing 

Marion May Dilts 

Louise Dixon 

yuki domoto 

Mildred Merritt Donnelly 

Katharine Dorrance 

Jean Douglass 

Laura Drown 

Leona Durkes 

EvALiNE Louise Durst 

Ruth Earp 

Helen Laurette Eastman 

Frances Easton 

Marion Joan Eddy 

Louise Hatheway Edwards 

Della Louise Eisele 

WiLMA ElSEMAN 

Mary Estelle Ellinwood 

Harriet Ellis 

Ruth Humphrey Ellis 

Eleanor Webster Ellsworth 

Hellen Louise Emmons 

Virginia English 

Gladys Lois Epstein 

Constance Antoinette Everett 

Miriam Rogers Ewart 

Margareta Agata Faissler 

May Louise Fales 

Jasper Virginia Farabough 

Bethann Beall Faris 

Lois Budington Farmer 

Ruth McFarlane Felton 

Katharine Hine Fenning 

Eleanore Louise Fisher 

Gladys Louise Fisher 

Harriet Rittenhouse Fisher 

Lucy Howe Fisher 

Gwendolen Flagg 

Joan Fleming 

Frances Elisabeth Foley 

Dorothy Preston Ford 

May deforest 
Mary Weaver Fox 

Mary Louise Frackelton 
Elizabeth Eraser 

Agnes Dinah Friedman 
Frances Dessez Furlong 
Joyce Lee Ganzel 
Helen Louise Gaylord 
Emma Roberta Gehring 
Marian Boyd Gilchrist 
Margaret Adlum Gist 
Eleanor Weeks Gleichauf 
Bertha Doris Goodman 
Alice Gordon 
Dorothy Harvey Goudey 
Delnoce Elaine Grant 
Lydia Green 
Elizabeth Grier 
Carolyn Rutter Grimes 
Anna Paxson Gullette 
Corinthia Annis Hall 
Lilian Hall 
Mary Alice Hancock 



Clara Thomson Handy 

JuvANTA Harper 

Clara Violet Hayward 

Martha Hazell 

Dorothy Bernard Heaphy 

Ruth Ann Heller 

Charlotte Helm rath 

Ruth Higbee 

NoRNA Valborg Hoagland 

Wilhelmina Thompson Hoagland 

Natalie Helena Hodgdon 

Margaret Kendall Holbrook 

Helen Frances Holmes 

Marion Horton 

Marian Elizabeth Hulbert 

Catherine Humphrey Hurd 

Ysabel Hutchinson 

Lucinda Martin Iliff 

Mary Elizabeth Jackson 

Phoebe Gertrude Jackson 

Elizabeth Sands Johnson 

Jeannette Johnson 

Margaret Adelaide Johnson 

Ruth Anna Johnson 

Anne Mary Jones 

Alice C Joseph 

Claire Lang Karpeles 

Louise Keener 

Ruth Coe Kessler 

Elizabeth Freeman Kirkham 

Katharine Winthrop Knaebel 

Elizabeth Saint Knowles 

Cynthia Maria Lamb 

Mary Emma Lamb 
Pauline Leonard Lane 

Doris Towne Langdon 
Muriel Lee 

Mary Elizabeth Lehman 
Alice Elisabeth Leinbach 

Virginia Marie Leussler 

Alice Friedman Levy 

Dorothy Gertrude Lewis 

Lois Olivia Linhart 

Sarah Winn Lipscomb 

Alice Fay Lister 

Eleanor Straus Loeb 

ZUNG-NYI LoH 

Mary Elizabeth Long 

Elisabeth Middleton Luce 

Clara Lukens 

Jean Doolittle Lyon 

Sylvia Stern Lyon 

Mary Ruth McCarthy 

Carroll McCarty 

Eda Gregg McCoy 

Mary Fielder McFarland 

Adelaide Edith McIntosh 

Frances Templeman McIntyre 

Constance Woodworth McKinney 

Catherine Jane Mackintosh 

Helen Colette McNamara 

MoLLiE Wadsworth Madden 

Louise Elizabeth Maltby 

Mildred Gilbert Marcus 

Nanette Hammel Marks 

Frances Marshall 

Lillian Marson Marshall 

Mary Martin 

Carol Young Mason 



Degrees Conferred 



143 



Marian Chandler Mathewson 

Gladys Dorothea Mayer 

Olive Dana Mayo 

Helen Elizabeth Megahan 

Florence Elizabeth Meier 

Kathleen Ernesta Meritt 

Kathryn Mial 

Gary Blunt Millholland 

Alice Elizabeth Mills 

Margaret Brockenborough Mitchell 

Mena Hutzler Mitteldorfer 

Grace Williams Moffat 

Katherine Louise Moffat 

Margaret Montgomery 

Elabel Vivien Moore 

Margaret Hallett Morse 

Margaret Ruth Myers 

Marie Naber 

Margaret Worthing Nelson 

Margaret Stewart Nichols 

Ruth Rowland Nichols 

Elsa Corrine Elizabeth Nord 

Natalie Elizabeth Norris 

Cornelia Bulford North 

Helen Pilsbury Noyes 

Margaret Noyes 

Ethel Mildred O'Brien 

Edith Osborn 

Helen Osborn 

Ellen Strong Page 

Elizabeth Paige 

Margaret Paine 

Mildred Josephine Parker 

Harriet Trumbull Parsons 

Elizabeth Paschal 

Frances Loraine Patton 

Caroline Nairn Paul 

Jane Wright Peck 

Eloise Mary Peckham 

Edith Burnham Perkins 

Margaret Stuart Perkins 

Polly Perkins 

Louise May Peters 

Mary-Catherine Phillips 

Ruth Louise Phillips 

Katharine Pike 

Nesta Piper 

Josephine Platner 

Mary Elisabeth Pohlson 

ELatharine McIntosh Pomeroy 

Helen Fleming Poole 

Priscilla Presby 

Marian Allen Price 

Frances Victoria Rafferty 

Catherine Florence Raiguel 

Katharine Rand 

Louise Weiler Rauh 

Muriel Anna Reiss 

Marie Katherine Remien 

Dorothy Marion Renninger 

Millicent Barton Rex 

Virginia Henrietta Hallett 

Reynolds 
Ruth Alexander Richardson 
Anna Myfanwy Roberts 
Carolyn Adah Robinson 
Lelia Eleanor Rosebrugh 
Jean Perry Ross 
Laura Helen Rxjback 



Marion Douglas Russell 
Louise Sanders 
Cora Gertrude Sanford 
Lucille Douglas Savage 
Francesca Elena Savini 
Emily Josephine Saylor 
Rosalie Claire Schachner 
Beatrice Christine Schaefer 
Joy Scheidenhelm 
Marian Julia Schmaltz 
Dorothea Schmedtgen 
Blanche Harryette Schnitzer 
Alva Bennett Scott 
Janet Seeman 
Mildred Frances Sheehan 
Louisa Rossiter Shotwell 
Ella Trew Simpers 
Ruth Bixby Sinclair 
Edith Virginia Sipfle 
Hazel Maude Skelhorne 
Helen Elizabeth Smart 
Pearl Beatrice Smart 
Anna Mary Smith 
Dorothy Elizabeth Smith 
Jean Tarbell Smith 
Marion Lansing Speer 
WiLDA Robins Speer 
Mary Jane Spencer 
Lillian Edna Starr 
Margaret Morris Stewart 
Catharine Potter Stinson 
Susanne Stoddard 
Isabel Bremner Sutherland 
Lois Dorothea Svendsen 
Grace Jessamine Sykes 
Allene Roxann Talmey 
Ruth Hahne Tegtmeyer 
Grace Louise Thayer 
Margaret Thayer 
Helen Frances Thomas 
Florence Bell Thompson 
Mary Hall Thompson 
Sara Woolley Thompson 
Pauline Janette Tobias 
Constance Miriam Towner 
Helen Townsend 
Nita Armour Treble 
Eleanor Adams Trefethen 
Hazel May Turley 
J^ois Twiggar 

Helen Simpson Van Alstyne 
Virginia Broughton Vary 
Helen Marion Vaughan 
Augusta Bertha Wagner 
Louise Amelia Walder 
Margaret Bai Walton 
Emelyn Waltz 
Cora Adelaide Ward 
Helen Elizabeth Ware 
Naomi Eleanore Warne 
Mary Ecroyd Warner 
Gretchen Muriel Waterman 
Emily Cornelia Wayland-Smith 
Nancy Shaw Weaver 
Elizabeth Weisser 
Irene Elizabeth Welch 
Elizabeth Wells 
Mary Elizabeth West 
Elizabeth Winslow Wetherbee 



144 



Honors in Subjects 



Katharine Whitten 

Jean Evelyn Wilder 

Marion Grace Williams 

Helen McCreary Willyoung 

Helen Wilson 

Elvene Amelia Winkleman 

Helen Diana Miller Wolf 



Helen Louise Woelfel 
Annette Newhall Wright 
Mary Marjorie Wright 
Harriet Yarrow 
Ada Helene Young 
Grace Vung-tsieu Zia 



CERTIFICATES IN HYGIENE AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

AWARDED IN 1924 



Elizabeth Abbott, 

B.A., Wellesley College 
Winifred Isabel Bailey, 

B.A., University of Minnesota 
Frances Elizabeth Baker, 

B.A., University of Oregon 
Mary-Ethel Ball, 

B.A., University of Colorado 
Sarah Bishop, 

B.A., Wellesley College 
Elizabeth Gardner Chase, 

B.A., Wheaton College 
Frances Helen Dillon, 

B.A., College of Wooster 
Julia Rebecca Grout, 

B.A., Mount Holyoke College 
Elizabeth Hunter Hastie, 

B.A., Wellesley College 



Margaret Lucille Kemp, 

B.A., University of California 
Florence Geikler McAfee, 

B.A., Pennsylvania State College 
Miriam Rittenhouse Mayne, 

B.A., Wellesley College 
Louise Wheeler Pulver, 

B.A., Wellesley College 
Harriet Post Raw^les, 

B.A., Indiana University 
Bessie Huntting Rudd, 

B.A., Radcliffe College 
Elizabeth Laugher Stockbridge, 

B.A., Wellesley College 
Edna Willis, 

B.A., Wellesley College 
Theodate Pope Wilson, 

B.A., WeUesley College 



HONORS IN SUBJECTS 

Harriet Whitney Allen 

Physical Chemistry: Hydrogenion Concentration of certain 

Pectin Solutions 

Eleanor Brown 
Soclologic and Economic Aspects of Women in Industry 

Elizabeth Paschal 

The Family and the Status of Women in the Social History and in the 
Literature of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries 

Katharine McIntosh Pomeroy 

Physics and Mathematics: The Power Loss in Condensers with 

Glass Dielectrics 

Katharine Rand 
Chemistry and Zoology: Preparation of Pure Pectin from Citrus Fruits 

Lillian Edna Starr 
Latin Literature, with especial Emphasis on Petronius and Apuleius 

Mary Hall Thompson 
History and Economics: Factors Affecting the Price of Sugar, 1890-1912 



HONOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

Honor Scholarships (without stipend) have been established by the 
College for the purpose of giving recognition to a high degree of excel- 
lence in academic work. These honors fall into two classes: students 
in the first, or higher class, are termed Durant Scholars; students in 
the second class are termed Wellesley College Scholars. 

These honors are awarded to seniors on the basis of two and one-half 
years' work, to juniors on the basis of one and one-half years' work. 
The standard In each case is absolute, not competitive. 



DURANT SCHOLARS 

Appointed in 1924 



HuLDAH Elizabeth Acly, '24 
Harriet Whitney Allen, '24 
Frieda Altman, '24 
Elizabeth Avery, '24 
Emily Louise Blanchard, '24 
Chaille Margaret Cage, '25 
Anne Davenport Caldwell, '24 
Ines Virginia Catron, '25 
Mildred Brown Codding, '24 
Elizabeth Madeline Cooper, '24 
Ida Sonntag Craven, '25 
Katherine Cunningham, '24 
Rose Dorothy David, '25 
Helen Laurette Eastman, '24 
Bethann Beall Faris, '24 
Virginia Clay Hamilton, '25 
Mary Elizabeth Jackson, '24 
Louise Keener, '24 
Dorothy Knight, '25 
Katherine Hill Knight, '25 
Chi Liang Kwei, '25 
Virginia Marie Leussler, '24 
Carroll McCarty, '24 
Helen Emily Mahley, '25 
Evelyn Brower Man, '25 
Margaret Laramy Meaker, '25 



Ruth Vernum Memory, '25 
Margaret Worthing Nelson, '24 
Elizabeth Paschal, '24 
Eloise Mary Peckham, '24 
Katharine McIntosh Pomeroy, '24 
Priscilla Presbrey, '24 
Millicent Barton Rex, '24 
Evelyn Carol Roat, '25 
Janet Robinson, '25 
Marion Douglas Russell, '24 
Joy Scheidenhelm, '24 
Dorothea Schmedtgen, '24 
Alva Bennett Scott, '24 
Mildred Frances Sheehan, '24 
Lillian Edna Starr, '24 
Helen Frances Thomas, '24 
Augusta Bertha Wagner, '24 
Helen Elizabeth Ware, '24 
Naomi Eleanore Warne, '24 
Mary Elizabeth West, '24 
Helen McCreary Willyoung, '24 
Elvene Amelia Winkleman, '24 
Alice Elizabeth Kingsbury Wood, '25 
Margaret Perscilla Wright, '25 
Winifred Wright, '25 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE SCHOLARS 

Appointed in 1924 



Doris Alexander, '25 

Mary Winslow Allen, '25 

Bernice Kathryn Anderson, ^'24 

Josephine Stern Ascher, *24 

Barbara Bagg, '24 

Helen Kitfield Beaton, '24 

Elizabeth Fiske Boggess, *24 

Eleanor Brown, '24 

Sarah Conger Buchan, '25 

Elizabeth Charlotte Buethe, 24 

Sarah Carr, '25 

Alice Lincoln Chestnut, '24 

Louise Avery Child, '24 

Florence Louise Codman, '25 



Mildred Cohen, '25 
Elizabeth Joyce Cratsley, 25 
Laliah Florence Curry, '24 
Elizabeth Alice Dean, '24 
Hermina Helena Dick, '25 
Marion May Dilts, '24 
Louise Dixon, '24 
Edna Ella Duge, '25 
Ruth Earp, '24 
Flo ma Edge, '25 
Harriet Edgell, '25 
Frances Loretta Edwards, 25 
Della Louise Eisele, '24 
Mary Estelle Ellin wood, '24 



146 



Honor Scholarships 



Margarjeta Agata Faissler, '24 
Margaret Epes Fincke, '25 
Helen Seaward Forknall, '25 
Elizabeth Fraser, '24 
Victoria Elizabeth Freeman, '25 
Grace Marian Frick, '25 
Marion Emeline Greene, '25 
Anna Paxson Gullette, '24 
Corinthia Annis Hall, '24 
Katherine Welsh Harbison, '25 
Martha Hazell, '24 
Virginia Hartwell Hearding, '25 
Janice Babet Hellman, '25 
Ruth Higbee, '24 
Helen Frances Holmes, '24 
Evelyn Harriet Hougen, '25 
YsABEL Hutchinson, '24 
Dorothy Frizell Hyde, '25 
Helen Fay Jackson, '25 
Phoebe Gertrude Jackson, '24 
Julia Williams James, '25 
Ruth Elizabeth Jeffrey, '25 
Elizabeth Sands Johnson, '24 
Jeannette Johnson, '24 
Gwendolen Schlaegel Jones, '25 
Martha Catherine Jones, '25 
Ruth Weston Kent, '25 
Winifred Janette Kittredge, '25 
Marion Judith Klein, '25 
Katharine Winthrop Knaebel, '24 
Mary Elizabeth Lehman, '24 
LiLiTH Carolyn Lidseen, '25 
Alice Fay Lister ,'24 
Ruth Dudley Lovejoy, '25 
Elisabeth Middleton Luce, '24 
Eleanor Ludington, '25 
Clara Lukens, '24 
Mildred Gilbert Marcus, '24 
Hilda Hayes Marcy, '25 
Flora Eleanor Marsh, '25 
Lillian Marson Marshall, *24 
Marian Chandler Mathewson, '24 



Olive Dana Mayo, '24 
Elizabeth Miles, 25 
Marion Montgomery, '25 
Helen Pillsbury Noyes, '24 
Alice Harriet Parsons, '25 
Harriet Agnes Patterson, '25 
Carol Parker Perrin, '25 
Marion Leslie Pitcher, '25 
Josephine Platner, '24 
Katharine Rand, '24 
Louise Weiler Rauh, '24 
Dorothy Marion Renninger, '24 
Priscilla Allan Robinson, '25 
Frances Edgar Rosenthal, '25 
Rosalie Claire Schachner, '24 
Mary Louise Scheidenhelm, '25 
Blanche Harryette Schnitzer, '24 
Janet Scott, '25 
Helen Cranston Secrist, '25 
Emily Louise Seiter, '25 
Helen Shearman, '25 
Louisa Rossiter Shotwell, '24 
Ella Trew Simpers, '24 
Pearl Beatrice Smart, '24 
Mildred Smith, '25 
Alma Cochran Sprecher, '25 
Margery Simonds Steele, '25 
Helen Stilson, '25 
Eleanore Taulane, '25 
Ruth Hahne Tegtmeyer, '24 
Elizabeth Lodor Teter, '25 
Florence Bell Thompson, '24 
Sara Woolley Thompson, '24 
Constance Miriam Towner, '24 
Helen Marion Vaughan, '24 
Mary Ecroyd Warner, '24 
Elizabeth Boyd Watson, '25 
Emily Cornelia Wayland-Smith, '24 
Elizabeth Wells, '24 
Marion Grace Williams, '24 
Helen Cecilia Willis, '25 
Ada Helene Young, '24 



SUMMARY OF STUDENTS 



Resident candidates for the M.A. degree 43 

Resident candidates for the Certificate of Hygiene . . 33 

Candidates for the B.A. degree: — 

Seniors 335 

Juniors 362 

Sophomores 370 

Freshmen 413 

Unclassified 22 

— 1,502 

Non-candidates for degrees 5 

Total registration, November, 1924 1,583 

United States: — New Jersey . . . 144 

Alabama .... 9 New York ... 321 

Arizona .... 2 North Carolina . . 3 

Arkansas .... 5 Ohio 93 

California . . . 11 Oklahoma ' . . . 3 

Colorado .... 10 Oregon .... ■ 

Connecticut ... 65 Pennsylvania . . . 168 

Delaware ... 9 Porto Rico ... 1 

District of Columbia . 16 Rhode Island ... 29 

Florida . . . . . 2 South Carolina . . 2 

Georgia .... 6 Tennessee . . . 17 

Hawaii .... 3 Texas .... 17 

Idaho .... 1 Vermont .... 17 

Illinois .... 69 Virginia .... 11 

Indiana . . . . 22 Washington ... 6 

Iowa .... 16 West Virginia ... 8 

Kansas .... 7 Wisconsin ... 11 
Kentucky ... 19 Other Countries: — 

Louisiana ... 5 Canada .... 4 

Maine .... 26 China .... 7 

Maryland ... 10 Czecho-Slovakia . . 1 

Massachusetts . . 294 Germany .... 1 

Michigan ... 28 Greece .... 1 

Minnesota ... 12 India .... 2 

Missouri .... 21 Ireland .... 1 

Montana .... 1 Japan .... 4 

Nebraska ... 8 Mexico .... 1 

New Hampshire . . 23 Turkey .... 2 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

1924 - 1925 

Mrs. Louise Pope Johnson (Mrs. H. H.), President , , „ , ^, , , /^ 

2171 Overlook Rd., Cleveland, O. 

Miss Lucy Caroline Barkwill, 1st Vice-President ,,,>-. 

2688 Fairmount Blvd., Cleveland, O. 

Miss Bessie Sargeant Smith, 2nd Vice-President „, , , r^ 

Public Library, Cleveland, O. 

Mrs. Katharine Bingham Fisher (Mrs. J. C), Corresponding Secretary 

11308 Hessler Rd., Cleveland, O. 

Miss Louise Prouty, Treasurer Public Library, Cleveland, O. 

Miss Laura M. Dwight, Alumnae Executive Secretary Wellesley, Mass. 

LOCAL ASSOCIATIONS 

In the following:, an arrangement by states has been adopted. The name 
standing after that of the club refers to the secretary iinless otherwise specified. 
In the address of this officer, the name of the city (or town) and state are 
omitted if these have already been expressly stated in the heading. Corrections 
or additions will be gratefully received. 

California. 

Central, Charlotte S. Evans, Pres., 2847 Garber St.. Berkeley. 
Southern, Silence McVay Reynolds (Mrs. H. W.), 4630 West l7th St., 
Los Angeles. 

Canada 

Montreal, Alice Norcross Gross (Mrs. H. J.), 149 Drummond St. 

China. 

Elsie Sites Raven (Mrs. Franklin), c/o Raven Trust Co., 15 Nanking Rd., 
Shanghai. 

Colorado. 

State, Elsbeth Rattle, Pres., 909 St. Paul St., Denver. 

Columbia, District of. 

Ruth Weeks, 3461 Lowell St., Washington. 

Connecticut. 

Bridgeport, Elizabeth McDowell Bennett (Mrs. H. C), 18 Robson PL, 

Fairfield. 
Hartford, Gretchen B. Harper, 17 South Marshall St. 
New Haven, Alice Dimick, 209 Church St. 
Waterbury, Helen Coe Boardman (Mrs. Allen H.), 452 Willow St. 

Georgia, 

Atlanta, Angela Palomo Campbell (Mrs. J. E.), 225 East 4th St. 

Hawaii. 

Alberta Moore Reed (Mrs. E. J.), Box 468, Honolulu. 

Illinois. 

Chicago, Ruth Carothers Fleming (Mrs. J. P.), 787 Foxdale Ave., Winnetka. 

Indiana. 

Agnes Ketcham Dorsey (Mrs. R. L.), 4466 Guilford Ave., Indianapolis. 

lOWA. 

Iowa, Ruth Hoyt Williams (Mrs. Gowan C), 1308 Mondamin Ave., Dea 

Moines. 
Des Moines, Alice Durham, 3607 Ingersoll Ave. 

Japan. 

Gertrude Willcox Weakley (Mrs. W. R.), Tokuyama, Yamaguchi Ken. 

Kentucky. 

Sara Louise Strauss, 124 Hillcrest Ave., Louisville. 

Maine. 

Eastern, Clarissa Danforth, 98 Cumberland St., Bangor. 

Western, Alice Foster Everett (Mrs. H. J.), 125 Park St., Portland. 



149 
Alumnae Association 



^n^alSL.., Erma Spencer Carter (Mrs. J. O, Weyman Park Apts. 

^^^^^?.XrClara ^F-..-n Piatt (Mrs C E ) f-g,B-» Maiden 
Boston, Ruth F/and^r5 Turner (MIS. r,^^^^ ^^^ pp. Box 267. 
SS S;4\r B^f n " «L. St., B.ad<o.d D.s^.c. 
Lowell, Irene Hogan, 117 ^**^^ ^ji' ^ter Terrace, Swampscott. . 

^«;"«4V, Ruth E. Clark, 12 Gcrmam St. 
'^'"dX;., Carol M. Roehm. Orchard Hill, R.F.D. 3, Pon.iac. 

Minnesota. ^ ,• -it ,^ 491 s Fremont Ave., South. , * - 

f,:"K:'/:'FraS'H..fr«' D^ollJ/Wrs. J. R.), 1857 Laurel Ave. 

Missouri. . Marrell 5900 Overhill Rd. 

frLo^w^^o^gra^&^iirs^^^^ 

"""' O^/ta, Virginia M. Leussler. 1137 South 31st St. 
''^^^e'odosiT G: Sargeant, 64 Arlington St., Manchester. 

New Jersey. .^ r V.), Chairman, 48 North Terrace, 

Helen Stratemeyer Adams (.Mrs. rs^. v./, 
Maplewood. 

^"-""^Srspitz Bigler (Mrs. Earle), Box 125. Artcsia. 

^"■^bITo^o, Ethel Keller 258 Crescent Ave ^^^^ 

£a?^^rn N. 7. Maude Ludington, 90 Chestnut ^.^^^^ ^^^ 

Sr^o^f c4^GLd";s^t/at.i^HurJ^(^ Charles F., Jr.). 417 Rwer- 
Koc^^t^ Ry^er Hemin^^n (M.. T. H.). 309 Canterbury Rd. 
Syracuse, Helen Judson, 133 Wood Ave. 
IJtica, Breta P. Lewis, Vernon, N. Y. 

^^"ife..n. Dorothy, Gou/d ^"foO^ (^aJra^d^St^'^Co^n^^^' Ky.^'" 

Cincinnati, Louise Chase, 500 Garrard ^^..^^2094 Cornell Rd. ^ 

Yotngstown, Angeline Lwrfoni Faran (Mrs. J. J.), 

°'^T^U.nd. Elizabeth i'.ac.cfe Lawrence (Mrs. G. A.), 771 Ever... St. 

^^"/ir<f.a";r«, Mar, Jame», 447 CUj /-^ f cran.on ^^ 

^t^-^ ^f^S^^^. Pres., 3314 North and 
Southeastern, Florence Copeland Yates (.mrs. j 

pr«.?-;;.fXAnnTGiln,ore, 816 Baldwin St. 
^"TJ^tZ'i, Helen SulUv^ Mead (Mrs. George H.). 34 Barnes St. 
^°" Ann°^X(V Brown (Mrs. Rush), 1310 4th Ave. So., Sioox Fall.. 



ISO Alumnae Association 

Tennessee. 

Chattanooga, Hilda Garson Loveman (Mrs. B.), 213 High St. 
Nashville, Edith Tolles Sanborn (Mrs. H. C), Woodmont Blvd. 

Utah. 

Salt Lake City, Edna Jennings, 620 5th Ave. 

Vermont. 

State, Agnes McBride Baldwin (Mrs. Henry), Park Terrace, Essex Jet. 

Virginia. 

State, Helen Coale Worthington (Mrs. Hugh), Sweet Briar. 

Washington. 

Spokane, Mabel McDuffee King (Mrs. John), E. 637 18th Ave. 
Western, Grace Worthington, Quilcene. 

Wisconsin. 

Madison, May Greene Paul (Mrs. B. H.), Forest Products Laboratory. 
Milwaukee, Alice Wieber Fitzgerald (Mrs. Robert), 402 44th St. 



INDEX 



Academic Year 
Administration 
Admission: — 

Advanced Standing . 

Department of Hygiene 
Physical Education 

Department of Music 

Examinations 

Freshman Class . 

Graduate Students 

Methods 

Requirements 

Special Students 
Alumnae Association, Officers 

OF 

American School of Classical 

Studies in Athens 
American School of Classical 

Studies in Rome 
Anglo-Saxon . 
Architecture 
Art . 

Art Collections 
Astronomy 
Bequest, Forms of 

History, Literature, 
Interpretation 
Hall 



page 
5 
. IS 

. 32 

and 

34, 86 

34, 107 

22 

18 

33 

20 

24 

34 



41, 



in Hygiene 
Education . 



and 



Biblical 
and 
Billings 
Board 
Botany 
Calendar 
Certificates 
Physical 
Chemistry 

Christian Association 
College Entrance Examination 

Board .... 
Committees of Trustees . 
Committees of Faculty . 
Correspondence 
Courses of Instruction 
Dante Prize .... 
Degrees: — 

B.A., Requirements for . 

M.A., Requirements for . 
Degrees Conferred in 1924 
Economics .... 
Education .... 
English Composition . 
English Language 
English Literature . 
Examinations: — 

Admission .... 

College 

Expenses .... 

Faculty 

Farnsworth Art Building 

Fees 

Fellows 

Fellowships .... 



148 
129 

129 
68 
42 
41 

136 
43 

140 

45 
136 
124 

47 

5 

144 
52 
17 

22 
7 

16 
2 

41 

94 

35 
39 
141 
54 
58 
66 
68 
61 

22 
123 
123 
9 
136 
125 

14 
127 



page 
Foundation and Purpose . . 17 
Founders Hall .... 135 

French ^'o Ia 

Geography . . . • 72, 74 

Geology 

German 

Gothic 

Government, Instruction in 

82, 83, 
Graduate Instruction 
Greek .... 
Harmony 

Health Provisions 
Hebrew .... 
History .... 
Honors in Subjects , 
Hygiene and Physical Educa 

tion . 
Italian 



108, 



Laboratories 

Latin 

Libraries 

Logic 

Marine Biological Laboratory 

at Woods Hole 
Mathematics 
Meteorology . 
Mineralogy 
Music. .... 

Equipment in 

Instrumental and Vocal 

Theory of . . . 
Music Hall . 
Observatory . 
Pedagogy 
Philosophy . 
Physical Education . 
Physics .... 
Physiology 
Political Science 
Psychology 
Reading and Speaking 
Residence 
Scholarships 

With Stipend: — 
For Graduates 
For Undergraduates 

Without Stipend 
Scientific Collections 
Sociology 

Spanish .... 
Special Students . 
Studio Practice . 
Students' Aid Society 
of Students 
Board of 



Summary 
Trustees, 
Tuition . 
Vacations 
Wellesley 
Zoology . 



Clubs 



46, 



39, 



1 



72 
75 
78 

85 

39 

79 

103 

126 

47 

80 

144 



9, 



108, 



54, 



41, 



86 

94 

136 

96 

135 
108 

129 

99 
114 

11 
102 
136 
107 
103 
136 
136 

58 
111 

86 
113 
121 

84 
109 
116 
126 
127 

127 

130 

145 

136 

56 

117 

34 

42 

134 

147 

6 

123 

5 

148 

119 






Published by the College in January, April, May, November, December 

Entered as second-class matter, December 20, 1911, at the Post Oflfice, 
Boston, Massachusetts, under Act of,Congress of August 24, 1912.